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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » The Randoms » Anniversary 9/11

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Author Topic: Anniversary 9/11
tigress
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As you all should know, it's been almost a year since the September 11th attacks. I decided to make this thread because today in school we were talking about where we were and what we were doing when it happened. Just remembering all the innocent people who lost their lives and the heroisim of the ones in the planes with the terrorists. I can't believe it's been a year already, but I can still remember everything that happened that day. And all the sadness in days afterwards. I'm still praying for all of us.

Anyone else have anything to say?


Posts: 119 | From: SoRoa | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BruinDan
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There really isn't much one can say that hasn't been said already. I suppose that tends to be the case for all events of great historical significance.

A while after the attack, I asked my father how September 11 compared to other big days in his lifetime. He was 9 during the Cuban Missile Crisis and 10 when John F. Kennedy was assassinated. He remembers both as having a big impact on him, but told me that last September just blew everything else out of the water.

Last night I looked back into my little journal from that date, and one thing I wrote was a reminder to myself to memorize the date. How I felt, what I saw, what people around me felt and saw. The shock, the anger, the sadness, the emptiness, the days after when people sought any return to normal... Our children will be tested about that date in their 10th grade history classes, I wrote to myself...and I think that will prove to be the case.

I heard someone smarter than me say that this is the first year in memory that has been marked from September to September. In a lot of ways, I think that makes sense. I remember September 11 a whole heck of a lot more vividly than I remember January 1, and I think it will be a very long while before that image fades from our collective memory.

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"Task Force 46, Light Force 34, Engine and Rescue 66, Battalion 3, Division 2; respond into the Greater Alarm Structure Fire at San Pedro and Jefferson. Reported to be a fire at the First Alert fire extinguisher factory..."

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Olive
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I remember my mom waking me up in the morning and saying "A plane ran into the World Trade Center." She turned on my t.v. to prove it. In my head it was like...what's the world trade center? who ran planes into it? Yes, I year ago I didn't know to much of other places and big important buildings. I was actually thinking of it a few days ago. So many people died, and I remembered the guy who took the plane over and ran it into the ground istead of more people and buildings. He was sure brave, all these people who died for us(the U.S.) theyr'e heroes. Love not war!
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Gumdrop Girl
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Yeah, I remember getting a frantic phone call from BruinDan...

The September 11 attacks were very poorly handled where I live. I still seethe with anger when I think about the "candlelight vigil" they held that night. It was nothing more than an anti-American, anti-capitalist rantfest that showed no respect for those who were killed and missing in the attack. They dared to say that the "capitalist pigs" (stockbrokers, financiers, and the like) in the Towers got what was coming to them. It was disgusting, and many of the more sensible folks left early. I only stayed for a few minutes because it was more than evident that there was no mourning for the dead.

Today, i got this email, the important contents of which are as follows:

quote:
The California Patriot, [BCR's] sister organization, have people from the
Chancellor?s and ASUC?s office on tape during an interview today saying that
The Star Spangled Banner is divisive, and that red white and blue ribbons that
were planned to be passed out will be replaced with white ribbons- because red
white and blue is offensive.


Since when was the same flag that flies over the Chancellor's building considered to be offensive? you'd just have to be one of the nutcases who lives here to understand.

I'm gonna chance my clothes and go protest tonight. I'll tell ya about it when i get back.

------------------
"I am so smart, I am so smart, s-m-r-t....I mean s-m-A-r-t." Homer J. Simpson
"Mmm ... floor pie!" Homer J. Simpson


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Zanney
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It was an unforgettable day, no doubt about that. It was actually my birthday, so I wasn't at school that day, and I spent most of it in front of the TV, watching each new terrible detail unfold.

I was sickened by the site of some Arab communities dancing in the streets and celebrating. I know they feel repressed and have their own reasons, but we're talking thousands of violent deaths, and tens of thousands more being affected by such an event, and regardless of your own circumstances, I can't see how that is something to celebrate.

This year will be my 18th birthday, but at my party we're going to have a minute's silence for everyone who suffered in the attacks.

My parents met and married in New York, so my father knows 2 people who were involved. One we still don't know what has happened to. It sickens me what his last moments must have been like.


