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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Bodies » nesessary

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Author Topic: nesessary
FuNnY
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At the moment at the schools all the girls are getting cervical cancer needles which are supposed to help against cervical cancer, they get 3 all together over a period of time. I wasnt there when we were supposed to bring our notes in so i am not getting them at school, but ive been told i can get them from the local doctor for free.

I just want to know if people think this needle is nesessary? and should i get it. i hace no problem wit getting the needle but will therebe consequences if i dont get it?

There has been bowl cancer and breast cancer in my family, does this make me more at risk?
,Cheers

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Leabug
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Check out this article- it explains everything about the HPV vaccine pretty well: The HPV Vaccine FAQ

Whether or not to get it is up to you. If you do a search on our boards, you'll see lots of threads on the topic of whether or not it's necessary, and they illustrate well that it's really your choice.

For more info on HPV:
The STI Files: Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
HPV & Herpes: Why Safer Sex Isn't Always Safe Enough

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Lea

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Beckylein
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Personally? I think the shot is a good idea-- **IF**--and only if a person is at risk for HPV (but I believe in leaving my body alone if it doesn't need what I'm taking, though I'm ALL for modern medicine and other vaccinations-just not this one). My doctor tried to shove the shot down my throat (and went so far as harassing my mom about me not getting it-even though I was out of my mom's jurisdiction). I told her no, since I had done my own research on the shot and decided it wasn't for me. She told me to look into it further and to hurry up, so that I could get the shot before I was infected (WTF?! ugh...). Sure, I'd imagine it could be helpful if a person had multiple partners and wasn't practicing safe sex, but for me? I'd rather just stick to my very serious, monogamous relationship (where both of us came into it as each others' firsts and have been screened multiple times for STIs) practice safer sex, and have paps once a year. I think people should consider it a bit more before they just go injecting people in a frenzy of fear, but that's just me...(I *really* don't like the idea of giving 9 year-olds the shot, though). The other thing I don't like about the shot is how new it is (as far as I know). They don't know what's going to happen 30 years down the line, or 20 as far as side effects go. Just my thoughts on the matter [Smile] Out of curiosity, though, what are the laws on vaccinating a minor (parents vaccinating) against their will?

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"Dance like nobody's watching; love like you've never been hurt; sing like nobody's listening; live like it's heaven on earth." ~Mark Twain

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LilBlueSmurf
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I really wish it were that simple, Beckylein.

A few things to think about though. First, condoms are not as effective against HPV as they are other STIs. This is because HPV can occur on areas not covered by a condom. Second, there is no test for men for HPV. Your male partner can have HPV, no warts, have only had one or few past partners, be monogomous w/ you, and still have HPV. It's just not as easy as you're making it out to be. I understand and respect that your decision is to not get the vaccine, but i worry that you're not fully educated on this and that you may be misleading others.

As with other vaccines, parents make decisions for their children until they are medically competent to make decisions about their own care (whether or not to get the vaccine).

Check it out;

http://www.cdc.gov/std/HPV/STDFact-HPV.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/STDFact-HPV-and-men.htm

[ 07-31-2007, 09:34 PM: Message edited by: LilBlueSmurf ]

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Beckylein
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I'm sorry if I perhaps mislead others; it certainly wasn't my intention. I was well aware that HPV manifests in places not covered by a condom, though using a condom, or at least as I've been informed, significantly lowers the risk of catching it. I feel pretty well educated on the matter (though rereading my post, I can see where you got what you did you of it), and knew more than my own doctor going into her office. She couldn't answer the questions I asked her about the shot, and that further supported my gut reaction not to get it. I can't get HPV from my male partner, since he's never HAD another partner, except that new studies show that one can.

*This* however, is the sort of information I've been waiting for: http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/health/325845_hpv01.html

That is a way more convincing argument to get the shot than what my GP set out for me ("Get it, or you'll most likely die.") and more convincing than other information I've gotten on the shot. I'm still not willing to be someone's guinea pig, though.

They find out new information continuously; what if their new information 5, 10, 15 years down the line is, "Gardasil can make you infertile" or "The shot can make you more susceptible to other strains of HPV or other STIs". This happens a lot with medicines; medication is produced, deemed OK, and later recalled. Take birth control, for example. It's taken them a while to get HBC to the state that it is in today. My mother and her friends took HBC in the late 60s and early 70s, and it took my mom a pretty long time to conceive me. So many of her friends had fertility struggles that they started to wonder what it might have been that caused this. Sure, it could have been a number of things causing infertility, but HBC was what that group of friends figured it was (my mom's doctor supported her theory), and with the harmful side effects found in the 1980s (20 some years later), that's probably what caused them their struggles.

It took a while for the long-term side effects to get figured out, and so that's why I, personally, don't think it's wise to jump the gun on something so new. Yes, HBC is a VERY good thing today, but in the beginning, millions of women started using it, and some, maybe many, suffered from it. When they get the bugs worked out, or prove with time that there *are* no bugs to work out, maybe I'll suggest it to my daughters. I think it's silly to suggest that it's going to make girls more promiscuous, personally. That side of the argument baffles me (uhh, just look at TV), but it also worries me that women will stop getting paps because they think they don't need them. Not that it's a reason not to get the shot, just that I can see where women would think that they are more protected than they actually might be. Know what I mean by that? Sorry if any of it is unclear [Smile] I'll try to explain better if need be.

And per the medically deeming minors competent, I think that's interesting, since so often the golden age of 18 is the only thing in official eyes that makes someone competent to make their own decisions (at least in my court experience with my parents' divorce).

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"Dance like nobody's watching; love like you've never been hurt; sing like nobody's listening; live like it's heaven on earth." ~Mark Twain

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Light
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Well, this is a vaccination, right? not medication, so the situation is different. Because of the nature of the shot, it's hard to imagine it having a strange effect 15 years down the line, as it really is just teaching your body how to make anti-body's against HPV, and you are not periodically ingesting a drug like in your examples.

