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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » The Randoms » Career advice.

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Author Topic: Career advice.
kanelmus
Neophyte
Member # 32792

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Perhaps this is not the place, but I have a career path question:

I am currently a freshman English major in college. I have a lot of passion for my major and I want to become a publisher or an editor someday.

However, I am also passionately interested in sex and sexuality, and I would love to work in a adult boutique at some point, and perhaps progress to a career as a "sexpert."

Based on my own research, I have found next to nothing regarding this topic.

Do you have any tips, articles, books, links, et cetera, which you could refer to me?

Much appreciated.

Posts: 7 | From: Northwest United States | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cool87
Activist
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I'm not sure what you mean by ''sexpert'' kanelmus.

Weren't you talking more about about becoming a sexologist ? I think you'll get far more results with this term. [Smile]

[ 02-22-2007, 05:53 PM: Message edited by: cool87 ]

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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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It really depends on what area of sexuality you want to get into.

Since you're just starting school, one thing you can do is look into a dual major. For instance, depending on what programs your school offers, you could keep studying English or journalism, but then also study sexology or sexual health or sexual sociology, whatever area of sex your interests lie in.

Most sexuality columnists, if that's what you have in mind -- people who write sex columns for the Voice, for instance, or other alt-weeklies, don't have an educational background in sex: much of those columns is personal narrative, or social issues, anecdotes, etc.

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kanelmus
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Heh, I didn't use the term "sexpert" in my search, since that's technically not a word I suppose. However, I didn't try "sexologist" so I'll attempt that. Perhaps it will yield more than I have found so far.

Sadly, I go to a school dominated by engineers. I'm lucky that they even have an English department. They CERTAINLY do not offer a major as interesting as sexual sociology..

At this point I'm not interested in writing columns, but that may change as I become more confident in my abilities.

I was sort of looking for a job in a store catering to a sexual clientele, such as Babeland, Good Vibrations, or Lover's Package, et cetera, over the summer, to springboard a potential future in a career that follows a similar vein. I would be happy working for an online adult store as well, such as Blowfish. I'd love to some day even manage such a store, although I'm sure that would require some hefty business classes.

Ideally, I would like to find a job getting paid to test sex toys.. [Wink]

But mostly I'm just interested in the entire scope of potential careers, from selling sexual aids to delivering sex education.

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StrawberrySafeSex
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Hey kanelmus,

I have a similar situation with my schoolin' that might help...

I started my University studies in Fall of 2005, directly after graduating high school. For the longest time I didn't know exactly what I wanted to do, but the best thing I could come with was Education (becoming a high school teacher), and people told me how good of a teacher I'd make, summers off, all those perks. SO anyway I went directly into the education program at the University of Winnipeg, knowing already that I wasn't quite sure about it to begin with.

Like you, I had a major in English. I did also really enjoy my english courses that I took, and the fact that I ended up with the top grade, (the only A in the whole course) only furthered my confidence in the subject.

However, nearing the end of the academic year (in mid-April 2006) and after taking an introduction to Education course, it became fairly obvious that it wasn't for me.

I had thus decided to take a year off school and figure out what I wanted to do, but then literally at the last minute stumbled upon the Facutly of Human Ecology at the University of Manitoba.

After meeting with an advisor and figuring out it's what I wanted to do, I was enrolled and am now completing my second year in the program.

Basically, what it is is this: I am pursuing a major in Family Social Sciences with a particular focus on two areas of specialization: Child & Adolescent Development and Family Violence & Conflict Resolution.

What I hope (and know through talking to graduates of the program, advisors, and looking at past field placement organizations) is that at the end of it, (a 4 yr undergrad Bachelor program) I will possess the knowledge and skills to work in the field of sexuality education.

Specifically, I would like to work with adolescent mothers, counseling on sex education, unpanned pregnancy and birth control, etc.

HOWEVER--- I also know that my major encompases a HUGE range of areas I can work in as well. Within my two focus areas, for instance, I can do anything from being a school counsellor to working with abused women, to sexuality education, to early childhood education.

Also, within the major of Family Social Sciences, there are other focus areas or options you can choose from, such as:

Families, Housing, and Communities- (work at a policy level dealing with... well... just that lol!)
Family Resource Management (again more upperscale, policy making and perhaps as well working with group homes, disabilities, financial planning, etc)
Option in Aging (work in implementing policy for senior citizens, become an executive at care homes, etc)

and then of course there are the two I am doing, which relates more to sexuality education.

NOW, how this relates to you:

I am not sure exactly where in the "Northwest US" you are located, but I do know that there are Human Ecology programs at Universities all over North America.