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Gumdrop Girl
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Umm yeah, I just got back from the student governemt meeting. Never been to one before, but it confirmed my worst fears: they're just a ubnch of resume-padding, pedantic politicos. It's been a while since my time has been wasted so vainly. They're bloated, wasteful and they haven't got the foggiest clue what a pretty sizable portion of the student body wants.

In short, they vetoed red, white and blue ribbons, but they spent 2 hours arguing about it.

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"I am so smart, I am so smart, s-m-r-t....I mean s-m-A-r-t." Homer J. Simpson
"Mmm ... floor pie!" Homer J. Simpson


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AlwaysWorried
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To be honest, I didn't believe what they were saying on the tv when they told us about it, I had just nipped home from college at dinner when it happened and I came down the stairs shouting something across the house to Mum and she was like,
"Shut up and watch this."

Not specifically related to this, but when anything big happens, the last things I remember besides Sept 11 being the two girls being kidnapped and the death of Diana (I live in England obviously), I think the tv stations handle it really badly. They get rid of most of the programs for the next few weeks for constant news, which I wouldn't mind except that they never have any new news and just show you exactly the same thing over and over and don't even change the show scripts. By the end of the week I could tell you exactly what the presenters were about to say. After a couple of weeks of this you start thinking "shut up and get over it." which I think is really bad, but it's how they make you think.


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alohamora
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What I remember is that I got a call from relatives overseas that something had happened, and in a daze, I turned on the tv and watched.

For a while, it was easy to get sucked into the horror of it, but I hate being a passive television viewer so I picked up a pen and some paper and started noting down what words were used, and what our top officials immediate reactions were.

It didn't make me feel any better, but on the anniversary, maybe we'll have a chance to reflect on our reactions, both private and public.

-----------------------

S: Let's discuss patriotism. Do you believe an individual should die for his country?

F: I believe he should <i>live</i> for his country.

—Harlan Ellison, Flintlock



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Dzuunmod
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Like many people, I feel so many different things about all of this. I don't know where to start.

Yes, it's a terrible tragedy, but on this continent, I feel that the whole thing only furthered the NY-DC-LA-as-centre-of-the-universe attitude that was already there before. Listening to American radio, or watching American television, I hear so many voices calling the attacks "the greatest tragedy of our time" and the like. Well, that's just not the plain truth. Fact is, there's no plain truth about what the greatest tragedy of our time is. The American media, over the past year, has looked suspiciously like propaganda to this outsider. (As one example, on all the American networks, you hear references to "the war on terror", while on the BBC World Service, they call it "the American war on terror". Little things like that can creep into your subconscious over time.)

I'm also glad that I'm distanced from the clamp down on dissent that I've heard about in the States. I heard an interview with a man from a First Amendment (of the American Constitution) centre the other day, and he said that polls over the last year have suggested that Americans think that a free press is no longer as important as it once was. I think that in times like these, a free press is more important than ever. There's that old saying, of course, about truth being the first casualty of war...

Still, I have also experienced the same emotions that most everyone else in North America has, as well. I worry about terrorist attacks here. Maybe six months ago news of a plan to bomb the Montreal Metro came out. That was scary. I want the authorities to do whatever they can to prevent that.

I'm so torn.

------------------
"I can tell by the way you take your infusion, you've spent some time in a mental institution"
-Andrew Bird's Bowl of Fire, Etch-a-sketch


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starlight23
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I was sitting in my first period class, ethics at the time. we had a sub and so someone had gone to the library to type something up. they came back downstairs and almost casually told us a plane hit one of the twin towers. out sub turned on the tv we had in the room and we all just sat in silence as we watched the second plane hit.

According to my boyfriend who was in the next class over, shortly after it happened he heard two girls screaming, the kind of scream that haunts your nightmares. they were the daughters of the pilot of the first plane that crashed and campus ministry had taken them out of class to tell them what happened.

I remember the room being so silent. I've never heard 40 16 year olds be that quiet for that long. I didn't even know how to react, except to be very very scared of what was going to happen next. That period was extended slightly until the building had calmed down a little...but my next teacher tried to teach us. We bascially told her no, and that we couldnt' take the test the next day and went into the room across the hall and watched...my gym teacher made us go outside for class like always...it was so eerie....there were no planes in the sky. living within 20-30 miles of 2 airports...that's not something that happens. it was just silent, and there were barely any cars on the road. all the sports were canceld for the day and i went to a friends house, since none of our parents were home yet and none of us really wanted to be alone. we kept the tv off and tried not to think about it as much as possible.

