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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sex in Media: Books, Magazines, Films, TV & More » Your favourite Queer films? (Page 2)

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Author Topic: Your favourite Queer films?
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Turns out there are a lot of films called Two of Us, so I should specify I meant the 1987 one from Brit TV. I love it to pieces. It's about male bisexuality, about male longings for romance, about love, about gay-bashing, about sorting out relationships, about relationships being about other things than sex, about unfair age-of-consent laws. A teenaged gay boy, asked "Do you think you could never be with a girl?" replies "I didn't say that. I'm happy as I am." That's so much more affirming than the can't-help-it-was-born-that-way discourse that dominates now. A teenaged bi boy, when his boyfriend is embarrassed about hugging in public, says "Footballers do it, don't they? Thousands watch them. Millions." I so much prefer that to the somewhat stereotyped quasi-gender roles that prevail in the more recent films Beautiful Thing and Get Real.

Yeah, go see that movie. [Smile]

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jlaformab
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I've recently completing shooting a queer feature film, funded and filmed entirely in Chicago!
"And They Call It Puppy Love" tells the story of Vincent and Craig: different men from different social spheres who cannot deny their unlikely feelings for each other. As their romance blossoms, trust and dependency are formed, but one night is all it takes to start chipping away at the foundation of their relationship. And when Craig finds himself in mortal danger, he turns to Vincent with an almost impossible request...
We are now in need of support to help get our film finished and in theaters and on the web for everyone to see! Please take a look at our funding campaign and consider helping:

http://www.indiegogo.com/And-They-Call-It-Puppy-Love

If you can't afford to support us financially, please consider following us on facebook or twitter!

THANKS!

http://www.facebook.com/pages/And-They-Call-It-Puppy-Love/150342631683713?ref=ts
http://twitter.com/PuppyLoveMovie
http://www.atcipl.com

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quote:
Originally posted by September:
Mein Freund aus Faro

I really want to see this. Also on my must-watch list are Tomboy (the newly released one), Órói, Ang tatay kong nanay, Macho Dancer, Le voyage à Deauville, Blue Jeans ou Du beurre aux allemands, Drôle de Félix, La chatte à deux têtes, The Leather Boys, The Fruit Machine, and most André Téchiné movies.

Somebody mentioned The Celluloid Closet? Also a good watch. I liked The Lavender Lens: 100 years of celluloid queers a lot as well.

quote:
Originally posted by jlaformab:
"And They Call It Puppy Love"

...sounds great! Will keep an eye out.

[ 04-08-2011, 02:34 PM: Message edited by: bump on a log ]

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AB
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LOST AND DELIRIOUS!!! unless i missed someone saying it? BEST MOVIE I HAVE EVER SEEN. ever.
also, High Art.

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If nobody here's familiar with the queer films that came out of early-twentieth-century Germany, go and look. Anders als die Andern, Die Büchse der Pandora, Geschlect in Fesseln, Mädchen in Uniform, Michael, Tagebuch einer Verlorenen, and there must be more...
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Ha, just noticed inadvertent pun in the above.
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Are we counting kinky as queer? Because I was deeply impressed by a 2006 German film called Verfolgt (English title Hounded or Punish Me). It was directed by a woman and written by another woman, and both the director and the lead actress are out lesbians, so that's cool to start with. It won the Golden Leopard at the Locarno film festival.

Now, the relationship depicted here is emphatically NOT 'healthy'. We have a married 50-year-old woman whose only child, a daughter, has recently left home, and who works as a competent and well-respected probation officer for teenagers. We have a 16-year-old boy, one of the probationees she supervises, who's been in a juvenile facility for three years for robbery etc. He decides he wants a BDSM relationship with her with himself as a submissive, and follows her around till he gets what he wants, although she at first tells him in no uncertain terms to leave her alone. She has never been involved in BDSM before but finds she enjoys the role of dominant and gradually an impossible love grows between them. Also, I know that in BDSM you're supposed to have safewords and they don't, both being BDSM novices in their different ways, although they don't do anything too extreme. So yeah...if the boy, Jan, were to post on these boards, he'd probably be told to get out of the relationship posthaste.

