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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Sexual Ethics and Politics » Should pharmacists be able to refuse to fill your birth control prescription?

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Author Topic: Should pharmacists be able to refuse to fill your birth control prescription?
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

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...or your emergency contraception pill prescription? Or to refuse to sell you condoms, just because they don't personally like the idea of them?

Erin tossed me this this morning. Scary stuff, folks.

The Kansas House considers allowing pharmacists and physicians to refuse procedures they find morally objectionable.

"The bill specifically mentions "abortion, artificial insemination, assisted reproduction, artificial birth control, cloning, human stem cell and fetal experimentation, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia."


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Heather Corinna
Editor and Founder, Scarleteen

"If you're a bird, be an early early bird --
But if you're a worm, sleep late." - Shel Silverstein

[This message has been edited by Miz Scarlet (edited 03-08-2001).]


Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rizzo
Activist
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Yikes, that is scary.

Just wondering... if doctors already have the right to refuse to give you a perscription, then what's the point? Are these pharmacists more knowledgeable about their customers/patients than doctors are? Personally, I can say my pharmacist knows nothing about me and my doctor would be in a much better position to make judgements...

It seems like "moral objections" are something these pharmacists should have considered before choosing their career. Do they find it morally objectionable to sell addictive painkillers and tranquillizers too?


Posts: 582 | From: Montreal, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lin
Activist
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Defnitely very scary stuff.

It's amazing. The power a pharmacist can have over your life.

I'm kinda at a loss of words. What kind of person thinks up such bills? Geez.


Posts: 2294 | From: Singapore | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

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Someone from Kansas.
Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
emsily0
Activist
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key, buffchick is from kansas! not all kansasians are stupid.

a choice tidbit from that article: "morning-after abortion pill."...does that even exist? i think not.

whatever, if pharmacists don't want to fill prescriptions, they should find a different job. that is ridiculous. isn't part of the job of a pharmacist not to judge people for the medicines they need?

what if a 7th Day Adventist (i think that's the religion where people refuse medical care - it might be Jehova's Witnesses though) decided to be my pharmacist? what if he/she thought i didn't really need my penicillin because g-d would cure me? would that be legal?

blah.

em

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Once in awhile you get shown the light
in the strangest of places if you look at it right.

-The Grateful Dead


Posts: 786 | From: Washington, DC | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Bobolink
Activist
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I remember my mother telling me of her search in 1940's Quebec for a non Roman Catholic pharmacist who would sell her a diaphram. At that time, it was a mortal sin for a Catholic pharmacist to sell any contraceptive device. And the priests checked up.

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"A free society is a place where it's safe to be unpopular."

- Adlai Stevenson


Posts: 3442 | From: Stirling, Ontario, Canada | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
alaska
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 1896

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IMHO, pharmacists shouldn't have a right to refuse filling a prescription for perfectly legal drugs.

And someone calling emergency contraception an "abortion" obviously has no idea about what that actually is.

Scary. Scary. Scary.

What's the majority in the Kansas House of Representatives? May I deliver a guess here.....?? Urgh.

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"I am capable of, but sometimes not interested in making myself happy."


Posts: 4526 | From: germany | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

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Tisn't good, especially with our current administration.

I just want to take another moment to nearly beg young folks in the United States who have never been politically active to really consider starting to become so.

I am earnestly scared as to what the next few years will bring, and there seems to be a real disparity in what generations are earnestly active on many levels (esp. w/reproductive rights), and I see A LOT that as of right now, the level of grassroots action seems to have almost come to a grinding halt with my generation, who was only so active to begin with, and far less so than my parents generation.

So, please folks, act up -- get involved. An adult telling younger folks to 'act up" as it is says a lot. Even what seems like a really small thing to do -- sending a letter to your congressman, circulating a petition, volunteering one day a month for a progressive organization -- can make a really big difference.

Here's an easy and great place to start online: http://www.workingforchange.com/activism/current_actions.cfm

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Heather Corinna
Editor and Founder, Scarleteen

"If you're a bird, be an early early bird --
But if you're a worm, sleep late." - Shel Silverstein


Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

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And another resource for volunteer opportunities:
http://www.workingforchange.com/volunteer/index.cfm

Or this one: http://www.idealist.org


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unhappykoger
Activist
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in my opinion it is none of the pharmacists business. it is a persons personal choice if they want to take birth control not the pharmacist. or anyone elses for that matter.