I'm not sure it would have effected me as much if those two girls hadn't gone to my school. I attended the memorial service for the pilot along with LOTS of other people. i couldn't believe the amount of people there, it was incredible to see.

I think the things that got to me the most were the music that was played on the radio...i'm not sure if everyone in the US had stations that did this...but one station around here had songs such as hero by enrique and put sound clips into them as tributes...i cried the first few times i heard them. it was that stuff that gives you the goosebumps when you hear it.

9/11 is a day that will not be forgotten by anyone who was alive when it happened, ever. it was tragic, saddening, and a horrible thing that happened and i know that it's changed alot of the ways that i think.

and yea...that was quite long...i got on a roll. *shrug*

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*Live life to the fullest... think of all the people on the Titanic who passed up chocolate dessert.*

*Star*Light*


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Celtic Daisy
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Let me start off by saying where i was, etc. Like Olive, i was asleep when my mom burst in and said "sorry i didn't wake you up for school, i was watching the news, the pentagon is on fire and the world trade centers could collapse. In a half sleep daze that's a lot to take in. When i went to school i started telling people and they didn't believe me at first. A couple of people heard the trade centers were on fire but they didn't know it was terrorists.

I got my teacher to get a radio and we listened to it all class. In my film studies course we watched CNN with a bunch of classes. It was a horrible day.

I can't really say that it had any huge impact on me honestly. I realize it was a horrible thing, but it didn't affect me in much of a way and my life really hasn't changed because of it. That might sound horrible, but it's true. I was worried about the people at the time, but just as worried as i am about anyone in any kind of disaster. I have a lot of views on the whole "war on terrorism" thing, but i do'nt really want to get into that.

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'You've got the eyes of ten women. Not in a jar! I wasn't accusing you. I just mean your eyes are really nice'-coupling

Erin Jane
~Scarleteen Advocate~


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melimelo
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that morning, it was something like the first of the second day i was back from school after my grandma's funeral.

between 2 classes, a teacher came to one of my friends and said "the states are being bombed". ah. the bell rang, and we went to class.

i was going to gym. my teacher and a few other teachers were talking, and weren't paying any attention to me. when they started speaking about death, i said "yes, i know death is sad, my grandma died, this is why i was absent", and i showed the paper. (it was the first time i had teacher staring at me in such a way).

during other pauses and at lunch time, i heard the weirdest rumors about what had happened. one of them was that terrorists had invaded washington and made their way north up to Canada, and destroyed EVERYTHING on their way. yeah, sure you can do that in like 3-4 hours!

at lunch time, a friend said "Cat, you know the twin towers?" and i was like "hum... no, not sure" (for some reason, that name reminded me of japan) and she had to tell me what they were. on the other hand, i was one of the rare who had heard of the pentagon before.

my class after that was economy. my teacher had a little radio, and she was the first to tell us the truth, that they were planes. we had heard so many stupid things, that when she said it, we were like "oh, that's all?".

i wasn't very scared. i had the feeling nothing else would happen. the only thing i wanted was to sleep, and get news from my washingtonian friend. i came home, and watched the news.

later that night, i talked to my DC friend on internet. she asked me if we had had attacks in canada too. that made me somewhat "angry". was she saying that if buildings had fallen down here too, they wouldn't have known about it?

few days after that, i stopped watching the news. (it was something i was doing regularly before sept. 11). i was tired of hearing only about that.

i was also a bit "disappointed". i had interpreted the attacks as a message to the states saying something like "hey, listen, you're not the only ones on this planet and maybe you should open your eyes a little more about other countries". but all that seemed to change was "we're gonna show them we're stronger!" and eventually "we will fight back!"

maybe it wasn't as much disturbing for us because we are, in quebec, mainly francophones and pretty much no one has relatives/someone they know in the states ; i was a rare case with having a friend.


(edited to make it [a bit] shorter!)

[This message has been edited by misscat (edited 09-06-2002).]


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LilBlueSmurf
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I can't believe it's been a whole year, almost.

