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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Bodies » Dizziness before and during your period?

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Author Topic: Dizziness before and during your period?
Kadkitty
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The last few days I get dizzy if I stand up, and I was not sure why. I figured I stand up too fast, so I try to stand up slower. I also figured it might be my thyroid. I was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism (Hashimotos disease) a few months ago and put on levothyroxin. After a month my levels were rechecked and while the doctor said my TSH was normal I still had symptoms and she upped my dose...so I figured that the dizziness could have been caused by my thyroid become hyperactive. Next week I am having my routine blood tests to check my levels and I was going to mention the dizziness.
But today I got my period. I am still a little dizzy. Could it be due to my period?
Also, I know I am anemic but they can't do anything for that since I am not allowed to take iron supplements...food iron is ok but not supplements.

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orca
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Hey Kadkitty. I have Hashimoto's, too, and had problems with anemia in the (recent) past. A few questions: 1. Is the doctor you are seeing about your thyroid an endocrinologist? 2. Have you discussed all of this with your gynecologist? 3. Are you seeing a dietician for help with the anemia?

You can take iron supplements while on levothyroxin, BUT you have to take the iron supplements 12 hours apart from the levothyroxin. Even then, it's likely that the levothyroxin won't be absorbed by your system as well as it would be otherwise (though that may just mean the doctor will have to increase the dose on your levothyroxin), but it is just as important to treat the anemia as it is to treat the thyroid problems since both can be serious. Of course, I don't know your medical history so that's something to talk to your doctor about to make sure it is safe for you.

Hypothyroidism can cause menorrhagia (aka abnormally heavy and prolonged menstrual bleeding), which could be contributing to the anemia, so you should notice some difference soon, unless there's an underlying condition (all the more reason to get checked out by a gynecologist). However, that likely won't help with the existing anemia but may help prevent future occurences. The existing anemia still needs to be treated.

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Kadkitty
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1. I don't have an endocrinologist, my doctor is just my family doctor/general doctor
2. I don't have one of those either
3. Nope I don't have one of those either...

My dad and I have a blood disorder and for some reason iron is not good for us...so that is why I am not allowed to have the iron. So the anemia cannot be treated, that I know of...
I think I had the menorrhagia before. My periods have always been heavier and I just connected the dots when I found out I have hypothyroid. Since taking the medicine they are more comfortable though.

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orca
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I would really recommend seeing an endocrinologist if you can afford it. A general doctor just doesn't have the same depth of knowledge and isn't as likely to keep up with the latest research and treatments for thyroid problems (the most common reason people see endocrinologists) as an endocrinologist. That's not to diss general doctors; it's just that a general doctor is usually going to see a bunch of different patients with very different problems in a day, so their knowledge on each problem is going to be less than that of a doctor who specializes in one particular area.

Seeing an endocrinologist means getting the best possible care for your thyroid problems, and with Hashimoto's, where the levels can be in flux a lot, it's especially important to make sure you are receiving the correct dose. If you have health insurance, then you can ask your provider what endocrinologists are covered by your insurance. If you don't have health insurance, then you may want to ask your GP if there are any endocrinologists in the area that accept sliding scale fees.

Also, I see from one of your posts from last year that you'd never seen a gynecologist before. If that's still the case, I would recommend doing so now. They could suggest alternative treatments to deal with the anemia (though it's likely that dietary change will be your best bet if you are unable to take the supplements), and also look to see if there are any underlying causes to the menstrual problems.

Often you can find low-cost women's health clinics, which your GP may be able to direct you to, or you can see if your local Planned Parenthood (which works on a sliding scale fee) does gynecological exams and can help you investigate the problem. You can find that out by giving them a quick call and explaining the situation, and if they don't provide those services, you could ask them for suggestions on other low-cost places in your area.