But. I hear that many women have submission fantasies. I don't, nor do I have domination fantasies. The whole idea of myself being involved in something like that, even if only in my imagination, is not only alien to me, but frightening and repulsive. Just...no, as they say. But this film managed to make BDSM desires and their enaction understandable to me, to make me sympathise. And from what I've read from actual BDSM practitioners, the BDSM scenes, which are filmed in a restrained manner, were realistic. I can't vouch for that, but there's realism everywhere else, such as in the friendship between Jan and a fellow male probationee his own age. The film can just touch lightly on something and make it convincing. And there's a powerful indirect statement near the end about the difference between consensual BDSM and nonconsensual violence.

Tolerance in this area means how accepting you are of other people's sexual likes which you do not share. Verfolgt made me a lot more understanding of people into BDSM.

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Now for the French list...The French are good at this kind of thing. I have seen and liked: Zéro de conduite, Les amitiés particulières, Une histoire sans importance, Juste une question d'amour, Un amour à taire, Avant que j'oublie, Le temps qui reste, Son frère, Tout contre Léo, Les roseaux sauvages, La ville dont le prince est un enfant and Nous étions un seul homme.

[ 04-25-2011, 08:33 PM: Message edited by: bump on a log ]

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Jill2000Plus
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Tokyo Godfathers - Animated film about three homeless people living in Tokyo, one of whom identifies themselves as either a gay man or a woman (or rather, it seems like they identify as a transgendered woman who is attracted to men but regret that they are not "biologically female") throughout the film, (the other two are a guy in his 40s/50s with an estranged daughter and a 13 year old girl) their name is Hana and they're a really awesome character, in the movie these three people find a baby in a dumpster on christmas eve and try to return it to it's parents. Please see it, it's a wonderful film.

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Sounds really, really interesting. Will see if I can get it off Lovefilm or something.
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eryn_smiles
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Has anyone seen a short film called "HETERO"- what did you think?

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Where might I find it? Can't seem to dig it up on the internet.

Scratch that, found it!

I wasn't expecting much of this as I've seen the same idea done rather badly in two films, one short, one full-length. This one was a lot better. I liked that the kids weren't sanitised: they swore, they got drunk, they had impulsive sex. They seemed remarkably unconcerned about the legal consequences -- life in prison if I heard right! -- and why wouldn't they know about condoms? Exclusively having homosex doesn't get rid of STI risks. Also, the acting could have been better. But on the whole I liked it. This is the sort of thing that works best as a short film; the idea is too thin for a full-length film.

Other GLBTQ-themed short films I like: Trevor, James, Private Life, 13 ans, Un beau jour un coiffeur (One Fine Day a Hairdresser), Daniel endormi, Tre somre (Three Summers), Tout le monde est parfait, Hoi Maya (Hi Maya), Last Exit, 5 Telephone Conversations, Available Men, Amor crudo (Raw Love), Bikini, Davy and Stu, Le prisonnier, Du même sang, Chicken, Kysset som fikk snøen til å smelte (A Kiss in the Snow), Paginas de Menina (Pages of a Girl), Café com leite (You, Me and Him), A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Funeral, Bugcrush, Bobbycrush, Dottie Gets Spanked, Bennys Gym.

[ 06-08-2011, 07:36 PM: Message edited by: bump on a log ]

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eryn_smiles
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Hello! I sort of liked it too. But yes, why didn't they know what condoms were? And what happens to bisexual people in these films, why are they invisible?

Since you like french films, have you seen "Gigola"? I thought it was pretty hot, albeit somewhat depressing.

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Jill2000Plus
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I am awed by your depth of knowledge, I haven't even watched Brokeback Mountain yet, though I have it on DVD, in fact the only queer films I actually have seen that I remember seeing are the aforementioned Tokyo Godfathers, But I'm a Cheerleader, The History Boys, and My Beautiful Launderette, I don't know whether Vicky Cristina Barcelona and Midnight Cowboy would count, I have some other stuff on DVD and VHS waiting to be watched, but I'm veery slow at working through my DVD collection so far, my best conversation topic is "wasn't Ken FABULOUS in Toy Story 3".

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Heather
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quote:
And what happens to bisexual people in these films, why are they invisible?
Actually, even in Brokeback Mountain, often called a gay movie/book by straight people, at least one of the two characters' sexuality is very much presented as fluid. It seems to me that in that film, bisexuality is very much present in the character of Jack, at a minimum.