I was at school. I leave for school around 8 or 8:30am, so i was leaving just as it was all happening ... I didn't find out about it until a few hours later. Just before 2nd period let out (it was gr 13 Biology), there was an announcement that started off as "I'm sure you all know by now ..." Know what? What did i know? I was in class. I hadn't heard a single thing about the states and terrorism. He continued on to say that the US had been 'attacked' and both twin towers had collapsed and the pentagon was also hit.

I was in shock. I'm pretty sure the rest of my classmates were. The teacher said she would leave her door open and whoever wanted to could talk if they needed to ... This was just before lunch, so she really didn't have to do that. The guidance councelors were there all day, just talking people through it, rather than doing scheduling changes as they usually would be during the first few wks of school.

The very first thing i did was call my mom. I didn't have a quarter, and it wouldnt' matter if i had, as it's long distance anyway ... so i called collect. She was watching CNN and had seen the whole thing unfold from the beginning. We only talked for a few mins, as there was a huge lineup for the phones.

Later that afternoon, i was to babysit my little cousin. He's only 4, and therefore had no idea what was going on. I got in the car w/ my aunt and she was telling me what had happened and we were listening to the radio. We got to their house, and she immediately turned on CNN to see what was going on.

It wasn't real to me until then. I saw the buildings fall over and over again, and i saw people jumping out of the windows ... I heard of emerg. workers being trapped in the rubble. While i had felt terrible about it that morning, i can't even find a word to describe how i felt about it once i saw it on TV. Wanting and needing to escape it all for a bit, i started flipping through the channels to find something else on. Almost every single station was reporting on this. Those that weren't were running updates at the bottome of the screen. My only escape was watching Caillou movies w/ my cousin (and he was alseep, but i left them on b/c i couldn't face it anymore)

I went home that nite and fought w/ my bf for hours. I was really agitated about it all, and his viewpoint on it was completely different from mine. Even my dad felt different ... which made the next month difficult.

The next morning i went to school as normal. I had Sociology first thing, and my teacher had been a guidance councelor in the past, so all we did was talk about the past days events. I was completely disgusted at the opinoins of some of my classmates.

I lit a candle that nite, and the month anny, and will do so on the 11th. I remember on the month anny i walked to the store to buy a candle and cat food and i saw two houses w/ candles in their windows ... and it just brought this huge smile to my face. I no longer felt alone, like i was the only one who cared enough to light a freaking candle ... I hope more people will do it this year.


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PoetgirlNY
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I was at school, the second school day of the year, less than 2 miles away from WTC. When the first tower started to crumble, I heard what sounded like thunder, but it was a sunny day. A teacher came into my classroom and said that we should all go to meeting. The whole high school gathered, and our principal told us what had happened. We weren't allowed to leave without an adult (even though I was 17 at the time), and my parents were nowhere near me, so I had to go home with my friend and her mother, who lived only about 10 blocks from WTC. First, we went to my friend's mother's school, and helped to keep the 5 year olds calm and get them all safely to their parents. Then my friend and I had to walk downtown towards the disaster site, and we could hardly breathe because the dust in the air was so thick. We had to put our shirts over our mouths just to not choke. We went and got her dog out of her apartment, which was coated in a few inches of debris. Then I walked home across the Brooklyn Bridge. I could see this huge cloud of smoke over lower Manhattan. Total strangers kept coming up to me and talking to me about what was happening, everyone was so freaked out. When I got home, I called my best friend to let her know I was okay ( I knew she was at school in Brooklyn) and she told me that one of her close friends from school was doing an internship in one of the buildings that had collapsed, and hadn't heard from her yet. It was just a bad, bad day. I prayed (or whatever it is that I do) for peace before I went to bed.

This year, I'm a little worried that things will be somehow very very bad on the anniversary. I don't think there will be another terrorist attack, because it would be too obvious, but I'm worried about people here in the city hurting each other. I'll be at a candelight peace vigil.

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You were never no locomotive, Sunflower, you were a sunflower!
-Allen Ginsberg


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Beppie
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I've been thinking about the best way to mark the anniversary of the attacks. For some reason watching endless documentaries on TV doesn't seem appropriate to me, somehow. They've been going all week already, and when you get down to it, they are all in the same postion as Danny: "There really isn't much one can say that hasn't been said already."