I also know that in Canada, at I *believe* the University of Alberta, (but don't hold me to that as I have looked at several programs across Canada) the Human Ecology program there actually has an option in Sexuality, and has tons of awesome-looking courses all about it.

So, all-in-all, I would recomend you Google it!
Cause honestly, I found out about mine online lol!

Also-- within the first two weeks of starting Human Ecology, I realized that it was just everything I had ever been interested in, so it's really working out well for me. Also, I've been getting better grades than I have ever gotten (GPA of 4.0 last semester, all A's!!)

THEREFORE, I think for me it was important in figuring out what just interested me for the sake of interest, (in my case, English-- which I still love and plan to take more courses in summer for electives) and what interested me for pursuing in a career.

Also, as Heather said, perhaps a double major is something you could look into. Also just to add to that comment, a lot of Universities actually require a Major as well as a Minor for graduation, so you could pursue the one that you decide you want to do for your career as a Major, and the other as a Minor.

In conclusion, after much long typing and an almost letter which I did not really intend to write (if that makes sense, lol!) I hope that this has helped somewhat to figure out what you want to do.

OH AND I ALMOST FORGOT-- I am just now starting training for a volunteer position of Reproductive Health Counsellor at a teen clinic. It is basically everything I want to do in my career as it stands right now, anyway, only I don't get paid for it (lol!).

So it would also be totally advisable to look into clinics around your area, because chances are there will be some volunteer opportunities just waiting for ya!

Plus, when you volunteer in that area you might also really learn if it's something you want to pursue further!

Good luck and keep me posted!!

Strawberry

[ 02-26-2007, 11:58 AM: Message edited by: StrawberrySafeSex ]

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"Sex can look like love if you don't know what love looks like. It is trying out trusting & being trusted... 'I can give it to you, and I can take it away. This sex is me', you can say. 'It is mine, take it. Take me. Please keep me.'"

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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

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What a FANTASTIC major/focus, Strawberry! Kudos to you!

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About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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Gumdrop Girl
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 568

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Just wanted to represent here: PUBLIC HEALTH!

You can do a lot in sexual health with a public health degree. There's community/social health, health education/promotion, and in my case, I work in epidemiology. Public health lets you focus on the health care aspects of sexuality, like women's health, STDs (my fave focus) and so forth.

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Toll free STD and clinic information, and condoms sent to your door for Los Angeles County residents.
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StrawberrySafeSex
Activist
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Aww thanks for your kind words, Heather! (I don't think I've ever gotten a kudos before--- an odd stare or two in confusion or a slight nod pretending to understand what I was talking about, maybe, but...) Yes, it's abosolutely fabulously fitting for me... pretty much every sentence I learn I find devastatingly intersting and also completely important/relevant (welcome to Geekville, population: me)!

Also, Gumdrop Girl, excellent point with the health education/promotion, you just reminded me that my faculty of Human Ecology is starting two new majors next academic year, one called Health Studies and I think the other is Health Science.

Some people put down the education system as it is right now (and the orientation of careers as well), from the move of "jack/jane of all trades, master of none" in pre-industrail eras to experts/specialists in post-indsutrial societies.

I personally think, though, and is clearly evidenced by your post, Gumdrop, that you can still attain specialization and build (at least to some degree) a framework of broader or more macro topics as well, providing you with just enough for personal knowledge, or glimpses into important areas that could be relevant to one's career.

Anyway, that's my 2 sociological cents for the evening!

Strawberry

[ 02-27-2007, 12:50 AM: Message edited by: StrawberrySafeSex ]

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"Sex can look like love if you don't know what love looks like. It is trying out trusting & being trusted... 'I can give it to you, and I can take it away. This sex is me', you can say. 'It is mine, take it. Take me. Please keep me.'"

Posts: 59 | From: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
KittenGoddess
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Health Communication might be another avenue to explore. It's somewhat like Public Health (we've got many public health students in our classes and we sometimes take some of their classes), but the focus is more on the communication aspect. If you're into journalism and the like, you might want to explore a health comm program.

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Sarah Liz

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Gumdrop Girl
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 568

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Ooh! How did I forget about health communication?

That was one of the majors offered in my public health program. I went to USC, and because it's LA, they have a very strong media and communications program. The folks in health comm did interships with organizations like Hollywood and Health (which consults with TV writers and producers to incorporate health messages into shows). Yeah, STDs were a big focus with the teen-oriented shows.

--------------------
LA County STD Hotline 1.800.758.0880
Toll free STD and clinic information, and condoms sent to your door for Los Angeles County residents.
1 in 3 sexually active people will be exposed to a STD by the time they turn 24.

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