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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » EXPERT ADVICE » Emergencies and Crises » Birth Control, Diarrhea & Condom Slippage--is EC necessary?

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Author Topic: Birth Control, Diarrhea & Condom Slippage--is EC necessary?
pantses
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Hello,

I'm on birth control and taking my last active pill in my second pack tomorrow night. Earlier this month, about four hours after taking my second pill in the new pack, I had diarrhea. The Sronyx packet doesn't say anything specific about diarrhea except to "use a back-up method (such as condoms, foam, or sponge) until you check with your doctor or clinic." I emailed my gynecologist, and she responded: "you should be fine - very slight increase risk of pregnancy which is why we say use condoms for rest of this pill pack if you want to be absolutely certain as can be but this is low risk"

However, 2 nights ago, my boyfriend and I had a condom slip. There was no ejaculate in the condom, but it was off for a few seconds to a minute, and it was our second time that night having sex so I'm scared I may have been exposed to any residue/supersperm from his previous ejaculation.

Should I go buy emergency contraception? I've taken all of my pills this month within the same 15-minute window. I absolutely CANNOT get pregnant.

Thanks.

[ 12-30-2011, 09:17 PM: Message edited by: pantses ]

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Kachina
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Four hours after taking the pill is more than enough time to digest the pill, so I don't see a huge a cause for concern here, your pill is most likely still effective. Your risk of pregnancy is low, especially since he didnt ejaculate. Although since he did previously there is a risk of sperm in the precum. It's up to you if you want to take EC if you don't feel comfortable with the amount of risk.

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~Kat
Scarleteen Volunteer

Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, "We've always done it this way." I try to fight that. That's why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise. - Grace Hopper

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pantses
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I ended up calling a 24/7 nurse line at my university, and the woman I talked to did recommend EC because my doctor recommended a backup for the rest of this month, and that backup failed.

I took Next Choice last night about 30 minutes after my post and the second pill this morning 12 hours later. I highly doubt I'm pregnant/am telling myself not to worry because I've literally done all I can. I'll update this thread if my period is late.

Thanks a bunch.

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pantses
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My period isn't due yet, but I'm updating the thread because I'm confused about what to expect in terms of my period and starting my new pack of birth control.

I'm only in my second pack of birth control. Today starts my inactive pill week. Last month, my period came 4 days after my first inactive pill day. I was hoping my period would come around January 4th.

However, from the Next Choice website:
quote:
In most instances, your next menstrual period will come at or within 1 week of its expected time. If it is delayed beyond 1 week, you could be pregnant.
Will being on the inactive pill week of my birth control MAKE my period come this week? Or is it normal if the EC makes it come as late as the 11th? Would my period technically be on time if it came even 2 weeks from today?

Another quote from the Q&A section of the Next Choice website:
quote:
13. When can I begin taking my regular birth control pills after taking Next Choice?

Be sure to check with your healthcare provider for instructions on how to take your oral contraceptive. Follow the directions for use of your usual contraceptive.

There's nothing in my birth control (Sronyx)'s patient information packet about what to do if I take EC. I took my last two birth control pills 1) on the same night I took the first Next Choice pill and 2) last night, after I had taken my second Next Choice pill that morning.

Even if I don't get my period in the placebo week because the EC could delay it, do I just start a new pack a week from today like I would any other month? If I do that before my period comes, wouldn't that just delay my period another month?

Could you guys please fill me in on what to expect after taking EC on normal birth control?

Thanks so much.

[ 01-01-2012, 04:19 PM: Message edited by: pantses ]

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Robin Lee
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The bleeding that happens on the placebo week is not technically a menstrual period. It's often called a withdrawal bleed, and is just the shedding of whatever uterine lining has built up while taking the pills the rest of the month. IN other words, the "period" comes *only* because it's a placebo week. From everything I know,you can start your regular bc pills when you usually would, but because you did take the EC, it wouldn't be a bad idea to talk to a health care professional just to make sure. Could you call the nurse line you called before?

This info about BC pills might be helpful to you in understanding withdrawal bleeds. I should add that while there are no studies confirming the safety of long-term menstrual suppression, you shouldn't need to wait for a bleed to happen before taking your pills again. It's only one month, and many people experience variation in their withdrawal bleeds. Again, because you did take the EC it's worth talking to someone who is qualified to give you medical advice.

Here's the article about bc pills.

Three questions about taking the birth control pill (and plenty of answers)

[ 01-01-2012, 04:51 PM: Message edited by: Robin Lee ]

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Robin

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pantses
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Thanks for all the information. To be sure, I did call the nurse line again and the woman I spoke to said that I shouldn't start my new pack of birth control if I don't get a withdrawal bleed. But hopefully my gynecologist will have been able to give me her own advice before I would have to worry about that.

Based on the dates of my periods from September until now, the nurse told me I should expect my period to come by the 6th and recommended a first response pregnancy test to calm me down any time until then. I'm not sure how easily I could get one--I'm home without a car and my boyfriend's back at his school already.

I guess I'm just going to wait it out/figure out how to get a pregnancy test, maybe with some of my friends still at home.

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pantses
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Okay sorry guys... It's still stressing me out. :/

It would be nice just to speak about the chance of pregnancy (read: anxiety) in general. I know my risk is low, and normally I wouldn't worry because we have been using condoms and hormonal birth control. But I'm not sure if the combined risks of being sick 4 hours after taking my second pill in the pack and the condom slipping are low enough to not worry about, if that makes sense. It also doesn't help that I don't have schoolwork to keep my mind off of it.

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Kachina
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Even if your birth control lost its effectiveness Plan B reduces your chances of pregnancy significantly.

http://www.scarleteen.com/birth_control_bingo_emergency_contraception

--------------------
~Kat
Scarleteen Volunteer

Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, "We've always done it this way." I try to fight that. That's why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise. - Grace Hopper

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pantses
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How would I figure out the rate of effectiveness by combining typical use of condoms, the pill, and EC together?

edit: is my math right on this? (this is slightly embarrassing for me!)
I would multiply the failure rate of condoms with typical use (because we had a slip) (.15) by the failure rate of pills with typical use (.08) and by the failure rate of EC (.25) to get a .003, a .3% failure rate for my situation.
Or would I not factor in condoms at all to get .02, a 2% failure rate?

Thanks again.

[ 01-02-2012, 12:06 AM: Message edited by: pantses ]

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Kachina
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Unfortunately math is not my strong point at all... We have the effectiveness rates of two methods though here:

The Buddy System: Effectiveness Rates for Backing Up Your Birth Control With a Second Method


Also, EC effectiveness rates are calculated a bit differently, instead of how many woman get pregnant per year of use (since EC isn't supposed to be used as a primary methods or for a whole year) it is instead calculated based on how many women would have gotten pregnant if they didn't take EC

--------------------
~Kat
Scarleteen Volunteer

Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, "We've always done it this way." I try to fight that. That's why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise. - Grace Hopper

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pantses
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I actually have been very well acquainted with your buddy system article for years; it's what got me comfortable with the idea of heterosexual intercourse because I knew I could backup birth control with condoms when we were ready. And, excluding this whole fiasco, knowing that both of us are taking active measures to minimize our risk has been a great experience. [Smile] We haven't had sex a LOT since we started, but having those statistics has directly contributed to me enjoying it more. So thank you Scarleteen.

& so I'm guessing it's probably not feasible to factor the difference in EC statistics to my failure rate calculation. Maybe once I take statistics.

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