I remember when the attacks occured, it was night-time here, and I was woken by my flatmates talking loudly. At first I was annoyed, but when I heard them talking about planes crashing into buildings, I thought I'd better see what was going on. Still, I hardly expected to hear that one of the Twin Towers had already fallen, and the pentagon was in flames.

I didn't go back to bed that night. I knew I wouldn't be able to sleep if I tried, and it seemed impossible that dawn would ever come. But of course it did, and now, nearly a year of dawns have come. However, almost everyone, it seems, continually feels the need to be brought back to the moments when the planes hit and the towers fell. Its like we constantly need to re-comprehend what happenned.

It's difficult for me, when I see something about September 11th, not to look at it. It almost feels like some sort of gluttony. (Keats used the phrase "glut thy sorrow"). It feels like all the documentaries, all the magazine articles and interviews, its all creating a lot of noise to block out whatever other reactions we might have beyonds sadness and for many people, anger.

So, I thought, what is the most appropriate way to mark the anniversary of the attacks? Perhaps, I thought, the best thing to do, is to NOT make myself a glutton on pain that day. That doesn't mean I won't remember it, or be sad about it. But it means I'll turn off the TV- I won't watch documentaries, or anything else. I won't go online, and I won't buy any newspapers. I've seen the planes hit and the towers fall, and the pentagon de-pentified hundreds of times now. It won't do anyone any good to see it again.

I've come up with a list of a few things that I think would be good to do on the day:

I will go to a vigil.
I will phone friends and family.
I will think about the people who died, and who have died as a result.
I will think about, how in perspective, it was a relatively small number of people, and about why it seems like a much huger thing than if those people had died in road accidents or from terminal illness.
I will wonder if its okay to see it as a much huger thing.
I will donate some money (even if its just a little) to a good cause.


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Gumdrop Girl
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quote:
i was also a bit "disappointed". i had interpreted the attacks as a message to the states saying something like "hey, listen, you're not the only ones on this planet and maybe you should open your eyes a little more about other countries". but all that seemed to change was "we're gonna show them we're stronger!" and eventually "we will fight back!"

And why not fight back? In 1941, that's what the Americans did when the Japanese ambushed Pearl Harbor -- after the States made it very clear that they would not be getting involved in WWII. You don't ignore a very loud call to war like that.

In this case, a group of people decided they didn't like the way the Western World lived. Okay, so if we're not the only people in the world, then why can't they find a better way of proving it than flying civilian passenger planes into large buildings? If they really wanted to prove their point, they would be better to do it by expanding human rights, being better traders, industrializing, commercializing, expanding their economic pull as to provide a better standard of living for their people. That would be the ulimate proof of their clout as a world power.

Stoning women who have been raped, burying gays under rubble and hording the weath from their oil cartels and then getting jealous of the United States for being more prosperous is ludicrous. They would be fools to think that the American wouldn't respond to a direct assault.

As for the REuters-style scare quotes, I forgot who said it, but it wasn't an "attack" -- that just questions its very identity. It was most distinctly an attack. Hell, they didn't even try to make it look like an accident.

And as for my school, the rallying worked. We'll be getting colored ribbons at the memorial.

------------------
"I am so smart, I am so smart, s-m-r-t....I mean s-m-A-r-t." Homer J. Simpson
"Mmm ... floor pie!" Homer J. Simpson


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Daydreamer24
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I am worried about this September 11th. I am really worried about this September 11th. I'm worried that something else is going to happen, even though it might be too obvious.

Besides the fact that I didn't know anyone involved with the attacks, 9/11 did have an impact on me and my feelings.

When I hear the song "Where Were You When the World Stopped Turning?" by Alan Jackson (which is a very, very good song) it hits me harder everytime and it makes me think because; we're living in a country that is very, very lucky, and we take every breath for granted. Why can't we get along and not honk at the guy who cuts in front of us on the highway? It all makes very little sense to me why people are so selfish. I am a changed person and am working everyday to be nicer.

I pray for everyone who lost someone on the day that the world stopped turning.

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God Bless Texas

"If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day, so I never have to live without you."
-- Winnie The Pooh


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Daydreamer24
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Where Were You
(Alan Jackson)

[This message has been edited by Miz Scarlet (edited 09-10-2002).]


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melimelo
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I'm just gonna summarize by saying i don't think there should be a war.

