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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sexual Ethics and Politics » Explicit lyrics

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Author Topic: Explicit lyrics
Djuna
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I was hanging out with my sister the other day, and we were listening to her music. I was really shocked to hear some not necessarily explicit, but very suggestive lyrics - I think the song was Buttonz by the Pussycat Dolls (like I said, my sister's music [Wink] ), and I didn't say anything at the time, because my sis can get really angry sometimes, but it got me thinking, what kind of message is this sending? The album -NOW 64 I think - didn't have a 'Parental Advisory - Explicit Lyrics' sticker or anything, so presumably some quite young girls (and boys, but that's not really part of this rant) would be listening. And basically the message is that promiscuity is fashionable and good. It just kind of worried me, but then I still see my little sis (now 14) as a little girl really. What does anyone else think about this or am I just being a prude?

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“In a strange room, before you are emptied for sleep, what are you. And when you are filled with sleep you never were. I don’t know what I am. I don’t know if I am or not... how often have I lain beneath rain on a strange roof, thinking of home.”

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Faith54
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Well, for me it's a tricky issue. I don't think children should be listening to explicit lyrics, but it is the artist's right and censorship is just bad, in my opinion. I think there's a difference between kids just listening to the music, and kids taking the message to heart. When my boyfriend's little sister sings songs like Buttonz, I don't mind because I know in no way is she promiscuous or even interested in guys yet (she's 13). She just thinks it's catchy. However, when girls start buying skimpy clothes or boys start calling girls "hos", then it's a problem- but one to be addressed by the parents. The artist can put out whatever music he or she likes, it's up to the parents to monitor if it's affecting their child.

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"My grandmother never gave gifts- she was too busy being raped by cossacks." ~ Woody Allen

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Djuna
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Well of course, but then the sad fact is that many parents wouldn't do this.
Artistic freedom is very important, and being a songwriter and pianist (currently seeking guitarist, bassist, singer and drummer) myself, I understand that. It just kinda bugs me at times. I think a big part of it is that it's my little sister. Like I read Noughts and Crosses (great book - for those that haven't read it, it's got some explicit scenes in it) and my sister asked to read it after a while. I was talking to my friend about how it bothered me her reading that (I said 'yes' though in the end) and she said that it's nothing she doesn't know already (true, probably) and she didn't see any problem.
I suppose maybe part of the problem is because I'm a guy with a sister, whereas my friend's a girl with a sister. Does anyone else find that the gender of their sibling makes a difference in how they treat them, without meaning to be sexist?

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“In a strange room, before you are emptied for sleep, what are you. And when you are filled with sleep you never were. I don’t know what I am. I don’t know if I am or not... how often have I lain beneath rain on a strange roof, thinking of home.”

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kitka
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In my case, yeah. I don't have a sister, but it seems like sisters commiserate rather than protect. My older bro is really protective of me. Which is cool. It sounds to me like you are being a good older brother, trying to shield your little sister from stuff that weirds you out, in relation to her. Where do your parents stand on all this?

p.s. I play bass - but I'm too far away from the ocean to be of any help to you! Good luck with your art.

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not_a_hobgoblin
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I've found that the parental advisory warnings focus on key "bad words," instead of on degrading messages. I'm a huge fan of Staind, and while some of their albums have warnings, the lyrics are some of the most intelligent and meaningful lyrics in the genre. So labels don't help the parents much at all.

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"Cut her down."
"She is a witch!"
"But she's our witch. Cut her down."

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hunnybunny888
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see its odd because by censoring are children we are doing the exact same thing to them as if they are not censored.
Please do not take this offensively, I think it is very sweet when parents and older siblings are protecting their children but it comes down to this: we all want to manipulate our children instead of teaching them to think for themselves.

SO we don't want them to learn bad words or hear about sex or violence at a young age so they will not repeat what they see and hear (which is a good thing), so we censor, we put out warnings and ratings,and show are kids what we want so they will get positively influenced by good words and love and happiness.

It is a very nice idea to keep a childs innocence as long as possible but when it comes down to it they will be exposed to all this stuff eventually. SO even though they have gotten the positive influence by childhood, which is very good, they will go out with friends and watch the media which will have more contorl over them than parents when they are older and they will be influenced by that, and come out with some good morals still form their childhood but still alot of bad ideas from their teen and preteen years.

