relationships

When Worlds Collide: Dating and Dealing With Parents

You’re facing down a process that, according to a bazillion sitcoms and teen dramas, ought to fill you with dread: introducing the person you're dating to your parents and trying to peacefully navigate their feelings about your budding romance.

Scarleteen Mix #4: Getting Gone and Moving On

You know it's time to go, and you know it's also time to start letting go.  You probably have a whirlwind of different feelings about it. You may be leaving the worst relationshipyou've ever had, you may find yourself having to let go of what felt like the very best one. Maybe it's a friend, maybe it's a love, maybe it's a FWB, your town, your family, or even just a way of thinking or believing. No matter what it was, what you know it's got to be now is over and what you've got to start to get is over it.

Should I compromise on valuing myself?

Anonymous asks:
I've always had high standards. Really high. Some of my friends used to agree with me, but when it came down to it they lowered their standards and went on dates with people they wouldn't have previously considered. I didn't....

Scarleteen Confidential: Helping Youth Handle Rejection

Young people don’t arrive at their conclusions about appropriate romantic behavior in a vacuum; they’re influenced by a myriad of messages, including input from the adults in their lives. Sometimes that input includes ideas that end up exacerbating issues around rejection and dating. One of the ways we can work towards a world in which acts like this no longer happen, a world in which people, and women in particular, aren’t afraid their “no” will make them a target of violence, is to make a concerted effort to help the young people in our lives learn to deal with rejection in healthy ways. With that in mind, we’ve put together recommendations to assist adults in doing exactly that.

No. More.

What should you do when someone says no to or otherwise refuses or declines your romantic or sexual gestures or asks Accept it and stop making those gestures or asks. That's the right answer every single time: just accept someone's no and then back right off.

Asking or otherwise pressing over and over isn't the right answer. "Not giving up" (which often looks a whole lot like harassment) isn't the right answer.  Trying to get them to change their mind isn't the right answer.  Trying to get them to change their mind through their friends or family also isn't the right answer. And while it should be obvious, we so sadly know that it isn't: no kind of violence is ever the right answer.

How do I cope with being a lesbian and single?

Anonymous asks:
I feel like my loneliness is eating me alive. Every time I wake up, I expect someone to be sleeping next to me. However, no one ends up being there and it's rather devastating to me. I am not in the place in my life where I have time for a relationship. Also, I am paranoid that I will never meet anyone and that I will die alone. I'm going off to college in a year, will I meet other people there?...