Donate Now
We've Moved! Check out our new boards.
  New Poll  
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sexual Ethics and Politics » Sex ed in high school

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Sex ed in high school
icygirl88
Activist
Member # 23887

Icon 1 posted      Profile for icygirl88     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Personally, at my school, sex ed is really pointless. We only have "issues for youth" freshman and sophomore year, and only for half a year, probably once or twice a week. And only a small part of the class is actually about sex ed.

Most of it involves learning how sex is BAD, encouraging abstinance, learning about STD's and pregnancy to deter us from sex, and then a VERY brief discussion of condom use... and that's it.

So I want to know, what is sex ed like in other high schools? The same, different, better, worse?
And what do you think that sex ed in school SHOULD be like? What should they discuss? (The current goal of sex ed, the way I see it, is to encourage abstinence.. is that appropriate?)


Posts: 72 | From: massachusetts | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bobbyflay
Activist
Member # 19955

Icon 1 posted      Profile for bobbyflay     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
When i was in high school, it was about the same as how yours is. I personally think that, sure staying away from sex will prevent all of these so called problem etc etc. but that's not going to happen at all, so teaching kids the proper way to use contraceptives is the right way to go. I think they alot of people think that just having intercourse and ejaculating inside the woman is the only way you can get pregnant, which of course is not true. that's why you see so many people on these forums worried that they touch their partners penis or there was some clear stuff coming out? can i get pregnant from that. I see red spots or bumps on my genitails what can it be? etc etc. You see many of these over used questions here. That's why i think they should teach more in schools and more on what can get you pregnant and how you can get sti's etc. I didn't know what i was doing when i first enganged in sex with my girlfriend, I thought she was pregnant at some points in our relationship because of "stuff" we did and didn't know the effects of what we did. Sites like these taught me well and now i think i'm pretty confident on the whole sex issue.
Posts: 67 | From: Raleigh,NC | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CEC523
Activist
Member # 23120

Icon 1 posted      Profile for CEC523     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Sex ed is government regulated, which is one reason why I think that it's so pointless. And pointless it is. Our health book talks a lot about STDs/STIs and talks heavily about abstinence. In my class, we do our book work and take the tests that go with the book, but we also have extensive side conversations about condom use and birth control in general.

Did anyone catch that episode of either 20/20 or 60 Minutes a few weeks ago? It was about how sex ed as abstinence education is not working as it should. They have kids sign the pledge to say abstinent until married and while it does influence the kids' decision to wait, it does not make them wait until marriage. Generally. On average the kids would wait a year and a half longer than they would had they not signed the pledge.

What it comes down to is funding. The schools won't get funding unless they teach abstinence and agree to mention nothing about birth control.

A girl I know went to Catholic school all her life. She's very sexually active. A group of us were talking about AIDS and we were surprised that she knew so much about it - she's not exactly the sharpest tac in the bunch, but she's a nice girl. Then we started talking about how HIV can be spread through sexual contact and the girl looked confused. We were like, "What, Karen?" And Karen said, "You can spread HIV through sex? I thought you only got it through sharing needles."

Scary.

------------------
"Talking about music is like talking about sex. Can you describe it?"
-Bruce Springsteen


Posts: 124 | From: New York, NY | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Why me?
Neophyte
Member # 21674

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Why me?     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I most say sex Ed is pretty much teh same, they teach you about STD, about violence in relation, etc. I just can't seen why they made me wach those old videos. (They should actuallyce to the new times) They teach the class saying sex is bad, But sex is not bad. I think the way the schools try to educate about sex is wrong. They should teach about std, and all that stuff, but they should also teach about sex itself. answer questions like:
Can a woman get pregnat if she has sex exactly after her period?
Do you have to use a condon if you are getting oral sex?

This is somethin sexual Ed should also answer.


