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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sexual Ethics and Politics » Porn consumers' faces on the Web

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Author Topic: Porn consumers' faces on the Web
Dzuunmod
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An anti-rape group in Louisville, in the American state of Kentucky has tactic from the anti-abortion camp and started posting the photos of adult business customers on the Web. The people going into a particular 'adult bookstore' in Louisville have been photographed from afar (or in some cases, had their licence plates photographed). The group - War-line - wants to rid these sorts of establishments from the area, because, they claim, they promote violence against women. Another group quoted in the article claims that violence against women is higher in the vicinity of these sorts of businesses. (Well then, violence against women downtown in my city should really be off the charts - but, I digress.)

The article's not exactly the pinnacle of journalism, I know, so let's ignore that and just talk about the tactic.

Is this sort of shaming tactic ever useful? Do these men (at least, they're all men from what I can see) deserve what they're getting? One of the anti-porn folks in the article readily admits that not all of the men frequenting the bookstore are going to abuse or rape a woman. That alone says to me that if a woman (or a man) is abused or raped, it's the perpetrators fault - not the fault of the porn.

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"Like a bat out of hell, time has come for you!"
-Ballad of a Comeback Kid, The New Pornographers


Posts: 1515 | From: Montreal, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
logic_grrl
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What disappoints me is when people supposedly campaigning against violence switch to an easier target - porn.

It seems to be easier to feel you're achieving something by attacking something which is already socially-denigrated, like porn, than to tackle the deep-rooted social attitudes that encourage rape.

Certainly, I think a lot of porn is misogynistic, offensive, and very sex-negative. But so is a lot of non-sexually-explicit material - which is often far, far more widely disseminated and socially-condoned.

I think this sort of tactic just perpetuates the attitude that sex and sexually explicit material are inherently dirty and dangerous to women.

And I think that attitude itself ties into a whole bundle of stereotypes which are actually very anti-feminist, very disempowering and damaging to women.

The idea that it's okay to shame and harrass people because they read or watch material you disapprove of is traditionally associated with intolerance towards women, minority groups, and anyone else who's seen as "deviant".

So I think it's extraordinarily naive to think that using this sort of tactic is going to promote a society which is healthy for women.

quote:
Another group quoted in the article claims that violence against women is higher in the vicinity of these sorts of businesses.

That may be true - because zoning laws and restrictions on where "adult stores" can be opened tend to force them into "sleazy" areas, where crime tends to be high anyway.


Posts: 6944 | From: UK | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MarvellousPurple
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Isn't it blatantly illegal to take pictures of others and publish them without their consent? The article said that because they're in a public place (and i guess the paparazzi makes a living off of this..), they can't have a reasonable expectation of privacy, but it still seems highly sketchy to me.

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got a haircut, got a silver tooth
tryin' to get myself arrested


Posts: 475 | From: Back in Providence, RI | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dzuunmod
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Here in Quebec, it certainly is illegal to take photos of someone without their consent. However, in a course on media and the law that I took some years back, we were told that this law is unique in North America.

Elsewhere, anyone in public is fair game.

After all, newspapers take pictures all the time of people who don't necessarily want their photos in the paper. TV cameras shoot people coming and going from courthouses all the time who obviously don't want to be seen on TV.

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"Like a bat out of hell, time has come for you!"
-Ballad of a Comeback Kid, The New Pornographers


Posts: 1515 | From: Montreal, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BruinDan
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quote:
Originally posted by Dzuunmod:
However, in a course on media and the law that I took some years back, we were told that this law is unique in North America.

You're right, I've never heard of a law outside of Quebec with the same purpose, and there are no American laws prohibiting the taking of someone's photograph either. I'm sure you could sue somebody civilly, as we've seen famous folk do against paparazzi, but that's about as far as it goes.

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BruinDan, "Number Three," PHOM

Beware the naked man who offereth you his pants.


Posts: 2727 | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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