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Pill + Condoms = Effective Enough?

Teenie asks:

I'm 18 and i've JUST started having sex. I've done the deed 3 times and I've done all this research about fertility detection, rhythm method, and effectiveness of condoms and the pill. I've been on the pill for 2 years for acne reasons and I've used a condom every session without slippage or breakage. I try to refrain from the days I'm supposed to be most fertile, or having sex the week before ovulation for example. But all information is different. I hear sperm can last from 5 to 7 days but then I hear 2 - 3 days: which is it?!

My mum's a public health nurse and she's always said that condoms don't always work: does that mean if they slip or break? I've been really careful about my pill lately, making sure I take it every day but the times aren't always consistent: it's usually between 8am and 3pm. I also take zoloft for other reasons: does that ruin the effectiveness of the pill?? My significant other and I also use withdrawl every time: but using the condom and pill as well I still worry lol but is there still a chance I could become pregnant. I'm pretty confident for taking all these extra precautions, but I would still like to know if that's ok.

Can pre-ejaculate cause pregnancy?

Jess asks:

Can a woman become pregnant off of pre-cum fluid alone?

Period = no risk of pregnancy?

Anonymous asks:

My girlfriend and I have been having sex for awhile but recently she had her period. And we both couldn't wait so we had sex during it without a condom. Could she still get pregnant even during her period?

EC Questions

Anonymous asks:

I'm a virgin and engaged in foreplay with my boyfriend a few days ago. There was a point during manual sex where some preejaculate may have come in contact with my vulva in spite of the condom. According to the pregnancy assessment, my odds of being pregnant are low depending on various factors such as ovulation, sperm count, etc. But, as I hadn't started my regular birth control regimen yet and it only takes one sperm to fertilize an egg, to be on the safe side, I took Plan B. A few days later I had some spotting (brown discharge) and a little abdominal pain, which lasted about three days.

I have just a few questions about Plan B. As I understand it, Plan B can sometimes cause spotting and bleeding in women and can make a woman's cycle irregular due to the high dose of hormones being ingested. I've researched a couple of sites, but can't seem to find the answers to the following questions:

1.) What exactly causes the spotting and/or bleeding? Is it the shedding of the uterine lining or something else? Could it be considered a mini-period?

2.) Have there been cases of women taking Plan B correctly (i.e. within the time frame, one pill first, then the 2nd 12 hours later) after one act of unprotected sex, had spotting and/or bleeding and then discovered that she was pregnant?

3.) Does the spotting/bleeding for that month mean that the woman won't have her period the next month? If she does, does that mean that more uterine lining has attached itself to her uterus after her spotting/bleeding and she's just expelling the rest of it?

Not 2 Late

A website devoted to giving information about emergecy contraception and where to obtain it in a fast, effective manner. Hosted by Princeton University, there is also news, resources and other links available.

Not a Faceless Disease

I started to grasp that AIDS hit very diverse people from lots of different backgrounds, but AIDS had no face for me. No real face, I mean. Only a face hidden in a shadow, or behind glasses, with a wig or a base cap and a weird, computerized voice, without a name. But it did get a name for me. And a face.

HPV & Herpes: Why Safer Sex Isn't Always Safe Enough

There are instances in which condom use alone - or the use of dental dams and gloves -- cannot offer the level of STI protection they can in other instances, with STIs which are transmitted not via fluid exchange, but by skin-to-skin contact: namely two of the most common STIs, HPV and Herpes.

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.