Donate Now
  New Poll  
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sexual Ethics and Politics » Sex, religion, and guilt - general thoughts

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Sex, religion, and guilt - general thoughts
pamplemousse
Neophyte
Member # 96224

Icon 5 posted      Profile for pamplemousse     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I want to open up a discussion about something I've been dealing with personally and have seen other people dealing with on these forums - basically, the huge heap of guilt that seems to accompany sex for those of us who are religious or who were brought up that way.

I'm a practicing Catholic and for the most part am very happy with my religion. I have a more liberal, social justice-focused view of Catholicism and so I haven't always been so hung up on issues of personal morality/chastity, etc. I decided early on that I would probably not wait until marriage to have sex, but that I would try to wait until I was in a strong relationship and it felt right. I also don't REALLY like guys that easily, so it hadn't been much of an issue. It didn't happen until the end of June (I'm 23) and I was not officially in a relationship with my partner at that point, but we are now. He is an atheist, but this isn't an issue for me at this point in the relationship, especially because I've had my own periods of religious doubt.

Here's the issue I'm running into: I see a lot of very intelligent advice on these forums about only having kinds of sex you're comfortable with and ready for. I seem to be incredibly conflicted - literally in two minds - about what these are. When I'm with my partner, I feel completely at ease. He's very respectful and has made it clear that he genuinely cares about me. I'm incredibly attracted to him and aroused during sex. However, afterwards, I feel as though I'm a completely different person. I start having severe anxiety and intense feelings of religious guilt. These also manifest themselves as irrational pregnancy concerns - even now that I've been on the pill for two weeks, and that we used condoms perfectly this past weekend when we were together, I find myself going through all kinds of horrible scenarios in my mind. I read one of the longer Q&As where Heather discussed how this severe anxiety is common when people feel extreme guilt - as though we'll be punished for choosing to have sex through a very natural consequence. Part of this could be the circumstances - we met very shortly before I went home for five weeks, and I just got back and spent a few days with him, but he left this morning to go home for two weeks. So it's possible that I have positive sexual experiences with him and feel a little lost when we're apart so quickly afterwards. That will end soon, when he's back. My general mood seems to dictate how I feel about the situation as well - if I'm around people and happy, my anxiety lessens, but if I'm alone, I can't stop dwelling, worrying, and feeling like a religious hypocrite.

I don't necessarily have a specific question, but I'd be very interested to hear anyone else's experiences with feelings of guilt, brought on by religious or moral codes, after having sex. Did it go away eventually? Did you find it to be a clue that you weren't actually ready for sex? And if you're still religious, how do you contextualize the sex you're having with your beliefs? Is it an issue for you? Part of the issue is that, as a Catholic, I know that the true essence of the teaching on premarital sex is that sex is so powerful and meaningful that it should be reserved for someone you are truly and deeply in love with, in marriage. I worry that I'm hurting myself - my soul, my future ability to truly love, or something like that - by having sex with someone outside of marriage. But at other times, it seeems perfectly right and not an issue at all.

Sorry this is so long! I'd really like to hear what other people have to say [Smile]

Posts: 25 | From: Florida/Indiana | Registered: Jul 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pamplemousse
Neophyte
Member # 96224

Icon 1 posted      Profile for pamplemousse     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
http://www.scarleteen.com/forum/ultimatebb.php?/ubb/get_topic/f/8/t/001484.html

just saw this thread too - definitely relevant! I just would really like the guilt and anxiety to go away. This thread touches on the figurative, literary interpretations that are common in Catholicism, so when I think of things from that perspective, it does make me feel better.

Posts: 25 | From: Florida/Indiana | Registered: Jul 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sans
Peer Ambassador
Member # 91788

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Sans     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hey, pamplemousse! This is certainly an interesting topic for discussion. Currently, I identify as agnostic and do not associate with any religion, but I was brought up as a Christian (unsure as to the denomination) with extremely strict "codes of conduct" in regards to sexuality and everything else, let's say.