Some other films with bisexual characters? Cabaret, The Color Purple, Y tu mamá también (a film I LOVE), Transamerica, Velvet Goldmine, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, The Pillow Book, My Own Private Idaho, High Art, Go Fish and Frida. If you want just one good TV example, Torchwood (UK) is all over it. So was the US show Nip/Tuck.

[ 06-09-2011, 11:56 AM: Message edited by: Heather ]

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Heather
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And Jill2000Plus, I totally agree about Ken in the last Toy Story, even though I think Barbie was even more so. [Smile]

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Jill2000Plus
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Barbie was very fabulous, unfortunately they didn't give her a extensive wardrobe, so she didn't get to show that aspect of it off as much, I liked how she had legwarmers though, I thought that was a nice 80s style touch. Personally I think it would have been awesome if she was a racial minority Barbie.

[ 06-11-2011, 07:37 AM: Message edited by: Jill2000Plus ]

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Always knock before entering my room when I am in there alone, as I may be doing all sorts of wonderfully thrilling things that I'd rather you didn't see.

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eryn_smiles
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Has anyone seen Tomboy? Its a french one this year, exploring gender identity. I thought it was sweet but predictable. The child actors were very good.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHebAaxnxKM

I also liked Miss Representation. About portrayal of women in media.

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Really, really want to see Tomboy, but can't find a cinema showing it.
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quote:
Originally posted by Jill2000Plus:
The History Boys

Liked it a lot -- well, I'm an Alan Bennett fan, I would. It does come across as a bit of a filmed play, which after all is what it is, but having been in Posner's and Irwin's shoes, I found the psychological truth piercing and painful when I saw it on screen, in a way it hadn't been when I was just reading the play.

I'm in two minds about My Beautiful Laundrette. On the one hand, I have seen much better films, and the acting of the Asian lead is pretty awful -- but it's important for the number of serious problems it addresses, and for a relatively rare example of a gay happy ending, and an interracial gay happy ending at that. So on balance I would recommend it.

But I'm a Cheerleader is always good for a laugh. [Smile]

Of the films I've mentioned, Une histoire sans importance, Les roseaux sauvages, Nous étions un seul homme, F***ing Åmål, Sunday, Bloody Sunday, Personal Best and Two of Us all deal with bisexuality to some degree. Two of Us is notable for having a sixteen-year-old male protagonist who actually calls himself bisexual.

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Jill2000Plus
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This isn't a film, it's a TV show, but there's an anime series called Wandering Son about two transgendered teenagers (one a boy, one a girl), and it's excellent and it's streaming legally for free in Japanese with English subtitles on a website called Crunchyroll (they used to have illegal streams, but a few years ago they started only having ones officially authorised by the japanese companies and money goes to the artists from the ads during the videos or if you have a subscription they get money from that), though there is no English subtitled (or dubbed) DVD release.

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Always knock before entering my room when I am in there alone, as I may be doing all sorts of wonderfully thrilling things that I'd rather you didn't see.

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AponiKanti
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wow, I'm totally gonna have to look up some of these movies! I have lots of non-straight friends and have recently come to realize that I myself am bisexual, though I have an exclusive relationship with a boyfriend. However, I know me and plenty of my friends would love some of these movies. I hope at least some of them are on netflix!
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bump on a log
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quote:
Originally posted by eryn_smiles:
Has anyone seen Tomboy? Its a french one this year, exploring gender identity. I thought it was sweet but predictable. The child actors were very good.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHebAaxnxKM

Recently seen it. Being on the FtM side myself and also a fan of Sciamma's previous film Naissance des pieuvres, I loved it. Yes, I suppose you could say it was predictable, but what I liked was what it does on the way to the place it ends up, if you follow me. Sciamma's filmmaking, even at its most emotional, has a detached and analytical quality to it that I really like. In this film she deftly says a lot of things about gender stereotypes, etc. Apparently the film is going to be shown in schools in France! I'm pleased to find that out.

Part of my personal reaction to the film was to be stunned at just how social these kids' existence is. At their age I was always alone. Your average person lives such a social life, gets such a lot of social practice that I never got. I also enjoyed watching the relationship between the sisters and between the father and his daughter/son, never having had such relationships myself. And Laure/Mickaël, the scorer of goals at football and winner of fights, is someone I wish I had been at ten, someone I still wish I were, in fact, but can never be. Had I watched the film at that age, ze would have been my hero. Ze kind of is anyway.