Now, if in the begining we didn't censor, we didn't protect, but taught children ourselves, what's right, wha'ts wrong, what's good what's bad, how to make good decisions, what their thought process should be in order to make a good desicion, learning to watch things and be able to realize its not real, and its not how to act in real life. TO encourage independent thought. If we can create this strong base in our children, they will be very hard to influence at all and we will not have to worry about censorship because they will be able to think for themselves instead of believe what they see on TV. BY the time a child is 6 they are capable of independent thought, and by that time they should be able to be exposed to the world, of course at that time they are still young ang growing and need our guidance, but if they are thinking independently they are set for life

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Djuna
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Well, my parents are real prudes to be honest. I had to try not to laugh the other day when they said 'a few' people my age are sexually active.
Anyway, that's a good point about censorship being damaging - although some adults in their 20s or 30s I know have been pretty scarred by 18 (R) rated films. What kind of effect could this have on children?

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“In a strange room, before you are emptied for sleep, what are you. And when you are filled with sleep you never were. I don’t know what I am. I don’t know if I am or not... how often have I lain beneath rain on a strange roof, thinking of home.”

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DarkChild717
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Bear in mind that to a certain extent, people are told what to be squeamish about. For a simple example, a mother or father is afraid of spiders, sees one, and freaks out. Their child sees this, and learns to fear spiders. Those same parents can try and harness their own fear of the spiders, and prevent teaching their child to be afraid of spiders.

By the same token, if someone was never truly taught that film violence was false, or that sexuality is okay, or what have you, than seeing it can be shocking. So, yes, a 30 year old person can be shocked at something like that. I'm fortunate in that I was always told that violence on TV wasn't real. I was never told to be afraid of my own sexuality, or to think of it as bad thing. So censoring being damaging is a good observation to make.

To answer your question, the effect on children will be what they were taught, and how it's balanced out with messages from family and peers.

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Caylin, Scarleteen Volunteer
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Guiltygard
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well candy shop by 50cent is like that so is lollipop by mika and everybodys gona love today by mika

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A guy walks up to me and goes "big shoes, big shoes, please!"
Whats up with that?

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DarkChild717
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(Guiltygard, we really appreciate you adding to and bringing back up great topics, but in the future, can you use proper English with punctuation, etc? It makes it easier for others to understand what you're saying and what you mean. Thanks!)

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Caylin, Scarleteen Volunteer
Love Scarleteen? Donations keep us around for you. So give a little! (Or a lot. Whatever works for you.)

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lexie
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i dont know the song mentioned here, but i have two younger sisters, and i understand the sort of protectiveness you mean. im not close with them, but i sort of dont want them to become how i was at their ages (they are 13 and 15).

im not really into that sort of music they like, but (this is going to sound so.. prudish and vague) its all that sort of stuff, where you think.. "er.. did that just say what i thought it did?"

i hate the way my younger sister dresses in provocative clothing, just because its what all her friends wear - when shes 13, when she used to be so innocent, she says she has a boyfriend, and she hangs around with the kind of girls, that in your grade you know you wouldnt have liked, and were rather.. "promiscuous" (for lack of a better word) to me, for 12 and 13 year olds.

i dont have a problem, i suppose, with songs being explicit. sexually or otherwise, heck some of the music i do enjoy could be considered like that. its just that when they are aimed at young adolescents, i do.

sorry for any generalisations here, and expressing of my opinions on promiscurity at what i feel is a young age.

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Djuna
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I'm surprised that this topic is still ticking over even now as I come back. [Big Grin]
As for 13 year olds saying they have a boyfriend, more often than not that's the thing of everyone's starting to become adults, and it's seen as cool for a girl to have a boyfriend (or insert sexual preference here).
And for the record, I remember claiming to have a girlfriend at the age of 6. In fact I vividly remember me and Kirsty Wood being called to the headmistress' office due to 'improper public displays of affection'. Hmmm.

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“In a strange room, before you are emptied for sleep, what are you. And when you are filled with sleep you never were. I don’t know what I am. I don’t know if I am or not... how often have I lain beneath rain on a strange roof, thinking of home.”

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daria319
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Personally, I refuse to listen to these pop sensations floating around the radiowaves these days. However, I distinctly remember my parents' views on censoring music. I'm sure you're aware that Wal-Mart sells only censored CDs -- that is, music with certain words bleeped-out, cut out, or replaced, or songs partially rewritten. I am very grateful to my parents for not buying my music at such places. Both told me "I don't want you listening to any of this censored crap. If you want censored music, turn on the radio. It's disrespectful for an artist to have his or her work edited like this, and I want you to hear every single word that's SUPPOSED to be in a song, and THEN decide if you like it. I don't care if there is profanity. As long as you live here, your music isn't going to be f**ked with."

I love both of them for that, and I wish more parents would take that viewpoint.

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"You owe me two lifetimes and a pair of perfect blue eyes."

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