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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Safer Sex & Birth Control » Going to get BC for the first time concern

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Author Topic: Going to get BC for the first time concern
Arya
Neophyte
Member # 42517

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I'm quite a bit older than I was when I last posted here, but you provided great information for me when I was a young teen and I hope you would be willing help me again.

I am 22 now, and in January started my first sexual relationship with my (older) boyfriend of 6 months. It went very well, he was very gentle and patient through the next several times until my hymen finally broke. We used, and still use condoms, every time. There was recently a time where we thought we didn't have one that almost led to bad decisions. Luckily, he was in better control than I was.

Partly for that reason I feel ready to phase them out and go on hormonal BC, and so I have an appointment for myself, and an STD screening appointment for him made next week. (didn't even have to ask-- he wanted it. Points for him.) I am concerned and have some questions about the process though. We are going to a clinic similar to PP, and I want to be sure that just because they're cheaper doesn't mean they won't listen to my concerns.

I want to be able to talk about my worries about it with the doctor and have them listen. I am healthy, no acne problems, no PMS problems, no other reason to go on the pill, and I have always reacted strongly to medications. So I know that whatever method it is, I need a low dose. I'm well researched and informed. I'm not a 16 year old that they can just tell anything to and I'll believe it cos I want to have sex. (Not knocking the perfectly responsible teenagers I know are out there, but I know plenty that aren't, as well.)Are they going to listen to me and help me make the correct choice, or do I just get asked a few health questions and thrown a prescription for the same pill they give everyone?

I would rather use condoms forever than become depressed, or lose my libido, or otherwise stop being myself. I am leery of doctors and their attitudes anyway, but I want to be reassured that, as a general rule, they're going to help me. Are there any particular questions I should ask, or anything else I should know?

It's long, and I know I'm not a "teen," but I'm still young and embarking on the same adventure as the rest, so I hope you'll help. Thanks.

Posts: 4 | From: USA | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

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Arya: have you walked through Birth Control Bingo yet? If not, doing that should help you narrow down what methods are likely to fit your needs and wants, and best suit you. When you have a good idea about what you want and think will work best for you, you can then share that information with your healthcare provider, get their input, and then jointly choose a method.

In terms of the quality of care you get, that generally will just really vary based on a given practitioner. In other words, any given clinic may have some doctors and nurses who are very responsive and client-centered, and some who aren't so great in that regard. But in any setting, the more you can walk in assertive, with a sound basis of knowledge on your own, and be prepared to advocate strongly for yourself, it's generally going to be all good.

And should you ever NOT get the standard of care you're entitled to, you always can make clear you're not getting it and want a different provider.

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Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
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Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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Arya
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Member # 42517

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I did look at that, thank you. I feel comfortable with several of the options listed there, and will look into them based on what this place offers. I guess my primary concern is that I see people who had to switch from pill to pill because one particular kind would not work for them. I just want to know that my provider will work with me, not just five me the prescription for the same one they give everyone.

For a clinic like that, could I really ask for a different provider if I'm uncomfortable with the one they give? Even though it's low cost or free?

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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

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It is actually pretty normal for any of us to have to try more than one method of birth control, or more than one brand of a given method (when there is more than one), to find what's right for us.

Often, providers will tend to start with brands of pills, if you're doing the pill, that are mainstays, and which tend to work best for most people, or which they personally like using with most patients.

A provider generally can't know much of the time what brand is or isn't going to work for someone until they try it, in part because the differences between brands tend to be pretty subtle. So, a provider is going to rely on your input once you have used a given pill to hone what's best for you. But until you try one, it's very tough to have that information, know what I mean?

And yes, even at a low-cost or free clinic you have rights as a patient, and those include the right to a provider you feel comfortable with. [Smile]

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Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Arya
Neophyte
Member # 42517

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Okay, so back with another question.

My visit went great. [Smile] The staff was wonderful and understanding of my fears surrounding the exam (my first was very traumatic) and they answered every question I threw at them. The boyfriend is STD free, so we've got the green light once I officially start it.

We decided that nuvaring was a good choice for me to start with, and I am due to insert my first one within a few days. I was reading my instructions and looking at the things I need to be careful about taking or using while I'm on it. Most of it didn't surprise me, but I didn't expect to see acetimetaphin or ascorbic acid on there.

I'm not too worried about acetimetaphin, I'll just take Advil. But you need vitamin C to live. How much is too much? Do I need to use backup if I forget and have a glass of orange juice in the morning? There's no way I can avoid every food that contains it. I tried looking it up for myself, but all google can tell me is that I'd better avoid it, because here are these women who got pregnant cos they had grapefruit juice every day while they were on the ring.

The clinic is closed until the day I'm due to start my period, so I thought I'd see if you know. Thanks so much.

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-Jill
Scarleteen Volunteer
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As I understand it, normal amounts of vitamin C as found in food shouldn't be a problem. Taking supplements or mega doses, i.e. taking vitamin C like a drug, for any reason are where the problems start to arise.

I wouldn't give up orange juice or delay using the because of this, but I did find this number on Nuvaring's website if you'd like more information: 1-877-NUVARING (I'd call myself but it's only available Monday through Friday EST so it's too late here.)

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I would have girls regard themselves not as adjectives but as nouns. --Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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Arya
Neophyte
Member # 42517

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I just wanted to let you know, in case anyone else ever wonders,(who would wonder about this besides me, but anyway) that I called, and for my question they redirected me to Schering-Plough Healthcare Products: 1-800-526-4099.

Apparently no one has a direct guideline for ascorbic acid intake, but I was reassured that my diet probably didn't need to change. Too much vitamin C will increase your side effects, but they're assuming that that's the amount of a daily mega-vitamin, or a grapefruit diet, etc.

Thank you for all your help! I should be starting my first one today (eep!) and hopefully I don't turn into a raging basketcase or anything. It's hard to do anything medical when you're an obsessive researcher like me, but you all helped me as much as I knew you would. Thanks again. [Smile]

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-Jill
Scarleteen Volunteer
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Thanks for sharing that answer!

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I would have girls regard themselves not as adjectives but as nouns. --Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Posts: 3641 | From: Truckee, CA, US | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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