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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Bodies » coffee and vitamins

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Author Topic: coffee and vitamins
pretzle
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Two quick questions:

1)Is it true that coffee increases metabolism?

2)Does taking supplements of vitamin A and D have any side effects- apart from making bones stronger?

Thanks for you help

[This message has been edited by pretzle (edited 02-22-2005).]


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Barbarosa
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What do you mean by "raises your metabolism"?

And how much Vit A and D are we talking about?


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JamsessionVT
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After doing some medical book skimming, I found a Danish study that concludes that "in a study of normal weight volunteers, a single cup of coffee has been found to raise the metabolic rate about 3%-5%" (Interesting, if this is true, I never knew that)

If you mean side-affects in the negative sense, then no, there should be none. However, vitamin D, for most people, is recieved from sunlight, and vitamin A is usually found in foods that contain carotene (which is converted into vitamin A once in the body) or retinol, found in animal tissue.

Vitamin A is also used to keep skin, eyes, and general vision health, and supports red cell health, promotes wound healing, and resists infection. Vitamin D is manufactured in the skin with sun exposure, and it helps to maintain blood-calcium levels, and regulates intestinal absorbtion of calcium and phosphorus.

(Cite: all info from UVM Medical Encyclopedia, Year 2)


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Gumdrop Girl
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coffee doesn't raise your metabolism for long enough for it to help you burn fat or calories. besides, with the amount of cream and sugar that a lot of young people put into coffee, you're probably doing more harm than good. And because coffee has diuretic effects (makes you pee a lot), you actually wind up flushing a lot of good vitamins out of your system if you try to take the two together. in particular, expect to give up some Vitamin B and C since those are water-soluble.

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Barbarosa
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Nicely done! I was waiting to get a little more info, but you both did a lovely job. I would like to share a little added info;
  • caffeine in studies appears to exert a modest breif increase in basal metabolic rate (BMR)
  • the dose needed to see a difference is not insignificant (anywhere from 4 to 10 mg per kg body weight)
  • large doses of caffeine can result in serious side effects and toxicities
  • the change in BMR may be related to the effect caffeine has on the nervous system and certain hormones
  • this change may rapidly decline with consistent use – meaning the more often caffeine is used the less the amount of effect on BMR, the same problems have been seen with other “metabolism stimulators”
  • caffeine is not safe for every one to use, certain health conditions can make its use rather hazardous

With respect to the vitamins I would add the following;

  • taken in excess amounts both these vitamins can have serious unintended consequences
  • cyanide is perfectly natural and can be found in several plant sources, but is quite lethal
  • any substance no matter how natural can be lethal if taken in excessive amounts
  • vitamins A and D are fat soluble, which means they have some unique features relative to some of the other vitamins, one of which is that excess amounts cannot easily be eliminated from the body
  • it does not take a lot of sunlight to generate the amount of vitamin D needed each day for optimal calcium metabolism and bone health, and not a lot of skin needs to be exposed
  • excessive amounts of vitamin D and A can have serious toxicities associated with their use, especially if together as they can have additive properties
  • these problems include abnormalities in skin, bone health, and calcium metabolism
  • excessive vitamin A can actually weaken bone

As an interesting if not boring side note, caffeine was documented as a treatment for asthma as early as 1859, vitamin A was one of the first fat soluble vitamins discovered in the early 1900s, and ½ credit goes to researchers right here in chilly Wisconsin! (partial credit to the other guys at Yale…)

What is the moral of the story? Moderation in all things, eat right and exercise, preferably in a place you can get some sun.

[This message has been edited by Barbarosa (edited 02-22-2005).]

[This message has been edited by Barbarosa (edited 02-22-2005).]

[This message has been edited by Barbarosa (edited 02-22-2005).]


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MarvellousPurple
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Just how much vitamin A or D is too much? I know bottles of carrot juice have some ridiculous amount of vitamin A, for example, but I've never seena anyone keel over from drinking one.

