Donate Now
We've Moved! Check out our new boards.
  New Poll  
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sexual Ethics and Politics » Sex Ed. beyond Scarleteen

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Sex Ed. beyond Scarleteen
goodmagpie
Neophyte
Member # 42795

Icon 1 posted      Profile for goodmagpie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Heya,

I'm not sure if this is the place to post this, but I couldn't think of anywhere better, so here we go [Smile] .

I'm currently looking into University choices and courses, and I was wondering what the best qualifications are to go for if you want to work in Sex Education. There's no way I'd be able to be a nurse and find a career like that, due to my current qualifications (and the fact taking a medical science at degree level would KILL me), and I kind of want to do youth work regarding sexuality (in all that term means, not just orientation) rather than the biological stuff. I know that I've just pretty much outlined a fictional job, but I figured if I did that, then anything that relates to that could be flagged up for me.

Also, if anyone knows any UK based or international organisations that offer accreditation for peer to peer sex ed. then letting me know them'd be great too, 'cos I can't find any (I've already had training but I'm only qualified by them to work within that organisation, if that makes sense).

Thanks; my University support worker in my college isn't too savvy on this field, for fairly understandable reasons [Razz] ! x

Posts: 23 | From: UK | Registered: May 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
There's truly no one set of qualifications to be a sexuality educator: most of us have come in through a variety of different tracks and educational avenues. For instance, I came in via an educational and work background in education as well as writing/literature and sociology.

There are a couple specific educational programs to study sexuality as a major or for graduate degrees, but they're few and far between, and haven't been around for very long, so most of the people working in sexuality or sex ed don't have those degrees.

My colleagues Dorian and Mitchell wrote a piece on this I think is really great and informative, so why don't you check that out: http://www.sexualityeducation.com/sexeducator.php

Just FYI? At this point still being a sex educator OFTEN means designing and creating that job oneself, so you feeling like you just made up a fictional job? That's okay: that's kind of what a lot of us have done. For instance, I designed and started Scarleteen: neither it nor anything like it existed when I did. You get to design your job -- in sex ed or otherwise -- if you want to.

Just also know that a lot of the time, the paycheck from sex ed is fictional, too: in other words, this is a very hard job to make a good living at, and most sex educators either live pretty lean, or do this gig in addition to something else with better and more stable pay.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
goodmagpie
Neophyte
Member # 42795

Icon 1 posted      Profile for goodmagpie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thanks for the link - it's really helpful. I had a feeling that sex education as a field very much involves creating your own career, but I thought I'd best check, just in case there was a helpful short-cut or a really good course or something.

And money is not really what I'm looking for out of a career; my other options are equally as financially viable (or not, as the case may be...). Some sort of back up plan is definately going to be in place, regardless, but thanks for the warning. I guess I'd best start organisation-hunting [Smile] ...

Posts: 23 | From: UK | Registered: May 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I don't mean to harp on the money, it's just something I always want to be transparent about. being 40 and still having to work more than one job most of the time, and still not having my basic needs met most of the time (I don't have any kind of insurance, never have, don't have a house, a car, etc.) can be really rough, especially since I don't have the level of energy I had at 20, something I didn't envision then.

So, I'd suggest either a backup, or thinking creatively about a way you can BOTH do what you want to do and have some kind of stable income. For instance, I work part-time providing education through a couple clinics. If I wasn't doing Scarleteen, I could likely work at a clinic full-time, do that AND other duties there, all while having benefits and a paycheck I could count on. OR, I could have stayed teaching in school systems and likely taught other things while also teaching full-time. There are ways to do this where you aren't living so lean, but it does take some creative thinking and planning (she says, in hindsight). [Smile]

I don't think there are shortcuts with this, not if you want to do it right, anyway. It's a very complex and challenging subject. But per orgs in the UK, one place you might want to start is by checking in with Marie Stopes or Brook. I don't know if they do any peer-ed training, but they might, and even if they don't, they'd certainly be likely to be able to point you in the right direction to get started.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CJT
Assistant Director
Member # 40442

Icon 1 posted      Profile for CJT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I can share some about my own path. I got a master's degree in human sexuality education and I'm finishing my doctorate of education (also in human sexuality). I'd definitely echo what Heather said about often needing to carve out your own path or find ways to be creative in your work. I have a full time job that's in human services but not specifically sexuality. But I also work here at Scarleteen, do consulting work and trainings in human sexuality, and lecture at colleges and universities.

I think even more than my formal schooling or training, it's been super helpful to get Real Life Experience. That means that I've put in lots of time volunteering and offering up my time and talent for organizations and people I know are doing good work. Networking is hugely important. Most of what I've been able to do in sex ed has come through knowing people, or people who know folks doing stuff similar to what I like. If you've done some work with organizations or agencies already, you could talk to people there to see if they know anywhere/anyone else you might be able to work with (shadowing, assisting, volunteering, etc.)

Posts: 384 | From: Philadelphia, PA | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

  New Poll   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3