Donate Now
We've Moved! Check out our new boards.
  New Poll  
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Bodies » good sources of protein/Iron

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: good sources of protein/Iron
Faeryprinces
Activist
Member # 12405

Icon 5 posted      Profile for Faeryprinces     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I dont label myself a vegetarian, but if you looked at what i ate everyday you'd think i was. Meat isnt exactly my favorite thing to eat, I'll eat it if i have to but if i have the option not to, i wont eat meat. So being away at college, there arent many options...Since I am borderline iron deficient anemic, my doctor has me taking flinstones vitamins with iron. But I was wondering, being at school what can i eat that will supplement my lack of protein? My mother tells me to eat "chic peas" on my salad and that they are a good source of protein...but I'm just trying to find more options. If anyone has anymore info, I'd appreciate it. Thanks so much!
Posts: 227 | From: New Jersey, USA | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
emsily0
Activist
Member # 2059

Icon 1 posted      Profile for emsily0     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
well...i have the same problem as you, i'm at school and the meat here just isn't my thing.

i eat a lot of eggs. i try to get to breakfast every day. also, putting a hard boiled egg on your salad is a good idea.

also, peanut butter. it's everywhere. try a PB&J sometimes, or peanut butter on apples or bananas for dessert. if you add honey, it's yum

i have to agree with your mom! any legumes (like beans and chick peas) are really excellent sources of protein. try hummus or white bean salad. or just toss them in your salad and dress it with lemon juice and olive oil. yum

em


Posts: 786 | From: Washington, DC | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
RumpusParable
Activist
Member # 2295

Icon 1 posted      Profile for RumpusParable     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
rices (brown/wild) and other grains
many veggies in small amounts
legumes are loaded
nuts & seeds are loaded
soy of all types

to get all your essential amino acids, be sure to mix it up some within a day or between two days in a row or such.. just eat in variety...

here's a link to the nutritional data site. in the tools section, it lets you search for specific info. this just leads to a search i did in "vegetables & vegetable products" for protein:
http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-011078000000000000000.html


Posts: 160 | Registered: Jan 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
logic_grrl
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 8067

Icon 1 posted      Profile for logic_grrl     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Good non-meat sources of protein: beans and other legumes (chick peas included ), tofu, tempeh and other soy products, nuts, rice and other grains, eggs, dairy products ...

(And fish and seafood, if it's just animal meat that you prefer not to eat).

As a practical point, many vegetable sources of protein don't provide "complete" proteins so it's a good idea to ensure that you get a good mix (e.g. by eating red beans with rice, hummus on wholegrain bread, etc.).

Good non-meat sources of iron: spinach, broccoli, kale (any dark green leafy vegetables, basically) kidney beans, wholewheat bread, raisins, sunflower seeds, molasses, apricots (and that's just the start of the list ).


Posts: 6944 | From: UK | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Faeryprinces
Activist
Member # 12405

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Faeryprinces     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thankyou everyone who responded!! Some of the things you guys mentioned, i would love to eat, but however are also kind of difficult to find in a college cafeteria(like soy products, spinach, tofu, rices, and such...) They do have eggs, and a limited variety of legumes/beans, and such. I so *wish* they had some type of seafood here in the cafe that i trusted eating, because i totally would!! For now, my mom just bought me packages of the starkist white tuna in the little bag, of which i like to eat by itself with nothing on it most of the time. Peanut butter and apples have become my staple food it seems... I never realized molasses could be a good source of iron...no wonder my aunt(who also doesnt like meat all that much) has made a stead diet of eating whole grains in the morning mixed with molasses. It makes a lot of sense now.

thanks everyone again, your comments are very much appreciated


Posts: 227 | From: New Jersey, USA | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
logic_grrl
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 8067

Icon 1 posted      Profile for logic_grrl     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Are there any cooking facilities you can use? I know some colleges have hotplates or microwaves that students can use.

Even without that, it's still possible to supplement the college food pretty easily, if you'd like to try a wider range of foods.

For example, many health food shops sell packet miso soup (which is soy-based). You just put it in a mug and pour boiling water on it, like making instant coffee. So if you have a kettle in your room, you could try that. Or you could buy nuts and seeds and dried fruit to snack on.


Posts: 6944 | From: UK | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Faeryprinces
Activist
Member # 12405

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Faeryprinces     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
No there arent really any cooking facilities to use besides my microwave in my room... I'll have to look for the miso soup. Because i definately have a little coffee maker in my room(just to boil water, i dont drink coffee ). So if I could find that thatd be cool. I am however a huge fan of dried fuits and such...trail mix is my friend, i like trail mix...Though, I havent had it in awhile. So when i go home for thanksgiving break, i'm definately going shopping for some food!

Thanks so much!!


Posts: 227 | From: New Jersey, USA | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
logic_grrl
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 8067

Icon 1 posted      Profile for logic_grrl     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hey, microwaves are great for steaming vegetables!

Seriously, with a kettle and a microwave, there are a huge range of simple and healthy snacks and meals you can make in your room, that'll fill in any nutritional gaps left by eating in the cafeteria the rest of the time .

[This message has been edited by logic_grrl (edited 11-25-2003).]


Posts: 6944 | From: UK | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
foreverlovin
Activist
Member # 15319

Icon 1 posted      Profile for foreverlovin     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
i totally understand you because i dont really eat meat either and i get know iron and i don't know what to do because i am going to get really sick soon. I eat plain pasta for dinner and a bagel for lunch every single day. the only time i get iron is when i eat chicken fingers and that is only once a week if im lucky. im really worried im going to get sick.. i have no energy or anything but i don't like anything else. are the pills good to give u iron? i'll eat penut butter and fruit but thats all.. if anyone knows please write back. jess
Posts: 52 | From: boca raton, fl, us | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Not eating meat does NOT mean you get no iron. In fact, many vegetable sources offer more iron than meat does.

And yes, you need to learn to eat fruits and vegetables and legumes if you're going to have energy and stay well.

Great non-animal sources of iron are, (and some are posted right above, kids): citrus fruits or juices, broccoli, tomatoes, green pepper, red and white beans, chick peas, dark green vegetables like spinach and other greens, dried fruits, prune juice, molasses, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, soy beans and soy products (tofu, tempeh, soy milks and cheeses), iron-fortified cereals and breads, etc.

Just an FYI, most folks in the western world do NOT have to worry about being malnourished. It's a slight cultural paranoia on our part. People who eat nothing but junk, processed foods, and meat, bread and cheese night and day should have health concerns and will liely run into problems. But most folks with average diets are not going to have major nutritional deficiences: westerners in general are just too well fed for that to be a major concern.

And if your energy is feeling low, just look to eat more soundly, which for most young peole in the west, means NOT making their diet primarily or even mostly simple carbs, meats and dairy. Those things should come AFTER a majority of fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and complex carbohydrates.

------------------
Heather Corinna
Editor and Founder, Scarleteen

My epitaph should read: "She worked herself into this ground."
-- Kay Bailey Hutchinson


Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

  New Poll   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3