Posts: 19 | From: San Antonio, Miranda, Venezuela | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
~jess~
Activist
Member # 6304

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ~jess~     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
we read about periods and stuff in 5th grade. the teacher didnt even cover it, he made us read it in our health books. I think thats one of the main reasons I thought periods were icky and something to be a shame of for so many years. it was weird bc the night before I was watching a show on TV and one of the girls started their period. My mom just told me to come to her if anything happened. never explained what a period was or anything.

in 7th grade we had our first "sex ed" class. the first day they did the girls/boys thing. (I feel bad for the boys, they had our principle). we learned about STDs and the human body. same in 9th grade health. we had one hand out on birth control. nothing too special but it was 3 weeks long. plus we had STD Mondays were every monday we would learn about a STD.

this year we had family health. we covered birth control, pregnancy, birth. we actually watched a movie of a couple having sex from the inside of the vagina. then we watched the birth.

------------------
my bucket of tears


Posts: 278 | From: Oregon | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lizenny
Activist
Member # 22661

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lizenny     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I went to a Catholic school for a few years and we had something like sex-ed but instead we called it "Religion class". Between my freshman and junior years we may have mentioned Jesus once or twice and it was majorly on sex and contraceptives. How confusing is that?

It was an annoyingly repetitive class. Year after year it was the same thing in the same order: sex, the menstrual cycle, STDs, homosexuality, pornography, and limited and pretty biased info on birth control. They taught the flaws of each artificial contraceptive method with no mention of failure rate and emphasized the good points of natural methods but discouraged those too. We learned pretty quickly that to get a good grade you pretty much had to write any papers or tests from a totally erotophobic perspective thereby guaranteeing an A+. The basic message was that sex is a beautiful thing except for the fact that it can infect you, get you pregnant, humiliate you, kill you or otherwise ruin your life so don't bother.

We were also taught about "relationships" but that was mostly about how to turn down the advances of hormonally insane teenage male monsters. The overall tone of the lessons would make you want to either ignore them and look for info elsewhere or krazy glue your pants on and weld the zipper shut.

------------------
You catch more flies with manure than you do with honey.


[This message has been edited by lizenny (edited 06-17-2005).]


Posts: 110 | From: Worcester MA | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
windycityskacore
Activist
Member # 19031

Icon 1 posted      Profile for windycityskacore     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Now that I think about it, my sex ed was similar to all of these posts...I don't want to be repititious but I'll breifly describe mine...

5th Grade: The male half of class met after school for a seminar/film...I believe I just learned about menstration...I left wondering still what the heck sex was.

High School: Learned about STDs, teen pregnancy, some birth control methods (not in a very detailed manner, as in we didn't learn how to use them, and I remember being scared and thinking, as I left the room, if I have sex, even if I use protection, I'll get a girl pregnant) but most of all, the value of abstainance. I don't think that these topics were as skewed as in some of the other posts, but I don't remember really learning the "nuts and bolts" of sex...we sorta danced around the topic...

...but I have a concern...I'm an education major and I am learning a lot about school funding. In a previous post, Cec523 said...

"What it comes down to is funding. The schools won't get funding unless they teach abstinence and agree to mention nothing about birth control."

I'm wondering if someone can back that statement up, NOT because I don't believe it's true but because I'm interested in the issue; is this true? I assume some laws deal with what can and cannot be taught in public schools regarding sex ed, but will a school lose state funding because of how they teach this topic? Will it lose some sort of funding from other organizations, perhaps ones that are pro-abstinance?

Really, I'm just curious. I think it'd be a shame if the state government or some other orgainzation with money has financial control over our youth's sexual perception...

------------------
...or is that just me being naive
again?


Posts: 49 | From: Chillinois, USA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
psycho1187
Neophyte
Member # 24002

Icon 1 posted      Profile for psycho1187     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I didn't have any high school sex ed class. None.

We had a Health class in 9th grade that was about STDs, drugs, and the like, but that was very textbook. Nothing actually about SEX, just about very clinical things that could result from it.

We never learned about condoms in high school. Ever.

When I had sex this year, I really had no idea that it was pertinent for me to be using one of those bad boys. I just thought pregnancy was what happened to BAD GIRLS, that it wasn't very common, and that most people were too bothered to use condoms anyway.

This is probably because I went to a Catholic high school. Looking back, that is absolutely ridiculous. Something needs to be changed about that, even though I am aware that private schools can do what they like. It's still so, so unfortunate that many other girls have to end up with the same situation I was in: an abortion.


