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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sexual Ethics and Politics » What, do YOU think, should be taught for sex ed in school?

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Author Topic: What, do YOU think, should be taught for sex ed in school?
Sans
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Let's discuss! [Smile]

I think that my classmates and I would've benefitted a lot from learning about LGBTQUIA sexuality from a non hetero-normative perspective. The curriculum that I was exposed to centered exclusively around heterosexuality, actually.

Another topic that I think should've been taught at my school is the different types of sex, including masturbation, as my teachers referred to only penis-in-vagina intercourse when talking about everything, really, including STI's.

I also would've loved to learn about gender identity and societally imposed gender roles, as I have always felt restricted by what others percieve as being "acceptable" and "proper" behaviour for a woman, which includes many misconceptions, especially when it comes to partner/familial abuse. Instead of dispelling these myths, my sex ed classes only served to reinforce them.

So, again, what, do YOU think, should be taught in school sex ed classes?

Let's hear it!

[ 03-08-2012, 04:04 PM: Message edited by: SansNom ]

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"Sneak away, sneak away / If the fate is too sad / You are not a flower of hell / That kind of place... / Don't become lost, don't become lost... / Or you won't be able to grasp the entangled hand / The cry also has a limit...." - Naraku no Hana

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BrightStar171
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Ooh! One big thing that I think a lot of sex ed classes should include is a discussion of how to communicate and negotiate about sex with a partner.

I also really, really think that sex ed classes should cover local age of consent and statutory rape laws, because a lot of times young people just don't have any way to know what the laws are that apply to them.

Actually, I suppose they should probably also cover other legal things too- like in most states, how men can be held responsible for child support even if they're under 18. A lot of people don't know that. And information about what legal barriers exist to abortion, especially for young people (it's sad that they do, but young people should be informed about what they are so that they know what to expect- and for those that have judicial bypasses, young people should be informed about that option).

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Sans
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I most definitely agree with you on all of your points, BrightStar171.

Communication and negotiation are absolutely NUMBER ONE in any kind of relationship, not to mention a sexual relationship where partners are investing so much trust in one another.

Discussing the meaning of consent is also essential. I think that there are many who are engaged in sexual relationships who do not fully understand consent, which ends up hurting a lot people.

The legal aspect of engaging in a sexual relationship, which includes consent, child support, abortion, etc., is extremely important to know. Yes, I definitely agree that young people should know all these things to be able to make fully informed choices for ourselves. [Smile]

[ 03-09-2012, 09:25 PM: Message edited by: SansNom ]

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"Sneak away, sneak away / If the fate is too sad / You are not a flower of hell / That kind of place... / Don't become lost, don't become lost... / Or you won't be able to grasp the entangled hand / The cry also has a limit...." - Naraku no Hana

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Sans
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Upon further thought,

I simply find it illogical how the ones responsible of determining the curriculum for school sex ed had neglected to include a full definition and explanation of consent (in my school at least), since the whole "yes is yes, and no is yes" misconception can be so widespread, misleading, and harmful. I'd think that the topic of consent is one of the most important ones for ANY sex ed curriculum. Why exactly they had omitted this discussion from the classes in my school is completely beyond me.

I know for a fact that there were several instances in my school where people who were sexually active with a partner were abused by said partner, possibly as a result of the misunderstanding of consent, what it means to give it, or because consent, to the abusers, was an nonexistent element in the relationship. For example, there was one female who was gravely injured by her partner when she refused to have sex with him. Apparently, this partner believed that, by being in a relationship with her, he was entitled to have sex with her whenever he felt like it.

I am wondering if the frequency of the occurances of situations like the one described above can be lessened if consent were to be discussed in detail during sex ed classes, along with the full legal implications when consent is violated/not given in a sexual relationship. For sure there will always be those who understand the necessity of consent and will proceed to ignore it anyways, but I believe that education does make a difference for some, if not most, folks. What do you think about that?

I also know that violence and abuse are, unfortunately, common in dating relationships. But can that be partly attributed to the fact that consent is not exactly talked about, and that what little most people know about it can very well turn out to be false? I'm thinking about that right now.

Any theories or thoughts?

[ 03-11-2012, 09:14 PM: Message edited by: SansNom ]

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"Sneak away, sneak away / If the fate is too sad / You are not a flower of hell / That kind of place... / Don't become lost, don't become lost... / Or you won't be able to grasp the entangled hand / The cry also has a limit...." - Naraku no Hana

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Sans
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I was reminded of this topic today while I was sitting in class. Every day, I see many heterocentric and patriarchy-normative ideologies being tossed around by students and teachers alike, from usage of common slang to language used to insult others. I thought: heteronormativity, now that I have seen some of its impact on both heterosexual and LGBTQUIA folks, would've been such a stimulating and eye-opening topic to cover during sex ed class, particularly because many people are not aware of it.

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"Sneak away, sneak away / If the fate is too sad / You are not a flower of hell / That kind of place... / Don't become lost, don't become lost... / Or you won't be able to grasp the entangled hand / The cry also has a limit...." - Naraku no Hana

Posts: 537 | From: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Dec 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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