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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Bodies » Hypothyroidism

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Author Topic: Hypothyroidism
Milke
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My partner suffers from rather severe hypothyroidism, and through irresponsible or absent doctors, is currently being undermedicated for it. We're trying to find a permanent doctor, and ways for him to arrange time off work to see them, but I really think there's got to be more to helping his health than just a prescription.
Laughs Wisely mentioned a link between hypothyroidism and depression, which I'd not previously been aware of, and I'm grateful for that, but it's also made me very aware that we need to do something and soon. My partner's health and emotional state have been declining and I'm getting a bit frightened. I'm currently looking into information on nutrition and yoga, and trying to find an endocrinologist in our city, but I was very curious if anyone here had had any experience with thyroid disorders, and/or using diet and complimentary medicine to help treat such problems. I'd be grateful for any help you could give me.

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Heather
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Hey Milke. I can help some. In terms of supplements, the following are helpful:

Kelp/Iodine
Selenium
Zinc (many folks with hypothyroid also have zinc deficiencies)
Vitamin C

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Heather Corinna
Editor and Founder, Scarleteen

My epitaph should read: "She worked herself into this ground."
-- Kay Bailey Hutchinson


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Milke
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We have kelp, and it seems to be some help, but I'll look for the other three next time I'm out.

Thank you!


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Gumdrop Girl
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Just wanted to throw out a few symptoms of hypothyroidism

constant feeling of chills
difficulty in concentrating or thinking
loss of appetite

in general, thyroid hormones control your metabolism. not having enough thyroid hormone (T3/T4 are the two forms) will slow your metabolism drastically.

Some causes of hypothyroidism are thyroid gland damage due to cancerous or non-cancerous tumors, problems with thyroid hormone receptors and iodine deficiency.

About thyroid hormone itself. It's made from the amino acid Tyrosine. Two Tyrosine molecules condense. Then either 3 or 4 iodide ions bind to the complex forming T3 or T4. Even though they are not steroidal, they work similarly to steroid hormones. This means their effects are slow-acting and long lasting.

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straddle the fine line between profundity and profanity...


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Heather
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Question, from the curious, Gumdrop: I know when hypothyroidism came up as a possibility for me (and still, it is lurking, but nutritional remedies seem to work fine for me) it was said that thyroid hormone would be the best treatment.

However, since it was bovine (cow) hormone that is used, to my understanding, that isn't something I would have been willing to take, as may be the case with most vegetarians.

Know what docs would normally suggest in that instance currently?

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Heather Corinna
Editor and Founder, Scarleteen

My epitaph should read: "She worked herself into this ground."
-- Kay Bailey Hutchinson


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Janeth
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Here are some things i found on the internet:

Only subtle symptoms may occur early in the course of hypothyroidism. These may include: fatigue decreased concentration intolerance to cold environments constipation loss of appetite muscle cramping and stiffness weight gain

Some individuals may notice hair loss, dry skin, or nail changes. If left untreated, the symptoms of hypothyroidism will progress. This can lead to fluid retention around the eyes or legs.

Untreated hypothyroidism can also cause congestive heart failure, a condition in which a weakened heart is unable to pump enough blood to body organs. In severe cases, the brain itself is affected. The person can lose mental function and even go into a coma.


The long-term effects of untreated hypothyroidism can be profound. Severe, prolonged hypothyroidism can lead to multiple abnormalities within any system of the body including heart, brain, and skin. Untreated hypothyroidism can cause heart disease, osteoporosis or thinning of the bones, and infertility in women. If left untreated for many years, severe hypothyroidism can eventually lead to death.

Fatigue
Weakness
Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight
Coarse, dry hair
Dry, rough pale skin
Hair loss
Cold intolerance (can't tolerate the cold like those around you)
Muscle cramps and frequent muscle aches
Constipation
Depression
Irritability
Memory loss
Abnormal menstrual cycles
Decreased libido


I haven't found anything information saying that it is past on from generation. Does anyone know if it does, and if so does it go from one to another or does it skip a generation?


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Tel'kella
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quote:
Originally posted by Janeth:
I haven't found anything information saying that it is past on from generation. Does anyone know if it does, and if so does it go from one to another or does it skip a generation?

Thyroid diseases (both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism) can be passed on genetically. I've had three doctors suspect I have thyroid disease because my mother has it and I have a few symptoms, but for me, that doesn't seem to be the case. As to whether it can skip a generation, I don't know.


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Janeth
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Thanks alot for the reply. I wonder if i will get it because there are people in my family who have it. When does one usually get hypo or hyper? (what age). At least i know that it can be treated!
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Tel'kella
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I don't know if there's a particular age for it (gah, there's so much I don't know), but the first time I was tested for it, I was ::thinks:: about twelve or thirteen. So assuming my GP is knowledgeable, you can have it at least as early as that.