Posts: 15 | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CEC523
Activist
Member # 23120

Icon 1 posted      Profile for CEC523     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
windycityskacore, here is an article for you on sex education.
http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=864442&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312

From page two, I quote:
"This year, President Bush has earmarked $167 million for abstinence-only education, and his proposed 2006 budget will see an increase of $206 million for such programs.

Meanwhile, schools opting for comprehensive sex education have to pay for those programs from their general budget, provided by local and state governments."

Hope this helps.

------------------
"Talking about music is like talking about sex. Can you describe it?"
-Bruce Springsteen


Posts: 124 | From: New York, NY | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
DJ Retro Maxx
Neophyte
Member # 12418

Icon 1 posted      Profile for DJ Retro Maxx     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I go to public school in Vancouver, Canada, and I think the sex ed is very good. We mostly learned about it in grade 6, 7, 8, and 9. I was never taught that sex is "bad". We learned about condoms, the pill, even discharge. Yet, the teacher can't answer everything, kids still end up with lots of unsanswered questions and end up making bad choices. I definitely think comprehensive sex ed is very good and helps a lot, though.
Posts: 12 | From: Vancouver, Canada | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
hot4nerds
Neophyte
Member # 19419

Icon 1 posted      Profile for hot4nerds     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
There was "Health" in 7th grade, which was about puberty and STD's.

In sophomore year we had the option to take "Health" which was STD's, contraceptives, sex (mostly abstainence) male and female parts and how they work, CPR and that sort of thing was the most we learned about.

We had mandatory "Parenting" class to teach us mroe about sex, birth control, abortion (which it was pro-life) and they had booklets saying 200 ways to be intimate without sex. The books we used were outdated being printed in the 80's. And those were homophobic (I think they called it a disease) and they talked of how STD's are prominant with the gay community. They said women should take care of thier husbands and stay at home. More things about how abortion is wrong etc. And they tried to scare us kids out of having sex to prevent teen pregnancy.

The classes weren't very helpful at all in informing us effectively.


Posts: 38 | From: Albany, Ny | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dailicious
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 22471

Icon 1 posted      Profile for dailicious     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
We had a Health class in middle school that spoke about a lot of horror stories with STDs and HIV and how hard it is to be a teen parent, but nothing really substantial about the importance of safer sex and building good relationships, etc. I skipped the school given health class in High School, though I know from overhearing a couple lectures and from feedback from people I had talked to, at least one of the teachers did cover a number of facts actually presented by Scarleteen things like condom effectiveness being really high when used properly...

Being an avid reader and web hunter and being interested enough in sexuality and safer-sex and that I was already looking into it for myself by that time anyway and knew everything the class presented and didn't want to sit for a semester when most of it was actually about a bunch of other stuff I didn't want to read out of a text book.

I took the BYU correspondance health course and finished my health requirement in a week.

It's not suprising, considering BYU is a very strict Mormon university, but the health course was a huge joke as far as sex and relationships are concerned.

It mentioned STDs briefly in a small paragraph, it spoke of sexual organs in very straight, "sterile" terms (I actually started cracking up during one of the section assignments "The vagina is a recepticle for the erect male penis." A recepticle?? It explained breasts as milk producing structures seperate from the genital reproductive area, and this is the best part:

"Question: What causes the male penis to become errect?"

One of the possible answers? "Willpower." I almost died laughing.

Really, though, all the course said about sex was that if you engaged in it before you were married you would only cause your relationships to break down and you'd lose all your friends and you'd lose all your respectability and you'd be ashamed and lonely. While I can't bash all they said about dating and "male/female" relationships, to insist that having a boyfriend before you finished high school and started college, at least, would cause you to completely ignore your friends and family and focus only on something that at that age you have no maturity or potential for is a bit rude and presumptious.

I had never seen a completely abstinence-only health course before then and it really shocked me at how blindsighted and narrow and completely pointless it seemed; they mentioned nothing that would ever help anyone when they were married and ready to have a sexual relationship even for the sake of bearing children. Completely ridiculous.