I'm editing this for reasons mentionned by BruinDan that i agree with.

My point was really not to start a political discussion. Well, not with my first message. The second i just wanted to reply, nothing more, and certainly not starting what could be/become a fight.

[This message has been edited by misscat (edited 09-08-2002).]


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BruinDan
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Frankly, misscat, I find that to be an overly simplistic view and I disagree wholeheartedly. But that's okay, because unlike the countries that the terrorists come from, we here in the Western World have freedom of speech and expression. And that means we can agree to disagree all we want.

While I'm sure we all have widely varying opinions on whether war is good or bad and what the most appropriate and just response should be to last year's attacks, I do not think that is appropriate fodder for conversation here. A year ago it was decided by the board staff that we would not engage ourselves into heated debates about the matter here, as it would accomplish little more than potentially alienating some of our beloved users. Please bear in mind that this thread is specifically geared towards one's memories of the attacks itself. Political statements, arguments, complaints, and what-ifs simply cannot be accepted here. I'd hate for us to have to close such an interesting thread, so let's try and keep it on-topic. Sound good?

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confused333
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If you are an AOL member, you can add a memorial candle and write something about the attacks. The address is:
http://memorial.web.aol.com/submit.adp

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Why does a rose represent love, when a rose always dies??

Friends are like condoms, they help out when things get hard.


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Dzuunmod
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Well, I suppose I'll chime in with my story.

I had a class that morning, as with every Tuesday morning, from 9:15 to 11:30. Everyone (about 20 journalism students) seemed to arrive at class with no idea of what was going on. The professor got there, and started talking about unemployment rates and such (it was a business journalism class - mandatory, as I wouldn't have been in it otherwise). He gave us an in-class assignment to do, and then brought us to a computer lab to type it up. What's interesting about the next hour and a half or so, is that not one of the students in the class snuck away from their assignment while we were in the lab, to check their email, or goof off on the internet. If they had, surely everyone in the class would've found out what was going on.

But we didn't. We just went about our little business, while our professor, a business writer for a local paper sat at the front of the room, marking things, and listening to his walkman. Listening to his walkman. For those of you in university, when have you ever known a professor to listen to a walkman in class? He obviously knew, but he didn't say a damn word to us. When people went up to ask questions about the assignment, he'd answer them calmly, and go back to his walkman.

So we all left class at 11:30, still, with no idea. I got on the bus, which took me to the metro. The cars on the metro have little display screens that show ads and give weather and headlines. Out of the corner of my eye on the way home, I saw something on the screen about the "crise a la Maison Blanche" ("crisis at the White House"), and in my mind, I immediately brushed it off as probably being about some policy dispute, or something. After all, the headlines on those screens are rarely less than two days old.

So, I get home at around 12:30 or so, and after a few minutes of doing nothing in particular, I get on the internet, and check on these very message boards. In this very forum, I see Miz Scarlet's thread about the National Crisis. National Crisis; crise a la Maison Blanche; walkman on the professor - it all added up in one split second for me. I bolted for the television, and turned it on to see bulletins flashing across the screen about planes crashing into buildings, and all the rest. Now, on television at that point, they were mostly just reading new developments as they came in, and they weren't really giving the big picture, so I ignored the messages on my phone and called a friend. While she explained everything to me (she was somewhat calm, as she'd been listening to the radio for about two or three hours, and there'd been time for it to sink in), I just kept saying the same three or four phrases over and over again. "Oh, wow. Oh my god. Oh, wow. This is incredible."

Hours later, when I thought back to class that morning, I was so mad, when I realized that my professor knew all along what was going on, but didn't tell us. When something like that is happening, you don't let us go on, writing our ridiculous little stories about unemployment rates - you pull a freaking television into the class, so that 20 journalism students can talk about what they're seeing!