The best thing to do if you're concerned is to get tested. It's very easy, just a little blood test! Since you're at increased risk, it's possible that your doctor will want you to be retested periodically if your first test comes out negative (that's what they've been doing with me), but whether you'd have to be retested and how often depends on a variety of factors; ask your doctor. And yup, it's very treatable.


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Pumpkin_Pie
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I hope people don't me posting about this in this thread, but I've jsut been diagnosed with hyperthyroidism, and doctor has organised a scan to find out whether its caused by the auto-immune disorder Grave's Disease, or by Thyroiditis(Inflammataion of the Thyroid Gland).

I'm just wondering, the doc said that if it is Grave's Disease, the treatment would be tablets for about 18 months.

Does anyone(and I suppose by anyone, I mean our wonderfully medical knowledge endowed gummy) know the treatment for thyroiditis, and what the tablets that I would be receiving for Grave's would be? Or their side effects?


Thanks, and uh, anyone else suffer from this?

I find it a nightmare. I'm buzzing in school and then I collapse into bed when I get home.

I'm on tablets to slow down my heart rate.I'm shaking, I'm sweating like a pig and I'm so grumpy I offend myself!

Could a messed up Thyroid gland have anything to do with excessive dieting about a year and a half ago? No one in my family actually suffers from it, or has any problems with their thyroid.


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Heather
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To my understanding, Slayer, excessive dieting more often causes problems with underactive, rather than overactive, thyroid. But someone like Gumdrop Girl likely has more information on that in her noggin.

Here is a list of some common medications for treating hyperthyroidism or Graves: http://www.mythyroid.com/medications_for_hyperthyroidism.htm

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Heather Corinna
Editor and Founder, Scarleteen

My epitaph should read: "She worked herself into this ground."
-- Kay Bailey Hutchinson


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Gumdrop Girl
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Had to consult the books for this one. i love the tough and interesting questions

for Graves disease, the treatment qould be to block the immune proteins that are screwing with your thyroid, so chances are, you will be put on immune-suppresants. The side-effects are increased suceptibility to infection (you'll be getting more colds, but at least you won't get a goiter -- golly, you oughtta see some of these pictues in my textbook).

Thyroiditis is likely to be treated like a lot of other inflammations. you may be given steroids to suppress the inflammation. Side effects include immune-suppression and puffiness (moon-face).

I'll try to get more info for you in a day or so (i'm taking a trip today, be back tomorrow nightish)

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According to the experts, I am some species of badass.


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Daydreamer24
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One of my best friends has hypothyroidism. She found out after being tired and restless all of the time.
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Pumpkin_Pie
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Thanks Gummy and Miz S!


I'm actually have the beginning of a goitre, and I've seen pictures in biology when we were studying homeostasis, and eh, not a pretty sight....


I am getting an isotope(radionuclide) scan on Friday, so hopefully that will reveal all...


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Pumpkin_Pie
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Well, all was revealed and I have Grave's disease, which I find surprising, because I don't have the bulgy eyes thing.


The doctor has given me a prescription, and I'm on tablets now for at least 7 weeks, adn I have to get a blood test.


It could be worse, tumours and cancers have been ruled(a huge fear I had) and this is treatable so, while its causing me some discomfort, it by no means is the worse possible scenario.


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Gumdrop Girl
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glad you got a diagnosis and treatment. hope things go well for you, slayer

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According to the experts, I am some species of badass.


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Gumdrop Girl
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quote:
Originally posted by Miz Scarlet:
Question, from the curious, Gumdrop: I know when hypothyroidism came up as a possibility for me (and still, it is lurking, but nutritional remedies seem to work fine for me) it was said that thyroid hormone would be the best treatment.


However, since it was bovine (cow) hormone that is used, to my understanding, that isn't something I would have been willing to take, as may be the case with most vegetarians.


Know what docs would normally suggest in that instance currently?


A-ha! There is a synthetic non-animal based thyroid medication called Synthroid. It is meant for people who cannot take porcine or bovine-based thyroxine (whether for religious, ethical or allergy reasons).

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more surly than girly...


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Insane
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Recent studies have actually suggest that what doctors consider to be a normal TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) level is too high. People who are testing normal (in the 3-5 uU/mL) area can actually have hypothyroditism. Other studies have suggested that anything greater than 2 is a sign of a hypothyroid. The current range is something like 0.5-5.5. Anything above that is considered hypothyroid. The higher TSH you have the more your body is trying to make thyroid. Most doctors just test your TSH, but your T3 and T4 levels give a more acurate picture of a thyroid problem.
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