Posts: 3382 | From: Denver, Colorado | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
~jess~
Activist
Member # 6304

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ~jess~     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
i have a question, if you taght sex ed and didnt have any laws, what would you cover? How would you change sex ed? what would make it better?
Posts: 278 | From: Oregon | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
(Just a niggle)

You know, letters to school/college boards, teachers, parent-teacher organizations and individual state governments from YOU all -- the youth directly effected by inaccurate, sexist, incomplete, biased and/or substandard sex education can have a LOT of power.

More, actually, than a letter to the from someone like me, or even a parent.

So, when you're steaming about this stuff -- and you should be! Imagine if say, geometry was taught with the same biases and misinformation -- write it out as well as some of you have here and send it off!

------------------
Heather Corinna
Editor & Founder
ST homepageST blogabout Heather & Scarleteen


Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
~jess~
Activist
Member # 6304

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ~jess~     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
trust me, our sex education is the least of our school's problems (sadly). Im not saying its not important but having teachers to teach sex education is. and having money to pay those teachers, and having money to run the school so we have a place to teach sex education would help out a lot.
Posts: 278 | From: Oregon | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CEC523
Activist
Member # 23120

Icon 1 posted      Profile for CEC523     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The yearly budget for health supplies at my school is sixty eight dollars. There are two teachers who teach all of the freshmen, the sophomores who fail freshmen health, all of the juniors, and all of the seniors. Granted, we can't pass a budget in my town so we don't have a lot of money to go around as it is, but it just goes to show you that health is not appreciated as it should be.

------------------
"Talking about music is like talking about sex. Can you describe it?"
-Bruce Springsteen


Posts: 124 | From: New York, NY | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
slegnaevoba
Neophyte
Member # 24235

Icon 1 posted      Profile for slegnaevoba     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
We don't have sex ed. So, its good to see otheres do.
Posts: 8 | From: Aiken | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
honeyblue
Neophyte
Member # 24547

Icon 1 posted      Profile for honeyblue     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 

Given the fact that most schools have poor sex ed programs, it's even more important for young people to have access to accurate information about sexual health. Scarleteen does that online, and the Media Project is a non profit organization that supports the rights of networks to address sexual health issues on television.

The Media Project’s Take PART (Positive Action for Responsible Television)initiative provides an alternative voice to conservative watchdog groups that are waging campaigns advocating that the FCC censor sexual health content on television, threatening shows’ right to free speech. Take PART provides parents and youth alike the opportunity to send an e-mail of support to the FCC and the networks in recognition of shows that take on difficult issues related to sexuality and do so in a responsible manner. In just a short time, Take PART has provided viewers the chance to voice support for shows such as ER, Law and Order: SVU, The Bernie Mac Show, 8 Simple Rules, Judging Amy, and One Tree Hill.

Emails have been sent to networks as well as the FCC, to show that there are many who support the rights of the creative community to accurately depict a variety of topics ranging from safer sex, emergency contraception, to rights of the GLBTQ community.

You're never too young to get involved. Check it out at http://www.themediaproject.com/takepart/index.htm.


Posts: 1 | From: Los Angeles, CA, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dream_blammerator
Neophyte
Member # 23624

Icon 1 posted      Profile for dream_blammerator     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
When I hear of friends from other schools, or even reading a post such as this one, I'm like...they actually have sex ed?

Not even joking. Freshman year you are required to take a health class for 9 weeks for about and hour and a half a day. One day of the whole class we wrote down the definitions of some STD's. Another day we watched the movie Philidelphia. And that was it. The general idea was don't have sex you'll get one or more STD's and/or die.

The general figure of how many freshman this past school year were pregnant is somewhere around 30. That is crazy. I think Sex Ed would do a lot of good in my school.