My former church had been more of a cult than a community of religious/faith-based worshippers, although the members claimed otherwise. We youth were told that premarital sex, dating, queer sexuality, non-binary gender identity, masturbation, and poly-amorous relationships were strictly forbidden. Harsh criticisms, rumours, and segregation were used as methods to "punish" those who "strayed from the path". False allegations of homosexuality were even started against some with the intention of humiliating them.

For most of my young adolescent and adolescent years, I had experienced intense guilt in relation to the sexually-charged dreams I sometimes had, the desire to explore my body, and a developing sexual drive. I berated myself constantly for my "sinful" thoughts and tried to amend by praying and uttering repeated phrases. I felt filthy every time I desired sexual relief. And, yes, I have also experienced intense, irrational pregnancy scares despite never coming into contact with a member of the opposite sex. I thought that it would be my punishment for thinking thoughts of a sexual nature.

All of the aforementioned guilt and anxiety dissipated when I became no longer religious and when I considered sex from what we might call a "secular" viewpoint.

So that is how it was for me.

--------------------
"Sneak away, sneak away / If the fate is too sad / You are not a flower of hell / That kind of place... / Don't become lost, don't become lost... / Or you won't be able to grasp the entangled hand / The cry also has a limit...." - Naraku no Hana

Posts: 537 | From: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Dec 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
copper86
Peer Ambassador
Member # 95710

Icon 1 posted      Profile for copper86     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Pamplemousse;

I feel so much the way you do surrounding sex, religion, and guilt. I was raised Christian and still identify as one; but I was taught from an early age not to have sex until marriage. Even when I dated, it was never an issue; until I was around 20 and wanted a sexual relationship with my partner. I am a very spiritual person, so this was something that knocked me off my feet. I was so scared - and still feel that way sometimes - that God was mad at me for having sex of any kind. I got on the pill and never told my parents because I thought they'd be ashamed of me (and chain me to my bed) if they found out I was having sex. They're conservative and I just don't feel comfortable telling them about this. I feel like you do - like an entirely different, happy, aroused person during sex, and then when I get home or am alone, I think God is angry with me, and He'll punish me in some random way. So I have irrational pregnancy fears too; and I sometimes think that will be how He punishes me. So, you are definitely not alone in feeling these things.

I spoke to the Chaplain at my former university about this, and she gave me some very good input. God made everything, including sex, and He is present in all things, too. He made sex as something to be enjoyed, and if there is respect between the people engaging in it, then sex can be a wonderful thing. That calmed me down a bit, but I admit that my spirituality and my sexual desires still clash heads a lot; and I'm left feeling guilty and very scared. I pretty much get surprised whenever I get a withdrawal bleed.

If it helps, try to remember that God is not vengeful and He lets us make our own choices. If we engage in sex, I doubt He'd hit us over the head with a stick or something. I once spoke of my guilt to one of my doctors (yes, I'm that honest sometimes! Lol); and she said, "What kind of God is that that you think He'd do that to you?" That kind of stuck with me... She didn't ask it rudely, but I think she made me think about how much God (or any god one felt connected to) loved me and that if He did, He wouldn't irrationally punish me.

I've been struggling with my religion and my sexual desires off and on for two years; but I think over time, since I pray and do a lot of thinking about this, it also boils down to how you feel. If you can feel comfortable with the types of sex that you are doing; and if you can pray about it and are able to be honest with God about how you feel, I think that is a really major step in being okay with all this.

I wish I could help you instead of giving you my own story, but since I did get some comfort from a Chaplain, is there any religious figure you can go to to talk about this? You say you are Catholic - is there anyone in your church, even a friend there or priest, that you feel comfortable enough to divulge this information? This sounds like a very common issue and I think that churches should just discuss premarital sex. It doesn't make anyone out to be monsters or hypocrites - if you want to do it and it fits into your beief system, then I don't think you can be a hypocrite. Your life is ultimately between you and God; not you, God, your family, the church, and your friends. Know what I mean? It's up to you what you want to engage in and you and your faith work that out. As far as I'm concerned, it is no one else's business and no one has the right to tell you "you're wrong" or "you shouldn't do that."