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Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.--Monty Python and the Holy Grail

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Kadkitty
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Thanks.
I really wanted an endocrinologist but the general doctor did not offer a suggestion for one...she just treated me?
Nope I never seen a gynecologist and I don't want to [Frown]
Though I am not sure if one is even in my area (same with the endo)
I've just lived with the anemia. My dad won't eat anything high in iron (such as Total cereals that give you the 100% of daily iron value)
I accidently got the Fiber one shredded wheat and realized it had 90% of your daily iron in it. I ate it but did not buy it again. I even told my doctor that my iron would probably be high as a result, but she said nope...

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orca
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If you want to let us know your general location, we could help you find someone in your area. Or, you can call up your doctor and ask. Sometimes doctors won't give referrals unless you ask them, so that may just be something you have to be proactive about. If there is not someone in your immediate area, would you be able to travel say an hour or two to get to a specialist?

Is there a particular reason you don't want to see a gynecologist? By your age, women should really be seeing a gynecologist once a year for an exam. Did you have a bad experience in the past? Or are you just uncertain of what will happen during an appointment?

As for the iron, here again I'm going to recommend seeing a specialist to talk this over with. Not knowing the blood disorder, your medical history, or your family's medical history, I don't know what options would be best for you in treating the anemia. I do know, though, that untreated anemia can become serious and affect cognitive abilities, as well as just leave you feeling crappy and run-down all the time. It's also unsafe to self-diagnose or treat iron anemia without consulting a doctor because it's possible to overdose on iron.

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Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.--Monty Python and the Holy Grail

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Kadkitty
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I never asked her for a specialist, I thought that might be rude...but my mom has the hyper type of thyroid problem and she doesn't have an endo either.
I read lots of stuff on this site, so I understand why going to a gyno is important and the procedure. I have never really been to one. I'm just very self conscious about my body so I really don't want to go...and right now I don't want children but if someday I wanted children I figured I would go to one. Also my mom never went to one regularly either so...
No, I am not self diagnosing with my iron problem. I have been tested for iron problems since I was in 2nd grade, had anemia so they gave me iron supplements.
But then they checked me for the thing my dad has and then told us we can't have iron and do not take supplements, ever. I don't know what it is or how to explain it, but it is in my file to never prescribe iron pills to me...

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atm1
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Given that you have two very specific conditions, it probably would be best for you to see a specialist. It's definitely not rude to ask a doctor for a referral to a specialist. They should be totally used to that sort of thing, and it's part of their job to find you the best care available.

One more thing: What our parents do is not always what we should be doing in terms of our own health. While it's good to get their advice, often we need to do some things to take care of ourselves that our parents just wouldn't think to do.

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cool87
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Kadkitty, the first thing that's probably the easiest to rule out as a possible cause of your dizziness is dehydratation. Do you always make sure you're drinking plenty of water ? When does your dizziness occurs ?

Too, anemia can definatly cause you to feel dizzy, I know it cause I've personnally experienced it.

And BTW, most family doctors at least here know how to deal with most cases of uncomplicated dysthyroidism and how to treat it, they generally have a lot of patients who deal with this medical condition, that's something common and it's generally not very difficult to treat albeit a few more complicated cases. Of course an endocrinologist might be best in terms of knowledge but if it works the same where you live as here, they're generally very loaded and won't likely handle a thyroid problem when it's not complicated and something that could easily be handled by the patient's family doctor. They'll intervene more likely in more complicated cases the family doctor don't feel comfortable handling.

[ 07-03-2009, 10:30 PM: Message edited by: cool87 ]

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Kadkitty
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My dizziness occurs when I stand up. Typically in the morning, such as getting out of bed. It doesn't happen everytime I stand up, and maybe happens only 2 times every other day.
I am very hydrated. I drink water all day long, plus I drink milk and eat fruits and veggies...so even if I forget to refill my water bottle I get water from my meals too.

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Kadkitty
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I have 'beta Thalassemia'
That is why I am not allowed to have iron...but I have the beta minor which is not as bad as the major, according to my dad.

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Heather
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Ultimately, Kadkitty, the kind of health questions you are primarily asking about are simply out of our scope here at Scarleteen.

So, again, I'd follow the suggestion of either talking in more depth to your primary care physician, or asking that physician to be referred to a specialist.

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