Posts: 27 | From: Ohio | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
feefiefofemme
Activist
Member # 23917

Icon 1 posted      Profile for feefiefofemme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Our school's sex ed class wasn't actually all that bad, but it certianly could have been a lot better. They taught us about the scientific names for the different sexual organs and about how the baby develops in the womb. Then we watched a video of a woman giving birth. After that they talked to us about STDs and pushed us to abstain until we're out of school. They touched briefly on the importance of using a condom, but never mentioned any other forms of protection. They talked a bit about STDs transmitted through sex between two men, but never once mentioned lesbian sex. Pretty much the only thing the unit did was instill in me a strong desire to teach sex ed classes myself when I get older to make sure kids get the information they need.
Posts: 406 | From: California | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
OMega
Neophyte
Member # 24833

Icon 1 posted      Profile for OMega     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Well, my sex-ed classes were just like most of the others on here.

In grades 4, 5 and 6, all the boys and girls went into different classrooms for an hour and learned about periods, wet dreams, and the like. Then in 7th grade, we were all in the same class and we learned more about periods, and the reproductive system, and STDs, and how you should date when you're a teen, but you shouldn't kiss or touch or anything beyond looking at each other (while fully clothed, of course). Then in 8th grade, we learned the same things we had learned all the previous years. And then the only other sex-ed class is for 10th graders, and it covers the same stuff. But honestly, they didn't go in-depth enough. I didn't know that HIV could be transmitted through breastmilk, and the way we learn about STDs is hard to keep them straight. And they're not allowed to talk about homosexuality, or abortion.


Posts: 12 | From: Omaha, Nebraska, USA | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
OMega
Neophyte
Member # 24833

Icon 1 posted      Profile for OMega     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Well, my sex-ed classes were just like most of the others on here.

In grades 4, 5 and 6, all the boys and girls went into different classrooms for an hour and learned about periods, wet dreams, and the like. Then in 7th grade, we were all in the same class and we learned more about periods, and the reproductive system, and STDs, and how you should date when you're a teen, but you shouldn't kiss or touch or anything beyond looking at each other (while fully clothed, of course). Then in 8th grade, we learned the same things we had learned all the previous years. And then the only other sex-ed class is for 10th graders, and it covers the same stuff. But honestly, they didn't go in-depth enough. I didn't know that HIV could be transmitted through breastmilk, and the way we learn about STDs is hard to keep them straight. And they're not allowed to talk about homosexuality, or abortion.


Posts: 12 | From: Omaha, Nebraska, USA | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kyrie
Neophyte
Member # 24872

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Kyrie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
In the first high school I went to (I switch to a different one my sophmore year) half the year was phys ed, the other half was health class. There was no sex ed. In health class we learned about diseases from sex, drugs that could manipulate you into preforming unwanted sexual acts, such as club drugs like "roofies". Mostly they wanted us to refrain from sexual acts, and we didn't even have a talk about any form of birth controls or how to use them, just to use them. The funny thing was, this school, you think would have a better focus on sex ed rather than health due to the dramatic number of pregnant women in the school.

------------------
"We stand now where two roads diverge. But unlike the roads in Robert Frost's familiar poem, they are not equally fair. The road we have long been traveling is deceptively easy, a smooth superhighway on which we progress with great speed, but at its end lies disaster. The other fork of the road—the one "less traveled by"—offers our last, our only chance to reach a destination that assures the preservation of the earth."
— Rachel Carson


Posts: 5 | From: Massachusetts//U.S.A | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
elliebean
Neophyte
Member # 24791

Icon 1 posted      Profile for elliebean     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
i guess i'm one of the few who had good sex ed. i only have two complaints: it's too late (12th grade,though we did get basic contraception lessons in 9th) and spermicide was stressed as good and important for protection. other than that, we got a full tutorial in contraception, lessons on all the STDs and transmission, we talked about other kinds of sexual activity (oral etc.) as sex rather than something less weighty, and generally learned most of everything we needed to know. guess i was lucky.

oh yeah, i went to public school in NJ. i suppose we don't get any funding from the White House...oy


Posts: 17 | From: USA | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
watermongoose15
Activist
Member # 23441

Icon 1 posted      Profile for watermongoose15     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Originally posted by DJ Retro Maxx:
I go to public school in Vancouver, Canada, and I think the sex ed is very good. We mostly learned about it in grade 6, 7, 8, and 9. I was never taught that sex is "bad". We learned about condoms, the pill, even discharge. Yet, the teacher can't answer everything, kids still end up with lots of unsanswered questions and end up making bad choices. I definitely think comprehensive sex ed is very good and helps a lot, though.