I truly hope that you feel better, and I hope that your guilt diminishes soon. I will be thinking of you! I also apologize for layering this post with religion - if you are at all uncomfortable, please disregard it! That is how I deal with my sexuality and my faith, but I would definitely suggest talking to someone about it if you think that would help! Take care!

--------------------
"I do the best that I can. I'm just what I am." - Rush (Best I Can)

Posts: 692 | From: Canada | Registered: May 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
beatrice889
Neophyte
Member # 96394

Icon 1 posted      Profile for beatrice889     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
This topic definitely caught my eye.
I've been raised in a Christian household. I've gone to a very Christian school all my life, but my parents are not too strict and they have never "forced" anything on me. I'm about to go off to a private Christian college pretty soon here by my choice.
I have faced this problem a lot. I've had a boyfriend for two years now who is also Christian, and we've chosen to not have sex at this point. Lots of kids our age judge us for it- but we know it's what we should do.
It is so hard for religious people who try to follow scripture to know what to do in the "how far is too far" debate. it's clear sex is out of the question- but we still express ourselves sexually. We've actually used guilt as a big force in what we should and shouldn't do, because the bible does not say "you shall not touch her boobs until you're married" so, we've drawn lines. we've made out, and we've made out a lot. we've gone farther, we've gone *too* far and decided we shouldn't do that anymore after we realized we had guilty hearts. and i think we have found a good balance for what is ok, so we can still release sexual tension and be loving with each other but not cross the lines. i think that line might be different for every couple.
Some christians/catholics say any expression of sexuality with someone else is wrong- i don't think that's the case.
So that's just what I've done. Keep in mind, we can become desensitized to our guilt. it isn't the only force that should be guiding our actions.
Lots of times I find myself thinking "was that ok...?" and i read internet articles and talk to other Christians and my siblings and see what *they've* done. but i don't think it's the kind of thing that you compare with other people and other couples. and really, the best place to go usually isn't articles or other people, but pray about it and go to God directly.
Good luck, hope that helps [Smile]

Posts: 7 | From: United States | Registered: Jul 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
beatrice889
Neophyte
Member # 96394

Icon 1 posted      Profile for beatrice889     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
This topic definitely caught my eye.
I've been raised in a Christian household. I've gone to a very Christian school all my life, but my parents are not too strict and they have never "forced" anything on me. I'm about to go off to a private Christian college pretty soon here by my choice.
I have faced this problem a lot. I've had a boyfriend for two years now who is also Christian, and we've chosen to not have sex at this point. Lots of kids our age judge us for it- but we know it's what we should do.
It is so hard for religious people who try to follow scripture to know what to do in the "how far is too far" debate. it's clear sex is out of the question- but we still express ourselves sexually. We've actually used guilt as a big force in what we should and shouldn't do, because the bible does not say "you shall not touch her boobs until you're married" so, we've drawn lines. we've made out, and we've made out a lot. we've gone farther, we've gone *too* far and decided we shouldn't do that anymore after we realized we had guilty hearts. and i think we have found a good balance for what is ok, so we can still release sexual tension and be loving with each other but not cross the lines. i think that line might be different for every couple.
Some christians/catholics say any expression of sexuality with someone else is wrong- i don't think that's the case.
So that's just what I've done. Keep in mind, we can become desensitized to our guilt. it isn't the only force that should be guiding our actions.
Lots of times I find myself thinking "was that ok...?" and i read internet articles and talk to other Christians and my siblings and see what *they've* done. but i don't think it's the kind of thing that you compare with other people and other couples. and really, the best place to go usually isn't articles or other people, but pray about it and go to God directly.
Good luck, hope that helps [Smile]

Posts: 7 | From: United States | Registered: Jul 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
awritersfix
Neophyte
Member # 95752

Icon 1 posted      Profile for awritersfix     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hi pamplemousse,

You know, the internet is such a valuable resource. It helps you realize you are not quite alone in your struggle. I was just going through this all weekend.