The only thing that made me a bit uncomfortable was not in the film itself, but in the way Sciamma talks about it. Sciamma is openly lesbian, and though she was something of a tomboy as a child she is not butch and has never identified as anything but female. She says that Laure/Mickaël can be interpreted as transgendered or not, it's up to you, but she talks about Laure/Mickaël 'pretending' to be a boy, about a lie, a game... She casually says that this is the last period when Laure/Mickaël's body will permit hir to pass as a boy, and hearing that I shuddered internally, remembering my own traumatic puberty, flinching in ancipation of what puberty will do to Laure/Mickaël. Puberty is bad news for trans kids. Sciamma doesn't seem very aware of this -- well, why would she be, she isn't trans. But what I'm saying is that she seems to have made a film about someone who may very well be a transboy while seeing it largely through the lens of lesbianism, not of being transgender. Hence the ending scene, which made me a bit uncomfortable. I thought that, if Sciamma really wanted to leave things open to interpretation, it could have ended on a more ambiguous note. Sciamma claims that the ending is open to interpretation anyway, which it is, but it's just the way she does it...it's that lens of lesbianism rather than transidentity again.

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Further to what I said above about the film being shown in schools in France: I always swore up and down that when I grew up I would remember what childhood is really like, and I don't for one minute think that the film will lead to a wonderful spread of tolerance. I think a lot of kids, and teachers, will be bored by it and by the mandatory class discussions that will follow. I think a whole lot of kids will snicker and crack jokes and use "tomboy" (a new word for the French) as an insult and generally make fun of the film for while, then forget it without its having made a dent. That will be by a long way the majority reaction. I would bet a lot of money on that. But in some class somewhere there will be a kid with gender identity worries who will see him/herself on screen for the first time, and that kid is going to be done a whole lot of good by the movie.
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A fair few polyamorous people consider themselves queer, so even though there's not a trace of homosexuality or gender variance in it, let us include Agnès Varda's third film, Le Bonheur (Happiness), a bright, visually unusual film about open relationships, cheerful and straightforward on one level but with some disturbing stuff going on under the surface.
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I'm dying to see Romeos and Gun Hill Road, both new films about transgender teenagers in the middle of physical transition -- hormones, but no surgery yet. In the former the main character is a gay FtM boy in Cologne, Germany; in the latter she is a straight MtF girl in New York, of Puerto Rican extraction. Both films have gotten some pretty good, though not brilliant, reviews. Both seem to represent a new generation, if you will, of trans-themed films, one focussing on the practicalities of physical and legal transition and offering a bit more hope than the trans-themed films of yore.
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A few more thoughts on 'Tomboy'. Sciamma (the filmmaker; openly lesbian, not particularly 'butch') says that when she was a kid, in the eighties, short hair for girls was in, so she had a short haircut and would sometimes be asked if she was a boy or a girl, though that wasn't what she was trying for.

All well and good if the film had been set back when Sciamma was growing up. But it's set in our day (is it? I think so, but I did find the absence of video games odd -- I've known few kids who preferred outdoor play to video games all or even most of the time) and little girls wearing short hair these days is just very seldom done. Sciamma says that when she was casting, the little girls she auditioned became alarmed at the prospect of having to cut their hair off for the role. That should've told her something. For a ten-year-old female-bodied child like Laure/Mickaël to wear boys' clothes and a boy's haircut, even though it's not a crew cut, is a big deal, a big statement. We're told in the film that the family have moved around a lot. Laure/Mickaël must therefore have gotten the "Are you a boy or a girl?" question a lot, in her various new neighbourhoods and new schools -- growing up in the nineties, I got asked that on the playground myself, though my hair was always at least to my collar. I remember that my hair was my badge of femaleness, of normalcy; that when asked, instead of answering I turned around to show the asker(s) its length. Yeah, ze must have gotten that question a lot, ze must have been read as a boy, ze must have been teased about being such a 'boyish girl' -- on the school playground by kids in other classes at least, supposing that when ze was younger ze had less freedom to play with the others in the neighbourhood without hir mother introducing hir.

