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morning-after pill

Morning-After Misunderstandings

Labels inside every box of morning-after pills, drugs widely used to prevent pregnancy after sex, say they may work by blocking fertilized eggs from implanting in a woman's uterus. Respected medical authorities, including the National Institutes of Health and the Mayo Clinic, have said the same thing on their websites.

Such descriptions have become kindling in the fiery debate over abortion and contraception. Based on the belief that a fertilized egg is a person, some religious groups and conservative politicians say disrupting a fertilized egg's ability to attach to the uterus is abortion, "the moral equivalent of homicide," as Dr. Donna Harrison, who directs research for the American Association of Pro-life Obstetricians and Gynecologists, put it. Mitt Romney recently called emergency contraceptives "abortive pills." And two former Republican presidential candidates, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum, have made similar statements.

But an examination by The New York Times has found tha

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He was going to pull out...but he didn't, and I feel bad taking Plan B.

Stacey asks:

My boyfriend and I have been together for about 2 months and we just started having sex. He was my first and I am completely in love with him. We've been protected for 4 of the times with a condom, but tonight we didn't use one. He was about to pull out right before, but he came. I'm really scared that I could become pregnant and I know that one of my friends has the "morning after" pill, but I feel bad taking it. I am so worried and confused. HELP ME!

Can I just use EC instead of other birth control?

LizzyUK2002 asks:

I am going to have sex with my boyfriend soon, but I am really scared about getting pregnant. We are going to use a condom but I'm paranoid that I'm going to get pregnant. I could go on the pill but my mum wont let me.. so I'm going to ask my friend's mum, also. If I could get the morning after pill and take it just in case it won't harm me will it?

What's the difference between the pill and the morning-after pill?

freakoutxx asks:

I'm 16 and thinking about having sex with my boyfriend for the first time. If I do choose to have sex with him I want to be as safe as possible. Of course we'll use a condom, but as I said I want to be as safe as possible so I was wondering about birth control pills. I've heard of the "morning after pill" and of "the pill." What's the difference? I found this info. on 'the pill' but I'm not sure it's accurate:

Combination Pill
This pill contains estrogen and progestin. The combination pill works in two important ways. First, it prevents the ovaries from releasing an egg each month. Second, it causes the cervical mucus near the opening of the uterus to thicken, making it close to impossible for sperm to enter.

Progestin Pill
Unlike the Combination pill, the Progestin pill contains no estrogen. This absence of estrogen means that the ovaries will still release an egg each month. But because the progestin causes a thickening of the cervical mucus (liquid near the opening of the uterus), it's close to impossible for sperm to enter and fertilize the egg

Also I was wondering is if I do choose to have sex with my boy friend, I would not be confiding in my parents, so I would need to get birth control pills on my own or with my boy friend. Would a prescription from my doctor be absolutely neccesary?

It's pretty obvious I don't know much about protecting myself when it comes to sex. But from your site I've gotten so many answers it's awesome! I've learned things about my body I never knew were SO important, and the great consequences of unsafe sex. But I haven't found much about these pills, I was hoping I could get some answers from you. I'd really like to learn more about this even if i don't have sex with my boy friend now I know I'll need to know later if I do. Thank you!!

Emergency Contraception

We get a lot of questions from teens who are wondering if they can prevent pregnancy after intercourse, whether the concern is due to a broken condom or from not using any method of contraception in the first place. Regardless of how it happened, there is something that can reduce the risk of pregnancy if used within 120 hours (or with an IUD, eight days) of your risk. That something is Emergency Contraception.

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.