I've been of the Christian faith all my life and still very much identify with it. I was also raised very conservatively; even homeschooled until college, and then I went to a Christian college also. I didn't even grow up with guys other than seeing them for a brief few minutes at church on weekends. So imagine the huge pandora's box this was when I faced my own sexual desires. lol Sex wasn't really discussed openly in my home either until after college. It was something I was left on my own to find out about. General moral (and religious) knowledge given about it was "DON'T DO IT". Save yourself for marriage, and "good girls keep their legs closed". I was also threatened with the idea that if I ever did have premarital sex (in any form), I would be kicked out of the house.

Having to find out sex on my own made me insatiably curious about it; the more I learned and the more friends I had who were of my faith but were "doing it", the more I inched towards sexual relationships. I officially started experimenting sexually around 18 (when I went to college), and started having "real sex" (i guess if you can call it that...it's all sex in some form to me lol) in my 20s (I'm also 23 now). Because I attended a Christian college, the majority of my activities had be to kept on the low due to school rules and judgmental friends. As much as I love sex, I feel as though it has put a moral clash between my struggle to maintain a spiritual walk, and my own physical needs. This struggle became ultimately apparent in my last "rollercoaster" relationship, where my ex, also conservatively raised, had the same high sexual drive as me. Instead of mutually handling our sexual relationship together, we let it split us part terribly, believing that premarital sex would lessen his feelings of love, care, and respect for me.

I've also had my share of irrational pregnancy fears, mainly just caused from guilt. I feel as though pregnancy would just HAVE to happen, because God was displeased with what I did. I find myself praying hard for my period to come and bargaining on my sexuality, even though I know fully well protection didn't fail.

So to answer your question, dealing with sex within a religious arena is...an individual choice, ultimately. But it definitely is a hard one. There's a sense of defiance knowing you're acting on your natural urges, but have been taught to resist them. Personally, premarital sex is an issue for me...but at the same time it isn't. I don't quite know how to handle my "sexual self", and am struggling with the fact that I can still be a Christian even though I stumble in this area.

I know dealing with this issue got somewhat better for me when I discovered I could share this "other side" with atleast one or two mutually trusted female friends who were struggling with the same thing (if males are more comfortable for you, that's fine too...however, in my experience, my talking openly about sex with my "religious" guy friends ended up sexually). Are your friends of the same religious faith open-minded to discussing this? That may help, if you don't want to go to a counselor just yet. Support systems always help you feel more comforted in decisions like these. And I do agree on the fact that churches should be more open to discussing sex in a "real-world" forum, because it leaves so many of us in shambles when we do encounter it without the proper way to deal with it.

I worry as well that I'm hurting myself and "blighting" my chance to really know true love, so I do identify with you in that aspect. Especially given that the majority of my sexual experience did not happen in a relationship setting where guys really cared for me outside of sexual attraction.

But take heart... Logically speaking, I would like to believe that even though we were taught better, we are still human. And if you are in a relationship where sex happens, and you and your partner have a mutual understanding and acceptance of it, I believe it is ok. Whether you chose to continue having sex also should be something that you both come to agreement on as a whole. Also, pray about it as well.

Sorry for the long post, but I hope this helps in some way!

[ 08-06-2012, 01:41 AM: Message edited by: awritersfix ]

Posts: 17 | Registered: May 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pamplemousse
Neophyte
Member # 96224

Icon 1 posted      Profile for pamplemousse     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thanks for some seriously great responses! It's so interesting to hear what other people think and definitely reassuring to hear that other people have had irrational worries and feelings of guilt.

I keep coming back to the fact that I truly, personally, don't think premarital sex is wrong when I sit down and think it through. I also want to stay away from using the word "wrong" because I am not in the business of judging things like that for anyone. In my opinion, organized religion focuses way too much on issues of personal morality and not enough on social justice. That being said, I know I'll never be comfortable with the idea of casual sex because it doesn't fit into my belief system. Sex with a partner with some level of commitment and mutual respect fits just fine. So going by my own belief system, what I'm engaging in now shouldn't make me feel so guilty.