------------------
Give Peace A Chance
-John Lennon
War is Over if you want it
-John Lennon
Make Love not War
-John Lennon


Posts: 60 | From: Bonita, California, United States | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
watermongoose15
Activist
Member # 23441

Icon 1 posted      Profile for watermongoose15     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Originally posted by DJ Retro Maxx:
I go to public school in Vancouver, Canada, and I think the sex ed is very good. We mostly learned about it in grade 6, 7, 8, and 9. I was never taught that sex is "bad". We learned about condoms, the pill, even discharge. Yet, the teacher can't answer everything, kids still end up with lots of unsanswered questions and end up making bad choices. I definitely think comprehensive sex ed is very good and helps a lot, though.

The same goes for me i thought the sex ed class well actually the health class about drugs, sex, 1st aid and cpr was rather informative. Our teacher was rather open about the fact that she said sex felt good but she said that it was something that was shared between two people that loved each other is what she thought it should be and she spoke to us not that it was bad just that we should use protection. she spoke to us about the increase in oral sex in teenagers. The only thing that she slightly shunned upon was anal sex which like we all know carries its risks of bleeding, ripping infection many things

------------------
Give Peace A Chance
-John Lennon
War is Over if you want it
-John Lennon
Make Love not War
-John Lennon


Posts: 60 | From: Bonita, California, United States | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
creater3b
Neophyte
Member # 25391

Icon 1 posted      Profile for creater3b     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If you ask me there is no point in telling a teen he/she cant/shoudnt have sex because they arent going to listen. IF a teen wants to have sex they are going to have sex. SO we need to start educating peeps on how to properly protect themselves. The fact is not all teens will go on the internet to find out about protection they will just go ahead and have unprotected sex.
Posts: 3 | From: east amherst, ny, 14051 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
JamsessionVT
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 17924

Icon 1 posted      Profile for JamsessionVT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Not necessarily. The whole point in sex ed. is to give teens options to prevent accidents if they do in fact have sex, as well as possibly changing a few minds. But many (and I know from experience) after hearing what the consequences are besides pregnancy, decide to postpone their first sexual experiences until they feel they are ready or are with the right person.

So, thank you for sharing your opinion, but lets not generalize here about what teenagers will and won't do, eh?


Posts: 3987 | From: Greater Burlington Area, Vermont | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
zeta
Activist
Member # 20185

Icon 1 posted      Profile for zeta     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I had the same sex ed as most of you -and I went to high school in Europe. It was pretty informative on the technical bits of intercourse -use condoms, avoid std's because they're nasty. All true, granted, but could have been learned from the instructions in a pack of condoms. It was pretty non-biased too, abstinence was not demanded.

It did only cover the avoiding of the negative side effects of hetero intercourse, though. Nothing about other sexual orientations or activities. Nothing about the reasons why someone *would* choose to have sex, eventually, and when would be a good time.

I was pretty well informed though, due to having stolen a book from my parents when I was about ten. Said book was actually a guide to improving boring marriages, the kind that presumably are the result of the kind of sex ed that thinks sexual intimacy is hetero intercourse only.

The book's theme was that sex is about ppl who like one another having a really good tim e together. (It is not about deadly disease or too-early pregnancy). Nothing is necessary and everything that both *genuinely* agree on is a good idea. It's, after all, supposed to be about mutual fun. The technical specs are just detail.

I feel that the attitude I gleaned from that book -nothing to be embarrassed about, all in good fun, be nice to partner and expect the same back, and no need to pretend to be an expert -if I don't know something and would like to, just ask -is entirely responsible for my early sex life having gone well, and I think that's what should be taught in schools. Not the technicalities (well those too, but extrapolation from human biology class gets one pretty far), but appreciation of self and partner.