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"Isn't it amazing what you can accomplish/when the little sensation gets in your way/no ambition whisperin' over your shoulder/oh, isn't it amazing you can do anything"
-The Tragically Hip, Fireworks


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Angel07
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i didnt find out until 3rd period. during 3rd we have lunch,then 30 more minutes of class. some of my friends at another table were talking but they wouldnt tell me what was going on. when we went to lunch one of them finally told me, said the words i will NEVER forget. "ok. the twin towers are gone." we didnt know much. back in class we all discussed it. we heard rumors that the terrorists were going to places with alot of schools and were in a city near us, etc. in 4th period, our teacher told us what she knew, and was on the internet.thats when i saw the picture of the towers with a huge ball of fire exploding out. i started crying and alot of people in my class were too. the rest of the evening i just called my friends and watched the news. it didnt even seem real. one of my cousins was killed, but i didnt know him. i still think about him though. i always wonder how bad it must have been to rather jump out then stay.it doesnt seem like its been a year. i went to see ground zero shortly after. there wasnt much too see, but when you remember what used to be there, its so sad. i had been at the WTC in august. thats just my story.
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WinterMoon
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I live in Australia, and so it was quite late at night on the 11th, when it happened. I was online, talking to a few friends.
In Australia at the time, a national airline, Ansett Australia, had just been declared insolvent, and I was extremely stressed about it, because the job my Dad had with said airline was our only source of income, and we were supposed to be selling our house on the 15th so we could move interstate with said job.
I was pouring my heart out about the airline collapse to my friend, and she goes to me "Don't worry, it's going to be okay. George Bush is going to make sure someone pays."
And I was like "Why would George Bush care about an Australian airline?"

Then another friend got online and goes "OMG, did you hear that a plane flew into the World Trade Centre in NYC?" and because I was in "airline worry" mode, my first thought was "What sort of pilot would fly a plane that low?"
Then I went and put CNN on, and saw, live on my television screen, the second plane hit the building. I got offline, and my friend rang up, and we talked about it a bit. I couldn't really relate, as I was in a personal crisis at the time, a crisis I had been dealing with and watching escalate for three or four days.

I stayed up most of the night watching the coverage on CNN and Channel 10. I vividly remember the news anchorwoman on Channel 10. She was flustered and edgy, and was having a great deal of trouble speaking and constructing sentences.

Early on the morning of the 12th, I went to bed, and got up for school a few hours later. The first thing I did was turn on the TV to see if anything else had happened while I was asleep, and to see if I could catch any breaking news about Ansett Australia.
It was pretty much all NYC/Pentagon stuff, all other news had been pushed aside. My sister and I got ready for school, and Dad went to his job at the airline. The whole way to school on the bus the lady on the radio was going "Hug your kids. Tell them you love them" and I wanted to stab her in the head, cause she was annoying me. The strangest thought struck me that morning as well. I thought "One day, someone is going to make a film about this"

Anyway, I got to school, and went into the year 12 commonroom, where all my friends were crowded around the TV screen. I had bought the morning paper, and was sprawled on the floor looking for articles on my personal crisis, and trying to deal with that.
In my first period Design class, we were all sitting around looking glum, when the door burst open and one of the more hyperactive members of my class bounded into the room "You'll never guess what happened this morning!!" she said.
We've all gone "Yeah, Bel, we heard." and she was like "Oh." I guess she thought she had an exclusive. That lightened the mood a bit. I hung out with my younger sister and cousin most of the day (we all went to the same school). They were 14 at the time, and couldn't really understand or grasp what had happened, and we kind of sat and felt numb together.

It was an absolute tragedy. I couldn't relate to what had happened until about Friday, when I was at a rally with my Dad regarding his job and entitlements, and I was thinking about my last flight with Ansett Australia in July last year. I'd sat next to a woman from New York City and her toddler son. That's when it became real for me.
Sorry about all the Ansett Australia references. It's just that when I think about September 11, Ansett comes to mind, and the two are kind of related anyway. Our Prime Minister was in Washington with George Bush at the time, and in the days leading up to the attacks, Ansett employees were angry with Howard for not being in Australia to try and solve a national crisis.
The evening of the 12th, my Dad and I made some half-hearted jokes that the planes were piloted by angry Ansett staff who wanted to drive Howard out of the USA and back to Aus to deal with what was happening here. I guess making bad jokes is a coping mechanism, I don't know.
I do remember being angry that the Ansett Crisis had been superseded by another news story. In my mind, nothing was more important than the loss of 17,000 Australian jobs, and a national icon that had existed since the 1930's.
I guess I was just confused and disoriented, more than anything. My uncle used to work for Merril Lynch, in the WTC...though he'd been back in Australia since August, thankfully.
God that was an awful, awful week.

