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» Got Questions? Get Answers. » EXPERT ADVICE » Emergencies and Crises » Clitoris Nerve Damage?!

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Author Topic: Clitoris Nerve Damage?!
xxKristii17
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Member # 62155

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I am very worried.

Before I starting using an Electric Toothbrush to masturbate (heard a lot of positive sayings about it), my Clitoris sensitivity was through the roof--I could not close my legs without being overwhelmed with sensitivity and I could not directly touch my Clitoris after stimulating it.

In Nov, after two infections I had due to soap accidentally getting into my Vagina, my Clitoris Sensitivity deceased (or arousal, one of them--don't really know the difference). Now I can stimulate my Clitoris, still feel pleasure but it isn't how it used to be and am worried that I caused damage with the use of that toothbrush. After an orgasm, I can close my legs and walk like nothing has ever happened when before I could barely walk due to the sensitivity.

The odd part of this is, during the first time my sensitivity decreased, I was using my hands to stimulate myself. When I used the toothbrush, I would have periods of numbness in the Clitoris and thought it was SUPPOSE to happen (since that was the way I learned how to orgasm). I do not feel pain when being stimulated, I can feel pleasure with oral and enjoy being played with. If I do have some form or degree of nerve damage, is it good that I feel no pain and should I stop touching myself or enaging in activity for a few months to a year? (It's been 8 months since my sensitivity decreased).

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I love you Steph. <3

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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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It is highly unlikely you have nerve damage.

What is much more likely is just that you got used to that level of stimulation, so it feels less intense than it used to. As well, those periods of numbness were likely just kind of maxing out on that stimulation, something that can happen with any part of the body and is temporary.

For example, start clapping your hands. You feel that first clap, right? Pretty strongly, probably. But the more and more you clap, the less and less you feel it, and eventually, your hands will feel kind of numb. Then you'll stop, they will feel numb-ish or like pins and needles for a bit, but shortly, they'll start to feel back to normal.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
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Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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xxKristii17
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Member # 62155

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Thank you, Heather.

I just heard that loss of sensitivity (or arousal) is caused by nerve damage and as I used an electric toothbrush, I am afraid I've done something irreversible.

I am eighteen, am with a woman and very much want to explore with toys but I am scared that I will make my Clitoris worse? ..

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I love you Steph. <3

Posts: 53 | From: Halifax | Registered: Apr 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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I have never seen any data to support that masturbation with any kind of vibrator can cause or has ever caused nerve damage. Rather, what I see around that instead is a lot of urban mythology, not anything supported by study or science.

By all means, you can always double-check with a gynecologist. But you also need to know that the kind of super-shock sensitivity we first feel when we start to explore our genitals is going to change over time once we're out of that kind of sexual infancy, as it were. As wel, we can get used to certain kinds of stimulus, so things can feel less intense.

If you ever find you feel habituated to a certain kind of stimulus, so it feels like less than you'd like, or bums out other, less intense ways of stimulation, what you can just do is be sure to mix it up. In other words, don't use toys or a certain kind of toy all the time, or always use them on the highest setting: take turns to go without them or use lower settings.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About MeGet our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67930 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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