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» Got Questions? Get Answers. » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sex Basics and Sexual Health » Spermacide, condoms, and risk, oh my

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Author Topic: Spermacide, condoms, and risk, oh my
Airem
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Ok This is a question of chances, and trust me i have already looked at the risk assesment flow chart thing but i have a curve ball.
My girlfriend and I had intecourse i used a trojan condom with spermicidal lube on it afterwards we decided to mess around i corrected myself down there (as i'm uncircumsized) then about 7 minutes later after i had wiped my hands on the carpet i fingered her. So what is my risk considering she had some spermicidal lube from the condom?

Posts: 157 | From: Athens, Texas, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
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You know, I'd worry more about your poor girlfriend and the possibility of vaginal bacterial infections right now. Carpets are total breeding ground for all sorts of gnarly germs. People's FEET and shoes are on them all day, and vacuuming doesn't really remove bacteria. Next time? Wash the hands instead, or keep latex gloves around. Don't wipe your hands in a bacterial breeding ground then put them on or in your partners genitals, eh? Yipes.

I'm not seeing a viable pregnancy risk here, for the record.


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Airem
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thank you for the quick replies in both forums, and your right on both fronts, ya see i got alot to unload tonight lol.
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Heather
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Well, consider this your warm -- albeit late -- welcome to the Wonderful, Wide World o'Germs, unfortunately.


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sparkleflower
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BV actually is caused by an imbalance of the bacteria normally found in the vagina - not from bacteria on carpets.

Think about it this way. For thousands and thousands and thousands of years, people have practiced what we would consider astonishingly poor hygiene. Rarely bathing, sitting in dirt, you name it. Yet, I'm guessing infections weren't any more common than they are now. I've never seen hygiene described as a risk factor for BV :-)


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Heather
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Well, you're mistaken in that, actually. Santiation is pretty much singlehandedly the very biggest aid to human health we know and yes, viral, bacterial and parasitic infections used to be much more deadly and more prevalant than they are now (though in some cases, modern technology has made bacetria and viruses even more resistent, so some are more deadly, even though we can manage and identify them better nowadays), on a per capita basis. But bear in mind that The Black Death, for instance -- no minor issue there -- was bacterial. The history of infectious diseases is actually pretty fascinating, if you're curious, and most public libraries have good resources on that.

It's still pretty murky as to what exactly 'causes" BV, according to all the reliable sources of public health information and research. But bacterial imbalances in the vagina generally occur because of an overall imbalance and/or because "unhealthy" or harmful bacteria, of various types, is introduced to the vagina, usually via hands, shared sex toys, etc. It's also thought the alkalinity of semen might upset the natural balance. Sometimes, our bodies can balance/rebalance after intoroduction to various other bacteria, other times, they cannot. But dirty hands in the vagina would absolutely be thought to increase the risk of various sorts of vaginitis.


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sparkleflower
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I totally agree - sanitation has been the biggest boon to the human race. I was simply referring to BV.

Yes, there isn't a lot known about BV. But what is known is that the bacteria present in BV are the bacteria that are normally present in the vagina anyway. Hygiene has never been listed as a risk factor for BV on any reputable site I've ever visited. I'm certainly not advocating for not bathing, or anything like that - I'm rather fastidious myself. I just wanted to point out that bacteria on the carpet isn't going to cause BV :-)


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Heather
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Well, here's some more info from reliable sources on BV and the issue of hygiene for you.

• http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec22/ch247/ch247a.html
• http://www.plannedparenthood.org/pp2/portal/files/portal/medicalinfo/femalesexualhealth/pub-lesbian-health.xml
• http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic3369.htm
• http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3700605.html
• http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/2086.html
• http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/DS/00255.html

I also have to tell you that I have NEVER met a single public health/infectious disease expert who will tell you that basic hygeine, especially handwashing, is not a huge factor in reducing the incidences of any type of bacterial spread or infection. My own mother has been one for several hospitals for many years now, and if I suggested that to her, she'd stare at me like I was from Mars. I expect our public health volunteers Janel or GumdropGirl would do same. There's a reason your GYN always gloves up, and that's not because they're at the biggest risk if they don't: their patients are.

(Just FYI? It is considered outmoded at this point to think that BV is just about normally occuring bacteria, like Gardnerella, becuase the longstanding question which remains is HOW those imbalances occur, and to boot, the overgrowth os other bacteria are more of what's being looked at these days. Also, consider that we often high rates of BV in lesbian women, wo often don't have what were considered the usual suspects for BV at play, but do have issues like shared sex toys and often more unprotected manual sex than opposite-sex partners, so these things have been suggested by various sources to be possible issues. There's good address of this in the most current edition of "Practical Gynecology." I promise I don't just pull this stuff outta my butt, really.


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sparkleflower
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Me neither. And none of the articles you posted contradict my point. All of them noted it was an overgrowth of bacteria normally present in the vagina.

As a side note, the emedicine article you posted didn't address BV at all.


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Karybu
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The overgrowth, though, is often caused by introduction of bacteria from outside the vagina which subtly change the pH or other factors. This isn't only the case with BV, there are loads of other infections caused this way in other parts of the body as well.

[This message has been edited by karybu (edited 01-06-2006).]


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Heather
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Vulvovaginitisincludes BV, and hygeine issues for all kinds of vaginitis apply to BV.

I'm going to be as clear as I possibly can about this, and then, you know, I'll pass any issue with this matter to another staffer or volunteer.

This is my job. It has been for years now. I take it pretty seriously, I consult with a giant bokcase and 'net resurce of sources incessantly, as well as other experts in the field. And absolutely, if any information here we're giving out is incorrect, we want to know.

But intellectual arguments about information belong in the staff stuff forum or in email to the site. We have to enter into dealing with them when they conflict with advise we've already given a user, so if another user flies through, spamming a metric arseload of threads, we've got to be on all those threads, which takes us AWAY from doing our actual job which is responding to users' questions.

Are you a medical student, a sexual health worker, a public health expert, a sex educator? if you are, and you want to help with the site, or are earnestly concerned about the accuracy or quality of the information here, we ask you manage it the same way you'd manage it at your job in any of those fields, the protocol for which should be obvious if you do work in any of them. In short, it's outside the context of the "room" a "patient" is in, because it only confuses and panics that person.


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