[This message has been edited by WinterMoon (edited 09-08-2002).]


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Heather
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A couple reminders here.

It is always, always okay at Scarleteen, in a discussion like this, for a poster to state how they feel about something. It cannot be okay to state one personal opinion or set of feelings and not another. And that inequity would be far more nonproductive.

Last year, we rteigned that in a bit because in the midst of an international trauma, it seemed best. But people have got to discuss these things eventually, and I'm of the mind that putting a lid on it forever would be a very bad idea.

So, discuss as you will, and participate if you can. Sometimes, we're not able to speak to our feelings or discuss topics that hurt too badly, where we can't have any objectivity, or that we don't understand or just can't deal with. Recognize your own limits: if participating in a discussion like this via reading or posting is more than you can handle, step away until it's a good time for you. If you know you can't talk about it and see opinions other than yours without reacting poorly, without courtesy and fairness, do not participate.

But either everyone is allowed to share their feelings or no one is, not just some people or some opinions. So, at this point understand that no one here should feel they cannot say how they feel. That isn't fair and it isn't in the spirit of this place.

Just again: know your own limits and do what is best for you, and please post with respect for others.

(Daydreamer, I had to edit your post with the lyrics, because reprinting whole lyrics without permission is a copyright violation. perhaps you could add a link to where they are posted originally instead.)

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Heather Corinna
Editor and Founder, Scarleteen

My epitaph should read: "She worked herself into this ground."
-- Kay Bailey Hutchinson


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Daydreamer24
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Eeep! Sorry bout that.
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Gumdrop Girl
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Hey folks, I was just thinking tomorrow might be a great time to go give blood or donate to a properly-organized charity.

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"I am so smart, I am so smart, s-m-r-t....I mean s-m-A-r-t." Homer J. Simpson
"Mmm ... floor pie!" Homer J. Simpson


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witch_baby
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I couldn't help being frusterated today. I wanted to be able to do my rememberances in my own way, bet everywhere I turned it seemed people were using a tragedy to further their own means. Student Council was trying to get more support by being all "patriotic", I was chastised by a TEACHER for disagreeing w/ her use of "God Bless America" (I'm buddhist), kids went around trying to have the flashiest red, white, and blue clothes, radio hosts promoted their shows while offering their condolences, and corner stores overpriced their nylon flags. It makes me sad that this is all the learnign that we seem to have gotten from a terrible experience.

Someone even had the verve to ask me where my patriotism was, because I wasn't wearing my flag's colors.

My patriotism is in the way I act. I appreciate the freedome given to me for living here. I use my freedom of speech to try and help others. I try and help my fellow humans live their lives the best way they can.

Somehow that seems more patriotic than meaningless symbols, racial profiling against middle easterners, forcing one's religion upon others, and furthering one's own gains.

May everyone carry a bit of wisdom away from their sorrow.

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Once upon an time...?
What time are we upon and where do I belong?


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Whatsthatmommy
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At first i heard that a plane had hit the twin cities then i heard one hit camp david so then i tuned to the news and i found out. Since i live on the east coast it was more of a shock for me than for the people in the west.

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"I believe everyody in the world should have guns. Citizens should have bazookas and rocket launchers too. I believe that all citizens should have their weapons of choice. However, I also believe that only I should have the ammunition. Because frankly, I wouldn't trust the rest of the goobers with anything more dangerous than string."
-Scott Adams


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CutiePie4eva
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i wrote a poem about it for english. she assigned it, we talked about our feelings and what we wrote in class. it got a little emotional, i felt like i was going to cry. a lot of the people in my class knew people who had died in the plane crash in the WTC buildings...

one friend told a heartbreaking story about how loosing her uncle cuases her to loose her cousin cuase her cousin and her barely talked after that and stuff... and they had been best friends...

anywat... heres my poem... i dont think my poems are all too great, but oh well... =)

The Effect

The wounds are not fully healed,
The people still weep,
The ground is still barren.

Yet...
The flag waves brighter,
The people seem stronger,
The voices are louder.

We are bound together
In the terrible truth
That anyone can forever change our lives.

We must trust each other,
We must work together,
We must hope for one another.

In times of need...
We are there for each other,
We help; we love,
We stand strong.

[This message has been edited by CutiePie4eva (edited 09-13-2002).]


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