Skip to main content

minor

My boyfriend wants naked pictures of me: should I do it?

MelissaDV asks:

Me and my boyfriend have been together for 9 months. I'm 17 and he's 22. Everything is going great! We never really fight and my family likes him, too, which is rare. Only problem is he travels a lot for work, he will be gone for 2 weeks at at time. I don't mind, but he asked me to help make his trip better...he wanted me to take nude pictures of myself. I said I would but only because I do love and care about him a lot and thought it would be good for the both of us. But I HATE pictures as it is...I tried to take them for him but I HATE every picture I take and it makes me feel even more self-conscious than I do already. I would rather walk around naked for him all day then take pictures of myself. I know it sounds stupid, but it's just really hard for me. I trust him and know he wouldn't do anything with those pictures but it's hard explaining to him why I don't like pictures, he doesn't get it...should I just suck it up and take em?

I'm 17: can I leave school and move in with my boyfriend now?

worried101 asks:

I know this isn't a question about sex, but I don't have anyone else to ask and I cant find the answer anywhere else. My question: I am 17, 67 days away from being 18, and I want to live with my boyfriend instead who is 24. I have a job that I have been at since January, and I have a car that is in my name and my moms name. I am still in high school, but I want to drop out and get my GED. If I get my GED can I leave my mom's house? Is there anything she can legally do to stop me or keep me in her house? Thanks so much for your time.

The morning after the morning after (or, what the FDA decision about Plan B means to you)

The morning after pill is now legal in the U.S. for over-the counter use, without a prescription, for those over 18.

But what does that mean to you?

Following is an in-depth question and answer page about the decision and how it will be applied for all women, about Plan B, and about pharmacist refusals and how to manage them. Please circulate this information and/or link it as widely as possible, (with attribution to the author, please).

The FDA press release from the day of the decision stated:

Read more...

Emergency Contraception Finally OTC in the US.

Well, for women 18 and older.

Minors will still need a prescription to obtain emergency contraception in most states. Despite the restriction, this is a step in the right direction that was a long overdue. For more information about emergency contraception and how it works, check out this article on Scarleteen's main site: Emergency Contraception. To learn more about the accessibility of the morning after pill in your state GO2EC.org is the place to start.

Read more...

Are you quite sure you wanted public opinion?

Dr. Crawford at the FDA said he wanted more public opinion on OTC status for emergency contraception.

Okay. Here's some from a woman, who, according to Dr. Crawford, is barely old enough to comprehend a simple, single sentence which informed her to take one pill now, and another in twelve hours:

Dear Dr. Lester Crawford,

Read more...

Speak Up for Over-the-Counter Emergency Contraception NOW!

The FDA panel overseeing the issue of making EC over the counter has not only once stalled on a ruling because they have requested "public comment" before doing so, they have now stated they need even MORE public comment. Bear in mind that, to my knowledge, NO drug before has EVER been required a "public comment" period, and since it is the FDA's job to only consider medical and health safety issues, public sentiment that is NOT about those issues should have no bearing on their decisions.

Read more...

The FDA thinks you're stupid.

Not only has the FDA yet AGAIN delayed a ruling on over-the-counter access for emergency contraception with a completely bogus excuse, they've made clear that they have NO plans to make it OTC for one of the groups which need it over the counter the most: young adult women.

From National Organization for Women President Kim Gandy:

The National Organization for Women calls on women's health advocates to join in a National Day of Action on Tuesday, August 30, protesting the decision by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding emergency contraception (EC).

Read more...

Want birth control? Even if it means your parents will be notified?

Young women may soon have to wait five days or more before obtaining contraceptives, so that their parents can be notified. On Tuesday, a bill known as the "Parents Right to Know Act" was introduced in both the US Senate and House of Representatives (S 1279, HR 3011). This legislation would require clinics receiving federal funds under Title X to notify the parents of any minors who seek contraception at least five days before writing a prescription. It does not demand parental consent, but allows no exceptions to the notification requirement.

Read more...

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.