Looked at this way, it seems that when once again Laure/Mickaël arrives in a new neighbourhood and once again ze's mistaken for a boy, this time ze thinks, in effect, what the hell, I'm going for it -- hence in part the happiness, the vertiginous sense of liberation ze finds in hir new role. And when ze fights the boy who pushed hir sister, for once ze's fighting as a boy, not fighting because ze's been teased for being such a tomboy. Not that I expect the film to undertake excavations of Laure/Mickaël's past. It's not that kind of film. But a quick line or two mentioning that past would have helped a lot.

I'm not sure though that Sciamma considered Laure/Mickaël's past. Which is fair enough. It depends on the kind of film you want to make. Hers is very realistic in some ways, notably the portrayal of the kids' games, but in other ways it's not primarily a realist film: it's an analysis of gender roles. All well and good. But though Sciamma says that her protagonist can be interpreted any way you like, I think that Sciamma's lesbianism predisposes her to put a lesbian slant on the question, as my transgenderism predisposes me to put a transgender slant on the question. Of the end, Sciamma said that in telling Lisa that hir name is Laure, after which Laure/Mickaël smiles, Laure/Mickaël is realising that ze doesn't have to lie to be who ze is. Which kind of stunned me, because if you were assigned female at birth and you feel like a boy, present as a boy and choose the name Mickaël for yourself, then Mickaël is your name and a boy is what you are. In a way, of course, Laure/Mickaël is lying by doing that, but if ze is transgender, then in another way ze isn't. Which brings me back to my original point: that Sciamma has made a film about a person who may well be transgender without really considering what being transgender feels like. Lord knows there's enough information out there on trans kids. She could've done a little bit of research.

Mind you, I love the film, I admire Sciamma's work (she also made 'Water Lilies' and the short film 'Pauline'), I highly recommend it. This-all is just...something to bear in mind.

[ 11-27-2011, 07:08 AM: Message edited by: bump on a log ]

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bump on a log
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This is going to sound odd, but The Aristocats.

I have less of a history with Disney than many. When I was little I went through something of a Little Mermaid phase: I got my mother to buy me a Little Mermaid board book and I later had a casette of songs from the movie together with another storybook of the movie that you followed along in while playing the casette periodically. But I never actually saw the movie till I was grown up! While still small I watched Peter Pan and Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree over and over. I also saw Aladdin, The Lion King and 101 Dalmatians, and I'm pretty sure I saw The Jungle Book, and I had a Jungle Book storybook too, and I saw at least sizeable chunks of The Lion King 2 and Mulan. But the rest of Disney, the big princess movies and stuff, I never saw, except for a clip here and there, till I was grown up and decided to watch them.

Except The Aristocats. I think it was the summer I was nine, but it may have been the summer I was ten, that my mother and I were house-sitting for a friend and, being an obsessive type, I became obsessed with The Aristocats and Toy Story, which the friends had on VHS (yes I'm that old), and watched them both over and over and over and over. Recently I re-watched The Aristocats, first in English and then in the Latin American Spanish dub, and found that it held up well. I was puzzled to find that it's generally considered lesser Disney. Yes the plot is basically a string of vignettes rather than a coherent story, and yes it borrows heavily from Lady and the Tramp and 101 Dalmatians, and yes there are some plotholes and Edgar the butler makes for a feeble villain -- but I thought it was good nonetheless, and I have high standards. I admit that nostalgia must be playing a big part in my assessment, but still!

Anyway, my point here is that The Aristocats is one of the least rampantly heteronormative Disney flicks. Sure, the whole thing is about Thomas and Duchess finding love and his becoming a stepfather to her kittens, and at the end we're told that Thomas and Duchess are also going to have kids of their own. But Duchess, when she meets Thomas, is a single mother. Not only has Thomas been around the block a few times -- we expect that -- but she's been around it at least once, because there are the kittens to prove it! Frufru the horse and Roquefort the mouse seem single, as does Edgar, though we don't really know for sure about any of them. Madame, the cats' human, is single, and so is her lawyer and old friend Georges. Both of them are getting on in years, but though they clearly have a soft spot for each other and some kind of history together, they don't end up married -- they don't seem to want to. They are happy as they are. Madame's significant others are her cats. Abigail and Amelia, the English geese whom the cats meet, have 'spinster' written all over them. They are sisters, and they are happily single together, keeping each other company. They also have their Uncle Waldo, who seems single, though again we don't know for sure, and he has them. Yeah, Uncle Waldo's probably an alcoholic, but still. Thomas has a group of lively jazz-playing bachelor friends who hang out together and he is particularly close to one of them, evidently his longtime best buddy. And when he gets together with Duchess, Thomas doesn't have to give up his old friends -- they turn up in the basement of Madame's mansion, since she has used her wealth to start a home for the alley cats of Paris.

