Donate Now
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Got Questions? Get Answers. » EXPERT ADVICE » Ask Scarleteen » Newly Clockwork Periods

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Newly Clockwork Periods
Roxie102
Peer Ambassador
Member # 72015

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Roxie102     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm almost 19 and have been having my period for 6 years. I was having "regular" periods for most of that time, but they were always between 32 and 35 days. I was also having very painful breasts for a week before every period. I had a wonky period, about 10 days later than usual, in May, and ever since then my periods have gotten uber-regular, as in, always starting during the night, always at 30 days. Also, there has been little breast pain, but I now can very reliably tell when I've started because I get vulvar heaviness and cramping, which has also gotten progressively worse than ever before, enough to require pain meds. My question is, is this unusual? I've never experienced clockwork periods, and I'm finding this extreme regularity a bit "irregular" for me.
Posts: 255 | Registered: Jul 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
So, what's most typical with menstrual periods is for the first few years -- and sometimes more -- to be more irregular than the years after. That doesn't account, mind, for pregnancies or breastfeeding, both of which, if and when they occur, will tend to massively change menstrual cycles for a long time. That also doesn't take other health or lifestyle issues into account, nor what tends to happen once menopause is on the horizon later on.

With cramping, that usually decreases after the first few years of menstruating, so if you have been finding that to increase for you, I'd just check in with your sexual/reproductive healthcare provider about it. If they don't see any physical reason for increased menstrual pain -- like PCOS or endo, for instance -- then I'd look at your lifestyle issues to see if you can't find culprit, like how you eat during and around your period, sleep, levels of activity, etc.

Mind, it is August, so with the timing of your cycles, this exactly every 30 days may or may not hold. While there's nothing to worry about with a cycle that regular, over more months, it'd be more common to have some deviation with cycles or a day or two sometimes.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67973 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Roxie102
Peer Ambassador
Member # 72015

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Roxie102     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I had an appointment a few months ago and told my doctor I had been cramping, but she said as long as an OTC pain reliever was working, it was nothing to worry about. Also though, I've never had a pelvic exam; last time she seemed to be in a hurry, and since I answered that I was not sexually active, she told me it could wait. (I know now that this was wrong even though I've never had intercourse, so I probably should go back for an exam.)
Posts: 255 | Registered: Jul 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
One thing to often bear in mind, too, is that our level of tolerance to pain can change throughout our life. I'd agree that if OTC analgesics are working fine, we're clearly not talking about severe pain, so this likely isn't any cause for concern. And it's also entirely possible your tolerance has changed as you've grown, which is fairly typical.

With the pelvic, the standard recommendation now is that pelvic exams and paps start either:
• Within a year or two of someone becoming sexually active (not just intercourse, any kind of genital sex)
• At the age of 21 if someone has not been sexually active before then, or
• If any health issues arise which facilitate a need for those exams

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67973 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3

Google
Search Scarleteen