Biblically speaking, there's very little that actually bans premarital sex, and circumstances are so incredibly different in today's world. I don't see a reason to give preference to one obscure Old Testament law while others are completely ignored and out of context. The problem for me, at least in Catholicism, is the idea of "tradition". Catholics believe in following both Scripture and Tradition, since we trace our lineage straight back to the original church. That's where a lot of this more personal morality belief comes from. Those have been so ingrained into me that whether or not I actually think about it, I now feel guilty and incredibly worried that I'm disappointing God/my family/myself. I love the big ideas present in my religion and the kind of intellectual feel I've experienced in it. I feel like I'm trying to rationalize having sex with my religion, and that somehow, I'm not a "true" Catholic if I'm deliberately disagreeing with the Church on a certain point. I know how ridiculous this sounds to people who aren't religious, and I understand completely, because I'm a thinker and I've raised my own major religious doubts before. But it's there and it's something I have to work around.

My main concern is setting these pregnancy fears aside because I feel like I can't function until I have confirmation that my life as I know it will continue. Again, ridiculous, but true.

Posts: 25 | From: Florida/Indiana | Registered: Jul 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MusicNerd
Peer Ambassador
Member # 95998

Icon 1 posted      Profile for MusicNerd     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
(RAPE TRIGGER WARNING - it's referenced when mentioning rape in the Bible in the 3rd paragraph of this post)

Well, I was baptized Catholic and I used to go to a Catholic school before I went to a different non-Catholic middle school.

Even though I've never had sex of any kind with anyone before, I used to feel guilty about masturbation. Every time I did it, I would feel bad about myself afterwards. Physically I felt good having sexual thoughts and masturbating, but emotionally I would feel remorse and would think that I would go to hell for having sexual desires. When I was younger, I used to think that I was going to wait until marriage in order to have sex, but then I realized that that wasn’t my cup of tea; waiting until marriage or religion. I’m now an atheist, but I understand how you feel when it comes to sexual guilt stemming from religious beliefs since I used to feel that same way.

I just thought I'd point out (since you believe in the Bible, I'm assuming) that Adam and Eve weren't married when they had sex, so that would mean non-marital sex in their case. [Smile] I agree with you in that it's interesting how only certain things in the Bible are selected even though, theoretically speaking, the entire Bible is supposed to be "the word of God". For example (I forget which parts of the Bible these are in, since it's been a while), a rapist can marry his rape victim, a soldier can marry his prisoner of war, slaveowners can pair up and marry off their slaves, and "sodomy" is considered a sin. Also, if men having sex together is considered a "sin" to some, then it seems to me that lesbianism and female bisexuality would be off the hook then, right? That's not the case though, since some Christians (and some people of other faiths) consider homosexuality and bisexuality for all sexes to be a "sin"; based on discrepancies like this (and the Adam and Eve one mentioned above), I think that what people consider to be "right" or "wrong" in religion is quite subjective and dependent on the person. I think for the most part, we as a society don't agree with these notions anymore (except some people still think homophobia/biphobia is totally okay) and I think that over time, society tries (along with individuals) to pick and choose which parts of the Bible to believe in order to match it up with their mindset at the time.

I hope that you will one day feel comfortable enough with your faith and sex life coexisting, since what really matters is that there's whole-hearted consent from all parties involved and that you and your partner(s) are educated on birth control.

As for your pregnancy fears, where do you think they come from? Do you think that this guilt has manifested itself into fear of being "punished" for having sexual desires and acting on them with someone consensually?

--------------------
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." ~Dr. Seuss

Posts: 301 | From: a galaxy far, far away... | Registered: Jun 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
naplement
Activist
Member # 46362

Icon 1 posted      Profile for naplement     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Oh yes, I used to be a catholic too (now I am somewhere on agnostic territory), and I know the irrational pregnancy fears.


