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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Pregnancy and Parenting » college and an enfant

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Author Topic: college and an enfant
ratatat
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Member # 42868

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So i guess I'm just curious is anyone knows about what I might do about college if I have a baby I'm seventeen and want to start college as soon as possible (I jsut graduated) do you know of any colleges that offer special programs for young mothers?? Please help me out this is going to make a huge difference in my decision on whether or not I'm going to keep it!
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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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Here's what I'd suggest:

I'd start by looking for the colleges that have what you want in terms of their locations and programs. Make a list of them.

THEN, what you'll want to do is call them up and ask what services they offer for single mothers. I'd include asking about any possible extra financial aid.

This also looks like a pretty good online resource: http://www.wilson.edu/wilson/asp/content2.asp?id=2874

Can I also ask what your timing would be? How far along are you in your pregnancy? Would your delivery be during college?

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Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
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Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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orca
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Hey ratatat. While I do not know of any special programs colleges have to specifically help mothers, I do know that many colleges offer degree programs and/or classes at times that would be easier for people who have other stuff they need to do during the day, like work or family care. I also know a few young mothers at my college who are doing a traditional course-load, and it's a college with a reputation for being difficult, but the young mothers I know tend to make Dean's List regularly, so it's quite possible to have a baby and still be a traditional student (which just means degree-seeking, attending at least 12 credit hours per semester, though that number may vary at each school). Are there specific schools that you are looking at? If so, calling up their admissions' office would be a good start to getting that info.

Do you know yet if you are going to co-parent or who and what kind of support you will have with childcare? Often that can make a difference, too.

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Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.--Monty Python and the Holy Grail

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ratatat
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Member # 42868

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To answer both of your questions. I would have the baby in January and I'm not sure at this point if I would just take the year off or start school right away or what. And as far as parenting goes, it would just be me and my parents might be willing to help but I have a 3 year old brother and a 5 uear old brother so their hands are kind of full. And thanks for that website it was really helpful =)
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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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I'd just figure that around delivery -- maybe a window of a month before and a few months after -- is going to be the time when it's possible you won't be up to much of anything.

Too, if you're seriously considering this, are you planning to soon tell your parents and ask them about helping you out? It's helpful to know what help and support you will or will not have when making these choices.

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Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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KittenGoddess
Scarleteen Volunteer
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You may want to ask not only about special programs for single (or young) parents, but rather about specific services that might be available. Often, schools don't have programs for that but do have things available that would help. So if you ask about it and get a response of "no", that might not actually mean no...it may just mean that you have to find resources on your own because they're not centralized.

So...I'd ask about the following things as well:
1) Is there on-campus daycare available for students? How much does it cost? What is the procedure to get in? How long is the waiting list?

2) What would my financial aid status be and what resources would be available to me? (You want to ask the financial aid people, but I believe that once you have a child, you no longer are required to report your parent's income on your FASFA. Once you have a dependent, you generally qualify as an "independent student" and only file your own financial information...meaning that your aid package will be based on your income, not on any contributions from your family.) If a child would change things, then ask about whether you can re-file for your aid once you've delivered so that it will change immediately.

3) What resources are available for "non-traditional students"? (Using this language may net your further information. As a student/parent, you classify as a "non-trad".)

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Sarah Liz

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