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frozendream1026@aol.com

http://www.angelfire.com/oh2/koger


Posts: 365 | From: dayton,ohio,u.s.a. | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CallMeBuffChick
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Leave it to Kansas to think of something like that. There are some weird people in the Kansas House these days. Not eveyone can make it to the Planned Parenthood since there's only one here in Wichita. And there's not to many bright people there either. I pitty myself for living here.

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To be a princess is to be an actress, but not necessarily a good one.


Posts: 433 | From: Wichita, Ks | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Gumdrop Girl
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 568

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whoo, I'd hate to see them start refusing protease treatments and pill-cocktails to AIDS patients (because as we all know, AIDS is a gay disease )

anyway, the doctor makes the prescription, the pharmacist fills it. that should be the end of the bleedin' story!!!

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Kill your TV! And while you're at it, your mobile phone, too.

[This message has been edited by Gumdrop Girl (edited 03-08-2001).]


Posts: 12677 | From: Los Angeles, CA ... somewhere off the 10 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Eclipse
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I wish there was a way to make sure that everyone's personal/moral needs were met... maybe allow religious or discriminatative pharmicists in an area *after* that area had pharmacists available who had to sell everything. Problem is, you just can't legislate stuff like that... it becomes a slippery slope. I know some wonderful, talented people in the medical field who aren't comfortable with certain things (but also don't dictate what other people do with their lives!), and I just wish there was a way that they could put their talents to good use, perhaps catering to people with similar moral perspectives as they have... but ONLY AFTER EVERYONE'S NEEDS ARE MET. Including my need for condoms, and others' needs for abortion-related pharmacuticals, euthanasia related pharmaceuticals, etc.

I guess I just want to please everyone. I guess I'm thinking along the lines of, if I happened to want to sell people food, I'd be able to work at an organic grocery, since I wouldn't be comfortable selling pesticide laden, genetically engineered, etc, etc foods. And most people can keep shopping at Publix, and I can work where I'm comfortable and cater to people who see things the way I do. And I want pharmicists to have that option...they've already had SO very much power taken away from them and how they run their businesses... but, not at the expense of people who need pharmaceuticals! (I just know I'm spelling that wrong...)

Thank you for the webpages, Miz S. Mmmmm... activism...

Mmmm.. Strauss & Howe's generational theory (laid out in "Generations" and "The Fourth Turning") predicts the current conservative swing, and also that our generation will be active, but in a very different way than the last prophet generation (yeah, the ones that came of age in the 60s) did. If you believe them, we're headed for a crisis, then hopefully its resolution and a new era of pretty conformity (like the 50s) and then a new spiritual revolution, etc. Some of what they say sounds a little flakey, but I think the have a-piece-of-the-puzzle.

More concretely, I wish social activism was "taught" in schools. One of the big objections to homeschooling is that 'schools are America's great democratic institution,' public education is necessary for democracy, it's totally un-American to turn your back on them. Etc. Personally, I think this is ridiculous. Kids have *very* few legal rights in school, how could they possibly learn to defend their rights when for 12 years, they *can't*?, kids of course can't vote... I don't see how any of us can be expected to take part in the poltical process. I think it's in some ways harder than learning to take charge of our sexualities. Yes, I positively think that social activism in the youth is discouraged, often subtly, sometimes not. Is this just my personal bias? What've your experiences been?

< / ramble >


Posts: 257 | From: Sarasota, FL | Registered: Jan 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
exit seraphim
Activist
Member # 2566

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has anyone seen cider house rules? The boy was taught how to perform abortions, even though he morally disagreed with them, but later on realized that it was for the best that someone trained in that area of gynecological/obstretics (sorry if spelled incorrectly) to perform them when necessary instead of a woman going to a butcher with a coat hanger.

i think it's the same way...if someone needs medication..their going to get them however...and i don't think a pharmacist has any right to say that they can't morally give someone medication. i see a pharmacist as a go-between amongst a doctor/patient. i don't think they should get involved.

-justine

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have i been wrong?
have i been wise?
to shut my eyes and play along?


Posts: 142 | From: H*Ton, NY | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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