Posts: 57 | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ketzicle
Neophyte
Member # 18620

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Ketzicle     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I did get a little of my sex ed. in high school, sometime during 5th grade. It lasted about a week. They didn't focus on contraceptive or anything -- they merely segregated the boys from the girls and made us watch videos about it.

However, this was some time ago.

It was later that I got my 'real' sex ed. It was at a place where troublesome kids were being rehabilitated, and many of them were rather promiscuous. (No, I was not one of them.) Therefore, the sex ed. mentors had to teach us things about condoms, STDs, etc. If they didn't, these kids would be in great danger.
I learned a lot of invaluable things from those classes, which were about once or twice a week for several weeks.

In those classes, they presented abstinance as an option. One that is definately better than not having sex at all, but one that not all of us were going to choose. (Or had chosen...) I'd estimate that only about 15-20% of those classes centered around abstinance and its benefits.

It sounds like the sex ed. class you had in school is an abstinance program. They don't usually cover topics such as condoms and birth control -- and if they do, they're sure to emphasize how 'horrible' and 'inaffective' they are.

It's a shame. Really.

But, after all, that's what Scarleteen's here for.

As for what schools should teach, in my opinion, are the classes that I took outside of school. Sure, it's good to emphasize abstinance, but I'll guarantee you not all students are going to take their little message to heart.

------------------
"Nail in my hand,
From my creator.
You gave me life now
Show me how to live."
~Audioslave, 'Show Me How To Live'


Posts: 14 | From: Minnesota, USA | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
daria319
Activist
Member # 19692

Icon 1 posted      Profile for daria319     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I attended a public high school in Georgia. Our sex ed was in health class, and it was pretty blunt.

The only thing ever said to discourage us from having sex came straight from the teacher -- "To be honest, sex is messy. Anyway, you're teenagers. You have enough to worry about already. Why bother with sex? Give it a while."

There was no "wait until marriage"talk. We had the "wait til you trust him/her" talk. I really appreciated it.


Posts: 407 | From: Georgia | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
IceCuzImCold
Neophyte
Member # 13802

Icon 1 posted      Profile for IceCuzImCold     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I am just now taking a Health class my Senior year in High School and BOY do I wish I had taken this class last winter!! I noticed most of you put that you took some sort of sex ed class in middle school so I guess the school system I've been in just stinks. But anyway we learn from a book the teacher starts a chapter the 1st was Wellness the 2nd was non-infectious diseases(heart probs, hypertension, stuff like that) and now we're on infectious diseases, the teacher writes all these subtopics on the boards and explains each as he goes along in pretty good detail and we can ask any questions we want and he does a pretty good job of explaining them. I don't know what the complete course will cover and its not a sex ed class its a health class so we will probably finish this chap. friday and be done with it, but i do wish that I had taken the course earlier, because you know that when you have sex you're taking a risk but to here those risks in full detail, you're just kicking yourself the entire time wondering what the hell you were thinking about when you did it. I was sick to my stomach.

------------------
Never spit in the wind--TRUST ME ON THIS ONE


Posts: 35 | From: Forestville, MD, USA | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
IceCuzImCold
Neophyte
Member # 13802

Icon 1 posted      Profile for IceCuzImCold     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I am just now taking a Health class my Senior year in High School and BOY do I wish I had taken this class last winter!! I noticed most of you put that you took some sort of sex ed class in middle school so I guess the school system I've been in just stinks. But anyway we learn from a book the teacher starts a chapter the 1st was Wellness the 2nd was non-infectious diseases(heart probs, hypertension, stuff like that) and now we're on infectious diseases, the teacher writes all these subtopics on the boards and explains each as he goes along in pretty good detail and we can ask any questions we want and he does a pretty good job of explaining them. I don't know what the complete course will cover and its not a sex ed class its a health class so we will probably finish this chap. friday and be done with it, but i do wish that I had taken the course earlier, because you know that when you have sex you're taking a risk but to here those risks in full detail, you're just kicking yourself the entire time wondering what the hell you were thinking about when you did it. I was sick to my stomach.

------------------
Never spit in the wind--TRUST ME ON THIS ONE


Posts: 35 | From: Forestville, MD, USA | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

  New Poll   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3