My own story is that I was busy being traumatized by other things and thinking that I won't find a guy wanting to be my boyfriend anyway for a long time, so the question of sex with others hadn't even arisen. Then I got (surprisingly) to be wanted. I remember my first hug and a night of clothed cuddles, and the endorphine (and emotional) high after. I felt good, but when alone, the theory came back to bite me, I got to doubt if our relationship is serious enough for me to feel this good. And I disagreed with this, but the guilt prevailed.

In our corner of the world, the social teachings of Catholicism are not taken that seriously, but the hierarchical nature is accentuated, so I began to feel that if I keep believing my un-Pope-compatible beliefs, but keep pretending like I submit to the hierarchy, then I will commit a kind o fakery, so I felt better making it official.

But I am glad for you if you have found a community which works differently.

What I want to say is that the guilt is part f the secondary culture, but I don't consider it to be part of the core, and given that you already feel like this, I think you can be successful in reprogramming your brain. (I do my own reprogramming with a therapist.)

Do you know Anthony de Mello, the jesuit and psychologist who has lived in India and wrote books about meditation amongst others? He is considered officially not 100% catholic, but I really liked (as a catholic! and I got them from a nun!) his book on meditation. (It was also based on western mystic traditions). It has really simple things and exercises, and a lot of them focus on trying to understand, in the moment, how we are being loved by God - yes, it sounds almost sinfully hedonistic of thinking about it too long, but hey, it IS the official line (and the hope on which all of the rest of faith is based). One exercise I remember is concentrating on breathing, combined with the theory that God is everywhere, so it uses the metaphor/personification that He is in the air we breath, the thing that sustains us... (I don''t rememebr exactly but I wouldn't want to reproduce it here without the context either.) Rituals are things we do to make abstract, intangible things tangible, to express ourselves, we do them for us, not for God, because we need the tactile symbols, so his exercises are ways of communication and making concrete symbols.

He does write about where he thinks the line between these and self-hypnosis lies, so he does know that there are problems to answer, but generally what he writes sounds consistent.

I guess doing these exercises might help you stabilize yourself, and maybe there are things that can be useful in making yourself relax in the middle of a worrying episode too.

(Writing this makes me nostalgic, and a bit envious for your belief. But I can't just make myself believe. I guess it will get better with the work on my earthly relationships and problems.)

Sorry if this was on a tangent, or repeating things that are cliches in your circles - I have no way of knowing. Good luck!

Posts: 124 | From: hungary | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
naplement
Activist
Member # 46362

Icon 1 posted      Profile for naplement     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
wow, I just looked De Mello up, and realized that the western sound of his name + the fact that he was a Jesuit + racist preconceptions made me automatically suppose that he was just "living in" India, after going there from his birthplace Europe. In fact he was born in Bombay and wasn't white at all (as far as I know).

Damn you, racist subroutines of my brain. And "Catholic" even means "universal"! On the other hand this might explain why I haven't seen any portraits of him in the books - the editors were trying to whitewash him too? [Frown] Anyway, I don't want to derail the conversation.

Posts: 124 | From: hungary | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WesLuck
Activist
Member # 56822

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WesLuck     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
After reading Sageing While Ageing and another subsequent Shirley MacLaine book, I changed from atheist to agnostic. Which means to me I believe in the God Source but not any organised religion. It is partly logic and partly intuition, but I got enough decent evidence from the books to believe that we are all made of the God Source, so essentially, we are made up of God and we ARE God too. [Smile] And a question to ponder... "If there was really nothing here before the start of the universe or universes, why would something have popped into existence for no reason at all?" That is a very logical question, I think. [Smile] Also, in a logical sense it isn't really any harder to believe that we have come here in multiple incarnations (with karma) than our consciousness came here once and once only.

Do you know that Christianity used to believe in reincarnation until certain people got together in Byzantine times and co-opted the removal of those teachings? In a way, it is easier to have control over people if a religion teaches that one life is the only one you've got and if you do something bad you'll be shamed permanently.

[ 08-07-2012, 09:21 AM: Message edited by: WesLuck ]

Posts: 540 | From: Australia | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

  New Poll   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3