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Author Topic: Shakespeare and his new look
Ella
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In the Globe and Mail, they reported that they'd discovered a new picture of Shakespeare as opposed to the only other one they have, in it he's young and it's pretty different from the classic shot of him. It's a picture that I at least could identify with the man who wrote all the comedies and love sonnets - he looks like he could have a good time! Has anyone actually seen the picture? or have a link to it? It makes me at least rethink my image of him, he becomes a little more like a real person from that picture.

There's some debate about it's authenticity but I at least would really like it to be authentic, because it looks like in my mind Shakespeare should look like.

[This message has been edited by Ella (edited 05-14-2001).]


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Mack
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I think Shakespare should remain classical.
In school we watched both versions of Romeo and Joliet(The 1960's one which was depicted in the 1500's and the Newer one which had that guy from Titanic).The Newer verison sucked big time. They updated the clothing and setting but kept the wording of Shakespare it was awful. If you ever seen to updated version you know what I mean. Dreadlocks,cars, and guns dont go well with Shakesparian English.

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Confused boy
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Yeah that film thought it was so clever, keeping the original speech in a modern setting. In fact it just came out as confusing and annoying. Perfectly reasonable to have Romeo and Juliet in a modern setting just as long as you update what there saying as well.

I just learnt recently actually that most experts believe Shakespeare was gay and its been considered for some time.


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Gumdrop Girl
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actually, if you really read into shakespeare, he's timeless. okay, so our language has evolved since the 15th century, but he writes such that a lot of the sitautions are still relevant today. Romeo and Juliet -- parents don't approve of new significant other. Othello (my favorite) jealousy, mistrust and deception lead to the downfall of the protagonist and all those around him. and his use of anachronism, like in Julius Caesar talking about chimneys and bells tolling the hour. very cool. five hundred years later, we still understand the guy.

------------------
i use angst


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Mack
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Still a Guy dressed up like a gang banger speaking in shakespare's words makes him look like a *** .

If they wanted to update the setting they should have changed shakespare's words to ebonics(dont get me started on that filth).


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Gaffer
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The only evidence of any homosexuality or bisexuality on Shakespeare's sonnets, which are adressed to either a fair young man or a lady, but much of that has been discounted because of how the word love has multiple meanings and all that silly linguistics stuff.

I love the music from the Romeo and Juliet movie (not the new one--I haven't seen it). Has anyone seen the new Hamlets or Macbeths?
I'm watching an old Macbeth in English right now. Yuck, which reminds me I have an in class essay on it on Wednesday, I should really be studying.

I would be interested in seeing the picture though.


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Beppie
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As for the Sonnets, the first two thirds of them are definitely addressed to a man, and I think they are definitely romantic in nature. Let's look at Sonnet 20:

A woman's face with nature's own hand painted,
Hast thou the master mistress of my passion,
A woman's gentle heart but not acquainted
With shifting change as is false women's fashion,
An eye more bright than theirs, less false in rolling:
Gilding the object whereupon it gazeth,
A man in hue all hues in his controlling,
Which steals men's eyes and women's souls amazeth.

And for a woman wert thou first created,
Till nature as she wrought thee fell a doting,
And by addition me of thee defeated,
By adding one thing to my purpose nothing.
But since she pricked thee out for women's pleasure,
Mine be thy love and thy love's use their treasure.

In this Sonnet Shakespeare writes about his feelings towards a man using the conventions of heterosexual love poetry. Many of the things he claims to love about his patron are things that are traditionally supposed to attract a man to a woman, although he clearly sees his patron as being superior to notions of females in that time. The fact that he is saying "you are a man, but I love you as though you were a woman" (since it's all in the terms of heterosexual convention) becomes even clearer in the sestet, which basically says, "you were going to be a woman, but nature gave you a penis, and so my love is screwed." This is especially apparent in "Because she pricked the out for women's pleasure"- the pun being on the word "prick", which was then, as it is now, slang for "penis".

It's fairly clear to me that the speaker of this poem is dealing with erotic feelings towards someone of his own gender, and feel unable to fulfil his desires due to the fact that the society in which he lives views such feelings as unnatural.

However, it doesn't really prove anything about Shakespeare's sexual orientation. He may well have been gay, but he was also writing for a patron- he had to write what his patron wanted, or he would have lost his livelihood. Personally, I think it's one of those things that we will just never know.


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BruinDan
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(sigh) All I can say is that there is nothing more attractive than a woman who knows her Shakespeare. English Majors of the world unite.

[This message has been edited by BruinDan (edited 09-25-2002).]


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Beppie
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Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,
men were deceivers ever. . .

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Gaffer
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Whatever, I was just repeating what I had heard in English. Will was a really strange genius, gay or straight or bi or pansexual. This was the guy who wrote about crossdressers falling in love and two teenagers in Verona. Actually, I'm starting to rethink this whole thing. Hmmm, I need some time to be alone now.
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Gaffer
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There was a big article about the picture today in the New York Times. Really neat stuff.
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