Also, the best reason for giving everyone the vaccine is that if you have a population that is half vaccinated and half not, it strongly encourages mutant strains that the vaccine can't protect against. That is the reason that they are giving the vaccine to all the children through the school system, not because they think the 9 year olds are sexually active.

You said you were all for vaccinations, just not this one. What makes the HPV vaccine any different?

[ 08-01-2007, 11:24 PM: Message edited by: Light ]

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Gumdrop Girl
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Y'know, it's 'cause I work in public health and I have a degree in biology, so I really hate this particular scare tactic of telling girls Gardasil is going to make them infertile.

IT AIN'T GONNA MAKE YOU INFERTILE!!!

There is no biologically plausible reason for this vaccine to disrupt fertility. NONE. NADA. ZIP ZILCH ZERO.

But y'know what could really mess up your fertility? CERVICAL CANCER!!! Yeah! Having a hysterectomy at 22 is really going to make conception, gestation and parturition really freakin' difficult.

Gardasil works like EVERY vaccine. It stimulates an immune response. It makes your own immune cells recognize the foreign HPV invaders before they can do any damage. While these strains of HPV happen to affect the reproductive tract, ultimately, the vaccine is not involved with any reproductive functions whatsoever.

If Gardasil prevented the strains of HPV that cause hand and plantar warts, there wouldn't be anybody saying diddly-squat about infertility.

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snail
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Personally, all I recommend is: get the shot lying down, or wait 15 minutes in the doctor's office before you go off and do anything. I got the first Gardasil poke the other day, and passed out right as I was walking out the door, although I'm not squeamish about needles and have never had problems with immunizations before. I looked it up, and fainting is apparently a common HPV vaccine side effect--even commoner than for other immunizations.

I'm not particularly "at risk," as I'm not sexually active and am a lesbian besides, but you know, I'd rather be protected. There were no other issues or allergic reactions, and I plan on getting the second and third shots on schedule. But I shall be lying down, that's for certain. ;P

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What is straight? A line can be straight, or a street, but the human heart, oh, no, it's curved like a road through mountains.

~Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1947

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FuNnY
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holy dooly guys thanks for your adds, ive chosen to get the needles, just letting you know [Smile]

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Potatomasherjim
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Just letting you know, I've done alot of research on the subject and it is actually unkown if Gardasil can cause infertility as the trials for these vaccine only lasted for several years and they only kept track of each person for several weeks after they recieved the vaccine.
Incase you haven't gotten the third yet, I would recommend against it in your case especially as Gardasil will not help you if you are already infected with HPV, and if you are in a long term relationship then if you have it already, you have it and if you don't, you don't and arn't going to [Smile]

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JamsessionVT
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You know, it's already been established, by someone with extensive knowledge about medicine and the biomechanics of these things, that Gardasil DOES NOT cause infertility. We don't have a high tolerance for those who come to contradict with information we know is incorrect and misleading. If you are going to come here an argue that point, please refrain from posting.

The point has also been made (and noted in the advertisments as well) that Gardasil is not a treatment for HPV.

You've already posted in another HPV thread, and that thread has been removed, as it's misleading. If all you plan to do here is tell users not to get the vaccine, go find another hobby, because it won't be tolerated.

[ 12-18-2007, 06:43 PM: Message edited by: JamsessionVT ]

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Abbie
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eryn_smiles
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Hey guys,
Just wanted to clarify something from your article: The HPV Vaccine FAQ

"Pap smears can detect cervical abnormalities early, so if precancerous cells appear, they can be treated early and save your life and health. This is especially important in terms of HPV, because with the types that can cause cervical cancer, there is a "too late" when it comes to testing: the CDC states that within just two years, cervical HPV infection usually becomes undetectable."

When you say within 2 years HPV infection becomes undetectable, do you mean that HPV cannot be detected in a pap smear or that it cannot be detected by DNA test? What is the test that detects cervical HPV infx prior to 2 years? Because the main purpose of the pap smear is to detect precancerous cervical changes rather than to pick up HPV infx of the cervix, right?

I also read this to mean that the cervical HPV infx becomes undetectable UNTIL precancerous changes appear and thats why everyone needs pap smears - is this right?

I read your link to CDC about this too but got a bit confused...

Cheers

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eryn_smiles
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Bump....thanks in advance for answering my question!
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Heather
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Sorry to have missed this, eryn. And yep: you're understanding it just fine as I understand it. [Smile]

It's the pap smear which shows cellular changes that can indicate HPV infection (when there are not other visible symptoms, such as warts from a wart strain, those those strains are not known to cause cervical cancer), and after around two years, unless cellular changes occur due to cancer and the lot, it's not going to be detectable.

And yep: this is why women need pap smears every year, without fail.

Just FYI, the DNA test is usually only given to women over 30.

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hunnybunny888
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We get the flu shot every year, but people still get the flu, how do we know it won't be the same with this?
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Heather
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Well, in part because a lot of research was done to assure the vaccine worked, and it's made clear that no vaccination is ever a 100% guarantee against infection. It helps reduce risks, like any vaccine does.

And the flu shot, for instance, has prevented a LOT of people from getting the flu. Only a very small percentage of people who get vaccinated will get the flu in a given season, as compared to the number of people who will get the flu without the vaccine.

If everyone who got the flu shot still got the flu -- or even a substantial number of people -- people would not be returning every year for flu vaccine.

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Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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Leabug
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(Also, from what I understand, keep in mind that the virus that causes the flu is constantly evolving new strains, so it's a little harder to make sure a vaccine covers them all when new ones develop.)

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Lea

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