Donate Now
We've Moved! Check out our new boards.
  New Poll  
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sexual Ethics and Politics » Men Can Stop Rape

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Men Can Stop Rape
Gumdrop Girl
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 568

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Gumdrop Girl     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I heard about this group in my employee newsletter. They're called Men Can Stop Rape, and they're a youth outreach program that teaches young men about preventing sexual violence and promoting respectful relationships. They've got programs around the US; they just started a chapter in Riverside County, about an hour east of LA.

I think it's high time a program targeted young men, especially young men of color (but all races encouraged ot aprticipate). A lot of focus has been on women and steering them away from dangerous relationships, but not enough resources were pointed at teaching men to treat women with repsect. I'm stoked that MCSR is expanding. Around here, they're under a grant provided by the state of CA.

After reading their evaluation stuff, the only flaw I see in their education method is that participation is voluntary. So you get guys who are already somewhat aware of the problem of rape (like guys who are in tough home situations, or guys whose sisters have been assaulted) who are already leaning away from that sort of behavior.

If you can bring it to all guys in 8th and 9th grade, maybe even 7th, you could catch them while they're young enough, before they adopt too many "macho" misogynistic behaviors. I'd also like to see programs like this brought to juvie facilities.

anyway, i think it's cool. what do you think? do you have a chapter at your school? are you a member of Men of Strength or know someone who is?

check out their site: http://www.mencanstoprape.org

------------------
LA County STD Hotline 1.800.758.0880
Toll free STD and clinic information, and condoms sent to your door for Los Angeles County residents.
1 in 3 sexually active people will be exposed to a STD by the time they turn 24.


Posts: 12677 | From: Los Angeles, CA ... somewhere off the 10 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
PERVasive
Activist
Member # 25065

Icon 1 posted      Profile for PERVasive     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I think it's great that this organization is taking a stand against rape while emphasizing the masculinity of its members! When that kind of message comes from a women's group, I think a lot of guys have trouble hearing it. Many guys, especially the more "macho" ones IMO, are insecure about their own masculinity, and want nothing more than to feel confident in their manhood. Since in our society it is very difficult to feel independent, especially as a teenager, the only outlet many guys see for their insecurity may be to establish abusive dominance over a woman. This program provides an alternative.

We don't have this organization at my school, so I don't know what is actually included in their programs, but just based on their website I think they emphasize the actual act of rape a bit too much. I think very few guys would disagree with the statement that rape is wrong, and beating them over the head with it isn't going to help. Based on what I hear kids saying at school, though, I think what is needed is some more education about general issues of respect for women.

When I'm hanging out with my guy friends we often discuss girls who we think are hot or otherwise attractive. In general the tone is, at least in my opinion, respectful, and the conversation stays within the realm of admiration of the female figure (i.e. It's fine to say someone's hot: I don't think many people would object to being described as physically attractive. However, it's not really okay to talk about them as merely a sex object). However, one of my friends frequently makes comments about girls that I find offensive and misogynist; in a typical exchange I might say something like "In my Latin class there's this chick who sits in front of me; she's so friggin' hot!" upon which he will respond "Would you **** her?" I have asked him to refrain from making objectifying comments about women when he's around me, but he hasn't stopped. I think the reason is because he doesn't understand what is wrong with his attitude. He may not even understand what I mean by objectifying! I know for a fact that he would never endorse rape or abuse, but at the same time I worry that he may do such actions himself at some point, just because his attitude is so off.

For this reason, I would like to see an effort made to teach guys respect for women in general. I agree completely with Gumdrop Girl that this type of program would have to be introduced early before stereotypes are so ingrained. I doubt a mere change in classroom curriculum could bring these sorts of changes about though: the problem is far too ingrained in our culture. Guys need healthy outlets for their masculinity, and the current paradigm of high school existing for the sole purpose of preparing students for college does not provide that. High schools need to provide more opportunities for students to take on some adult roles in the community, as a subsitute for some of the huge academic workload. Only someone who feels empowered can show respect for others confidently.

(Such programs would be for all students, of course, and both sexes seem to be feeling the same lack of purpose as far as I can see. I'm just emphasizing the male student population because the topic at hand is male mistreatment of women)

------------------
- PERVasive

"Don't let your schooling get in the way of your education." - Mark Twain


Posts: 64 | From: Boston, MA | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BetterSitUp
Neophyte
Member # 20367

Icon 1 posted      Profile for BetterSitUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I agree, i believe that this program has great potential. As PERVasive stated, it would be great if they could teach about respect for women, as well as about the prevention of rape, etc.

I do however wonder why in your post Gumdrop Girl you stated:
"I think it's high time a program targeted young men, especially young men of color (but all races encouraged ot aprticipate)."

Isn't it true that most rapes commited in this country are done by white men? Perhaps I am wrong, but that is the information I have always been given. However, putting that fact aside I don't believe that a program such as this should single out "men of color". Shouldn't all men have the ability to learn about this sensitive subject?

Sorry if I misunderstood your meaning, it just seems a bit as if you are perpetuating a stereotype.


Posts: 19 | From: USA | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Gumdrop Girl
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 568

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Gumdrop Girl     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The programs currently in place to discourage sexual assault are found in places like colleges. Say what you will about affirmative action, but the overlap between poverty and race has lent itself to a lot of people of color not going to college. a lot of them essages are being missed. The thing about public health interventions is that you do have to target for specific races and orientation.

So in your perfect little world, the collegiate Take Back the Night program would reach everybody and everybody would benefit, but it just doesn't happen that way. Poverty and race figure strongly in issues of rape and domestic violence. Class and culture have a LOT to do with these. But if this program can reach people in juvie, HS and middle school, then it'll have a better chance of reaching communities of color.

------------------
LA County STD Hotline 1.800.758.0880
Toll free STD and clinic information, and condoms sent to your door for Los Angeles County residents.
1 in 3 sexually active people will be exposed to a STD by the time they turn 24.


Posts: 12677 | From: Los Angeles, CA ... somewhere off the 10 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
(I'm fairly certain Beppie isn't living in a "perfect little world," Gummy. Not sure what that was about.)

Bep: per everything I've read over the years, rape in general tends to be multi-racial, and per class, it also runs the gamut. Mind you, some of those statistics may not be entirely accurate, given two big biases:

- for statistics based on which rapists were charged and imprisoned, the stats are always going to be very skewed as primarily low-income black men are imprisoned (in the U.S.). There is also a reporting issue in that often rapes involving very affluent white men are underreported, for likely obvious reasons.

- same goes for reporting with affluent white women, whose rapists are often of their same race and class: they report less often.

Serial rapists, on the other hand, do tend to be white and more often middle-class. Same goes for date/acquaintance rapists.

------------------
Heather Corinna
Editor & Founder, Scarleteen
ST blog about Heather & Scarleteen
"You have to love women who are brave enough to do things so big in a world where women are supposed to be so small." - Andrea Dworkin


Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Per these programs, I say big yay.

However, much as I wish it weren't so, nearly all of the data I've seen on things like this show that these programs work okay as preventatives, but not at all well as corrective measures once any of this behaviour in place. (And given the culture we live in, that may make who it can work with as a preventative a woefully small group.)

Rather, study on this stuff usually shows that per both rapists and domestic abusers, imprisonment and then the resulting fear of imprisonment is about the only thing that's at all effective.


Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Beppie
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 94

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Beppie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Er... I haven't contriubted to this discussion yet-- I think you were referring to BetterSitUp.
Posts: 2710 | From: Australia | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

  New Poll   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3