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Gumdrop Girl
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well, about 450mL of carrot juice has 700% recommended daily allowance of vit A. I know this because i love carrot juice and had a bottle a few days ago. i'd drink more if it were cheaper on campus. if 700% is killing my bones, then i'd be awfully surprised.

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pretzle
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so if i want to keep my bones healthy (to reduce the risk of osteoporosis) is it best to take calcium supplements instead of vitamins?
i don't eat/drink many dairy products- so is there anything else with high levels of calcium in?

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Gumdrop Girl
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i'm on the opinion that everyone can benefit from taking a one-a-day multivitamin with breakfast.

i'm also totally in favor of everyone getting enough calcium in their diet whether by food or supplements. here's my list of tips for getting enough calcium http://www.scarleteen.com/forum/Forum24/HTML/000826.html

Teens need to get about 1500mg of calcium every day. The recommended amount for adults under 50 is about 1200mg.

I take both calcium supplements and a multivitamin. I check the label to make sure I follow the dose correctly. Do you know how to read a nutrition label? If not, let us know and we can walk you through the jargon.

Also, with ANY nutrient, getting too much is not good. Too much sugar makes you fat. Too much vit A does that litany of things you saw listed. too much calcium can cause kidney stones. So it's important to know how to read the supplement labels to find that dose appropriate for you.

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LA County STD Hotline 1.800.758.0880
Toll free STD and clinic information, and condoms sent to your door for Los Angeles County residents.
1 in 3 sexually active people will be exposed to a STD by the time they turn 24.


Posts: 12677 | From: Los Angeles, CA ... somewhere off the 10 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Barbarosa
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Sorry for the delay in getting back to this, I did not want to leave the whole Vitamin A bone thing hanging.

There are two basic types of vitamin A you can ingest, “preformed” and carotenoids, or compounds that the body makes into Vitamin A. Preformed is the kind of Vitamin A found (apologies to Vegan’s everywhere) in animal liver and most vitamin supplements. Carotenoids like beta carotene among others, are most commonly the source that comes from plants, but can also be found in supplements. Beta carotene from food sources does not translate in a 1:1 way into retinol (Vitamin A), and most RDA amounts are listed as Vitamin A equivalents.

The RDA for Vitamin A in adult females is 700 micrograms per day, 800 in adult males. In general, the amount of preformed Vitamin A that is the maximal upper limit not likely to cause adverse health outcomes is 2800 to 3000 micrograms per day for the age ranges of likely users of this sites. For nutritional supplements, preformed Vitamin A and Beta carotene (as well as other precursors) are counted on a 1 to 1 basis.

There are 2 types of Vitamin A toxicity, acute and chronic. For acute poisoning, very large doses of Vitamin A taken over a concentrated period of time lead to symptoms fairly abruptly. In the chronic form the dose can be much closer to the Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA).

If you have access there was a great article in The New England Journal of Medicine, January 23 2003 issue by Dr Paul Lips examining studies linking small excess amounts of Vitamin A to the risk of bone fracture. (www.nejm.org)

When you think about taking a supplement consider this, manufactures of nutritional supplements are no less immune from the effects of greed, and no more interested in our health as a whole than the manufacturers of pharmaceuticals. They are however completely unregulated. Virtually every study looking at the purported health benefits of supplements has demonstrated getting critical micronutrients from the parent food, usually grains, fruits and veggies (nods of respect to Vegans anywhere) is better than trying to make up for dietary deficiencies by taking a pill.

Now for the closing interesting (perhaps to me only) tidbit; the first recorded cases of likely Vitamin A poisoning was in 1597. An expedition recorded becoming gravely ill after eating polar bear liver, all recovered but classical symptoms of acute Vitamin A toxicity were recorded in the expedition diary.

Well, it looks like I have used another several weeks worth of bandwidth again…


Posts: 380 | From: Up North, Wisconsin | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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