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birth control

When can you get pregnant?

Anonymous asks:

If you had sex a week or days after your period can you get pregnant?

He isn't okay with condoms, so I'm starting the patch. Is that safe enough?

Anonymous asks:

I'm planning to start taking birth control, patches to be more specific. My boyfriend and I used to just use just the withdrawal method before we started using condoms and he is still very uncomfortable with condoms. He cannot be as aroused when he has it on. I know sex feels better without a condom but, I would like to know if using a condom is completely necessary when already taking another type of birth control, like the pill or the patch? What do most women regularly do?

Will I get pregnant if I only take my birth control pills after sex?

Anonymous asks:

I often have unprotected sex with my ex-fiance. Stupid I know. But I am supposed to be on birth control pills. In June, after we split I stop taking them. Now in December we have had intercourse multiple time again. I have two questions. If I take a pill every time after our intercourse (which I've been doing), will I get pregnant? And will that mess up my body?

Can you get pregnant the first time you have sex?

Healthgirl02 asks:

I was given an assignment in health class, asking to get this question answered on your website. I know this is a very common question among teens and thought you could help me and my classmates out. I will be bringing your response to this question into class to discuss with other peers. The question is...Can I get pregnant the first time we do it without protection? I hope to hear back from you very soon considering this is an assignment I need to report back to my health class with this information as soon as possible.

How many times can you have sex until you get pregnant?

brittany asks:

How many times can you have sex until you get pregnant?

He says he won't use condoms on our honeymoon, even though I don't want to get pregnant.

Cassandra asks:

My boyfriend and I have been dating well over a year and we have talked about getting married. He said that on the honeymoon he is not going to wear a condom. I, however, want him to because I don't want to get pregnant right away. I know that you won't get pregnant right away every time, but I don't want to take the chance. I have told him this, yet he still insists on not wearing one. Basically I'm asking how can I change his mind or get him to see it from my point of view?

What's the difference between the pill and the morning-after pill?

freakoutxx asks:

I'm 16 and thinking about having sex with my boyfriend for the first time. If I do choose to have sex with him I want to be as safe as possible. Of course we'll use a condom, but as I said I want to be as safe as possible so I was wondering about birth control pills. I've heard of the "morning after pill" and of "the pill." What's the difference? I found this info. on 'the pill' but I'm not sure it's accurate:

Combination Pill
This pill contains estrogen and progestin. The combination pill works in two important ways. First, it prevents the ovaries from releasing an egg each month. Second, it causes the cervical mucus near the opening of the uterus to thicken, making it close to impossible for sperm to enter.

Progestin Pill
Unlike the Combination pill, the Progestin pill contains no estrogen. This absence of estrogen means that the ovaries will still release an egg each month. But because the progestin causes a thickening of the cervical mucus (liquid near the opening of the uterus), it's close to impossible for sperm to enter and fertilize the egg

Also I was wondering is if I do choose to have sex with my boy friend, I would not be confiding in my parents, so I would need to get birth control pills on my own or with my boy friend. Would a prescription from my doctor be absolutely neccesary?

It's pretty obvious I don't know much about protecting myself when it comes to sex. But from your site I've gotten so many answers it's awesome! I've learned things about my body I never knew were SO important, and the great consequences of unsafe sex. But I haven't found much about these pills, I was hoping I could get some answers from you. I'd really like to learn more about this even if i don't have sex with my boy friend now I know I'll need to know later if I do. Thank you!!

Are we using condoms properly?

Anonymous asks:

Alright, so me and my boyfriend had sex for the first time yesterday. It was my first time ever having sex, but I was confident about it. We used a condom and he is very safe about it. As well, during sex he does not have an orgasm and will pull out for my comfort of mind. He makes sure there are no holes in them and uses them how he is told. However, I have a few questions.
1) How protective is a condom?
2) As another precaution, I made sure that he ejaculated BEFORE we engaged in sex at all. This we did in the morning at about 8:00AM and had sex at around 3:30PM. What are the chances of pregnancy using this method as well as a condom and pulling out?
3) I am making sure I start going on the pill or the patch, but do not know much about either. Which is more recommended and why?

I know that I seem paranoid taking so many precautions, but I do not want to continue having sex until I have made sure of as many contraceptive ideas as possible.

What is the safe sex period?

Naina asks:

What is the safe sex period? Is it is necessary to use precautions every time while having sex? As I am getting married soon and sometimes I don't want to use any precaution and same time I don't want to get pregnant? Please guide me.

Low-Income Access to Contraception... Orr Not?

U.S. President Bush has just appointed a visible critic and opponent of contraception to head Title X, our family planning program whose purpose is to provide access to contraception and other family planning services.

In a 2000 Weekly Standard article, Orr railed against requiring health insurance plans to cover contraceptives. “It’s not about choice,” said Orr. “It’s not about health care. It’s about making everyone collaborators with the culture of death.”

Read more...

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