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oral

Help! I can only orgasm in the same position.

Jen asks:

Help! I"m 22 and I can only orgasm with my legs completely straight and close together. How can I change this? I've been having manual/oral sex with my boyfriend for 5 months now and still don't have to courage to tell him because I'm embarassed. Am I weird? Can this be fixed? If so, how?

Are condoms really necessary for oral sex?

Heather asks:

You say that condoms/protection needs to be used even during oral sex because of the risk of STDs. Do me and my partner still need to worry about this if neither of us has touched someone else sexually before?

What's wrong with my technique?!?

Honey asks:

I've read that the head of men's penises are very sensitive, or the vein on the underside. But my boyfriend doesn't seem to be affected by it too much. In fact if it wasn't for the fact that he thrusts into my mouth when I go down on him, I would think he was completely unaffected. Could it be my technique or is he just really unresponsive or maybe even a little hardened by sex after indulging (with the same girl) in the past?

Blow jobs, positions, and porn...oh my!

anonymous asks:

Hey. I have a question I want to be answered if you can! Well, I'm most likely going to get my first blow job sometime soon. I wanted to know when I ejaculate, should I tell the girl or should I just do it while she's giving me it, or what should I do? Watching porn doesn't answer my questions. And when having sex, what is the normal position in which most people start, so I don't embarrass myself. Thanks a lot!

The STI Files: Herpes

About one in five people in the United States over age 12 -- approximately 45 million individuals -- are infected with HSV-II, the virus that causes genital herpes. Around 50 - 80% of the adult population has oral herpes, which most people contract through nonsexual contact in childhood.

The STI Files: Chlamydia

Chlamydia is the most common bacterial infection (STI) in the United States, with about 3 million new cases reported annually. Chlamydia ("cla-mid-ee-ah") is so common in young women that, by age 30, 50% of sexually active women have evidence that they have had chlamydia at some time during their lives.

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