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treatment

Carnival of Chlamydia Questions

Anonymous asks:

Can you get Chlamydia from giving your boyfriend head then having vaginal sex? I mean I've heard that, but is it true if you use a condom after the oral?

Sex during STI treatment?

yo asks:

So my girlfriend and I have and are three days into the treatment for chlamydia. Is it okay to have sex with a condom, or not?

How can I have Chlamydia when he doesn't?

Ajay asks:

Me and my partner have been together for 5 months now. I have just recently been tested positive for an STI (chlamydia). My partner and I have never used condoms because I am on the pill. My partner went and got himself tested and his results came back negative. How is that possible?

inSPOT

A fantastic online tool to anonymously notify previous and/or current sexual partners if you are diagnosed with an sexually transmitted infection, so they they can get treatment for themselves and notify their partners, too.

She got Chlamydia again after being treated: how?

concerned asks:

My friend got Chlamydia and got treated for it. Then about two months later it came back again. Do you think the medication didn't work or do you think he cheated on his girlfriend?

The why and how-not of yeast infections

Anonymous asks:

What causes a yeast infection and how can I prevent one?

I have HPV, and I don't want him to know.

Gaby asks:

I got HPV from my last sexual partner. I was wondering if I went to donate blood would I still be able to? My new partner doesn't know I have this and I don't want him to find out. By donating blood and getting the results back will they be able to tell I have it?

Is bacterial vaginosis to blame for this excess discharge?

Anonymous asks:

Hi, I was recently treated for some sort of bacterial infection in the vagina with metronidazole pills that I took twice a day for a week. Toward the last couple of days of treatment, my discharge came out in long, oozing strings pretty much every time I sat down to go to the bathroom. It was pretty gross! I figured it had something to do with everything being cleared out, but it still lasted for a day or two after I stopped treatment. Now, I've been off of the antibiotics for nearly a week, and I'm still noticing a little bit more discharge than I would probably want. Is there kind of an adjustment period here? Did the medication not fully treat the problem...or did it cause ANOTHER one?

Can I have sex when I've got a yeast infection?

Emma asks:

I take oral contraception, no biggie there. I was recently put on amoxicillin by my doctor for a sinus infection. I think I developed a yeast infection as a result. I had one before way back when, so I knew what the symptoms were. At any rate, I bought one of those over the counter 3-day cure kits. However, I forgot that the goo was supposed to be inserted at night and I instead put it in during the day (triggered mostly by the fact that I started using the kit as soon as I got it home and repeated the dose at the same time each day). It's three days later and it still itches a bit down there. Did I totally botch the goo? Should I try again?

Additionally, my fiance comes home from six months of overseas military duty on Friday. I'd like to be able to sleep with him then (hence why I'm trying to get this all cleared up), but we use condoms as one method of birth control and I've heard that these over the counter yeast infection cures decrease their effectiveness and cause them to break. What can I do?

Too Young for Sexual Pain?

I Googled the hell out of my problem until I came upon a curious condition called vulvodynia -- or more specifically, vulvar vestibulitis syndrome. Something clicked, the symptoms there... that was me, those stories were me! I brushed it off again as my mind being overactive and diagnosing myself with something that didn't exist – isn't that what hypochondriacs do, cruise the Web looking for obscure problems with big names for every little symptom?

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