Then there are Napoleon and Lafayette. They are two dogs, completely unrelated to the main plot and to each other, who live in the countryside and spend their time chasing passing vehicles, something which Napoleon sees as a serious military operation. They're both male, in case you didn't guess from the names, and Napoleon is Lafayette's military superior and is always snapping at him. But there's a remarkable scene in which Edgar, in an attempt to get his, Edgar's, bowler hat off the sleeping Napoleon's head, scratches Napoleon's back to get Napoleon to stretch out. Napoleon half wakes, enjoys the scratching, thinks Lafayette is doing it, gives Lafayette instructions. Lafayette, similarly half woken, also thinks he is doing the scratching. Napoleon has an orgasm from the scratching. I'm not making this up or reading too much into it. It's as plainly implied as anything of the sort I've ever seen. Then when Napoleon is fully awake and Lafayette is still half asleep, Lafayette is tipped into Napoleon's bed by Edgar, and Lafayette cuddles sleepily up to Napoleon, who irritatedly pushes him away. I swear to you all that those dogs have got something going on. It's as plain as the nose on your face. Deliberate homosexual innuendo in a Disney film.

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bump on a log
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On Sunday saw my first Jarman film: 'Caravaggio'. A good one if you like bisexual themes, hints of S&M or in-jokes about camp cardinals and Popes. Messes around with gender a bit too: the Cupid of Caravaggio's Amor Vincit Omnia is modelled by a woman.

I did suspect there was a bit of modern gay revisionism going on (so what else is new): Caravaggio is into a brawling tough who is rather far, physically and otherwise, from the male ideal of his day, an ideal which his art suggests he shared. But I don't know nearly enough about the subect to be sure.

Anyway, this is Jarman, the film's about Jarman, not about Caravaggio. You have to go in expecting that or you will be disappointed.

The visual tableaux I thought were stunning, but my visual sense is so bad that I can be deeply moved by the visual equivalent of bubblegum pop. I don't know what someone with an actual artist's eye would think of them.

At sixteen I would probably have been up in arms over the anachronisms Jarman throws in -- typewriter, trains, suits -- but I see now that these touches, when used right, are a way in, a window, a means of allowing us to empathise more fully with the past, that other country.

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eryn_smiles
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Has anyone watched "Cloudburst"? I really liked it.

--------------------
"Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation and that is an act of political warfare."

Audre Lorde

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Jacob at Scarleteen
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quote:
Originally posted by bump on a log:
On Sunday saw my first Jarman film: 'Caravaggio'. A good one if you like bisexual themes, hints of S&M or in-jokes about camp cardinals and Popes. Messes around with gender a bit too: the Cupid of Caravaggio's Amor Vincit Omnia is modelled by a woman.

I did suspect there was a bit of modern gay revisionism going on (so what else is new): Caravaggio is into a brawling tough who is rather far, physically and otherwise, from the male ideal of his day, an ideal which his art suggests he shared. But I don't know nearly enough about the subect to be sure.

Anyway, this is Jarman, the film's about Jarman, not about Caravaggio. You have to go in expecting that or you will be disappointed.

The visual tableaux I thought were stunning, but my visual sense is so bad that I can be deeply moved by the visual equivalent of bubblegum pop. I don't know what someone with an actual artist's eye would think of them.

At sixteen I would probably have been up in arms over the anachronisms Jarman throws in -- typewriter, trains, suits -- but I see now that these touches, when used right, are a way in, a window, a means of allowing us to empathise more fully with the past, that other country.

God I love Jarman so so so much...


quote:
Originally posted by eryn_smiles:
Has anyone watched "Cloudburst"? I really liked it.

Couldn't find a trailer but I watched a clip, looks awesome, I gotta see it!
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Claire P.
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So excited to add so many to my to-watch GLBTQ list!

My favorite film so far is Shortbus. It's by John Cameron Mitchell, the same guy who made Hedwig & the Angry Inch- which I saw somewhere earlier on this list.

Here's the trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8A1dwEhSMY

Posts: 170 | From: Northeast USA | Registered: Aug 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
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