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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » The Randoms » College problems, UGH

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Author Topic: College problems, UGH
StarryRedhead
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Alright, I am sitting here trying to write an English essay on cloning. We had to read two long essays on two different opinions and now we're supposed to quote these people, find their differences in opinions, then find where their opinions are similar, quote them, use paraphrasing and summarizing. Yuck. Then this Friday I have a psychology test, no clue what's going on there even though I look through and study my notes everynight. Double yuck. This is my second year of college, last year I only passed my music and acting classes. I know I have a learning disability, I have trouble understanding directions and concepts or something like that, and I get extra help but I always feel lost when it comes to school.

I am beginning to feel like maybe College isn't for me. I am gonna struggle through this year, I HAVE to pass everything to keep financial aid, but after this I'm thinking of taking a break or something because it just gets me so frustruated and depressed because I never understand what's going on even though I try so hard! I am beginning to wonder if maybe working full time would be better. This summer I had a job at an office, made about $250 a week and I felt so fulfilled and useful. I don't know, I'm just venting and miserable.......back to my English essay. ::::sigh::::

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}{*Starry Ali*}{

"It's a narrow margin, just room enough for regret, in the inch and a half between, "Hey, how ya been?" and "Can I kiss you yet?"

~Alisons Life~


Posts: 367 | From: NY, USA | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lemming
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I can certainly empathize with you on at least part of that. It's been less than a month, and I already feel burned-out.

I, too, am wondering if I wouldn't feel better and be more useful just working and staying out of school for a bit, but my parents have made it clear that if I do that they won't help pay for my school at all, when I go back.

As for psychology - I'm a psych major, and it's about the only subject that I'm consistently good at. If you have any questions, give a holler here and make the subject "Lemming", and I'll be GLAD to help you out!

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~lemming, Scarleteen Advocate

want to know the inner lemming? read her diary at http://innerlemming.diaryland.com/ .


Posts: 3156 | From: Austin, Texas | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Gumdrop Girl
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i gotta say, in the long run, college is going to help you a *lot* so hang in there.

To help with your GPA, there's two things you should consider. You might want to cut back on your workload so you can concentrate on the things that are important for your major. Or you might want to take fewer core classes and pad your schedule with some easier classes.

And please take advantage of all the tutoring they offer! Don't be afraid of tutoring -- don't think "if I go to the tutors, they'll think I'm dumb" it's not that way at all! Go to your instructor's office hours for outside help. Get him/her to check out your paper drafts so you know what to do.

Or get help from your fellow classmates. Or people who have taken the class before. I like to help people with organic chem and bio stuff.

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if you get the molasses, i'll set up the trampoline.


Posts: 12677 | From: Los Angeles, CA ... somewhere off the 10 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Hanne
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These folks are right -- tutoring and help centers can make a big difference. Also, if you have a documented learning disability, your campus should have policies for helping you deal with that, and should be prepared to help you get support services to help you succeed academically regardless of your learning disability. I've been an instructor or professor on many different college campuses, and have yet to find one that does not have services to help disabled (including learning disabled) students.

If you don't know where to turn for that kind of help, call the Dean of Students' office, or the Undergraduate Dean's office. They will be able to tell you where to go and whom you need to contact.

Ultimately, though, college is not the be-all and end-all. It is possible to get through life just fine without a college degree, or to go back and do college later on, or at a different pace. I've known students who've done very well by taking college one or two courses at a time, and working full-time. SOme folks do better in a community college situation than they do at a full-time high-pressure collegiate environment. Some people just aren't ready to be in college when they're there.

I'd say that you should definitely do your best to investigate the possibilities for tutoring, support, and assistance you have at your school first, before you decide to leave. However, if you do decide that college isn't for you right now, that can be an okay choice too. Not everyone needs to go through the educational system on the same schedule.

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Hanne Blank
Co-Editor, Scarleteen

Start a Revolution -- Stop Hating Your Body!


Posts: 1538 | From: boston, ma, USA | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dzuunmod
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I'd agree with Gumdrop Girl on this one. I hate dragging my butt out of bed for my early morning classes, but it's gotta be done, right?
I also want to say that I have SO much respect for people who are putting themselves through college in the U.S. Up here, I hear so many rumours about the cost of post-secondary schooling in the States, and it sounds so, so scary. How do you all do it? How much is tuition at most schools down there?

Posts: 1515 | From: Montreal, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ErinK
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As one o' them horrible English teacher types, let me also put in a plug for the Writing Center or Writing Lab at your school. The tutors in a writing center can help you with writing for any class at any stage, including explaining assignments or strategies for doing parts of assignments.

My school's writing lab has an online component which includes a website and an email address where people from anywhere can send questions. It's at http://owl.english.purdue.edu

And I agree with what the other posters have said about getting help while you are in school and about school not being for everyone. There are plenty of ways to get an education and there are plenty of ways to support yourself. Do what is best for you.

Erin

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PHILOSOPHY: Basically, this involves sitting in a room and deciding there
is no such thing as reality and then going to lunch. -- Dave Barry


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StarryRedhead
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Thanks for all the advcie guys! The good news is I FINALLY finished my English essay! I do get a lot of tutoring when I have time. Right now I go from school, right to work, so it's hard to find time to get the help I need but there are always ways to get it. I have decided to struggle through this since I know once it's over I will be SO glad I dealt with it. College IS pretty important. I only go to a community college but it's probably all I could handle.

I know for a fact I'm not gonna do years of this. It's just not for me. I am planning on going to a 1 year masseuse school next year since that's what I REALLY want to do. I would just feel much better working and learning a skill and then getting out there and doing it. But for now, struggle I must. And Lemming, glad to know you are there when I need!

Thanks for all the support and advice, I was having a mental break down then and definitely needed it! You all rock!

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}{*Starry Ali*}{

"It's a narrow margin, just room enough for regret, in the inch and a half between, "Hey, how ya been?" and "Can I kiss you yet?"

~Alisons Life~


Posts: 367 | From: NY, USA | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Gumdrop Girl
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Dzuunmod: Public universities are generally cheaper than private universities. Public universities are also cheaper for in-state residents.

I an a California resident going to a U of California school. The tuitions at each UC school varies by location (Berkeley being the most expensive), but for residents, it's about $4000 per year (not including room and board or books). Out of state students pay about $25000 per year for tuition. Contrast with Stanford's tuition, which is $25000 for all students.

most of my expenses are rent, though. it's a nightmare here. Four months of my rent is one year of tuition -- you do the math :P

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if you get the molasses, i'll set up the trampoline.


Posts: 12677 | From: Los Angeles, CA ... somewhere off the 10 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ThisGuy
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That's frightening.

When I started uni here (before they started whole-sale butchering the system), it cost roughly $AU2200 a year for any degree, at any university. Government subsidised, and a flat rate based on your subject loading.

Effectively, I have a first class engineering degree with an accrued government debt of about $US6000 for four years.

The American education system frankly sickens me.

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Sufficiently advanced stupidity is indistinguishable from malice
Crazy like a shoehorn, bay-be!


Posts: 915 | From: Australia | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dzuunmod
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Thanks Gumdrop Girl, I've one other question: How are public degrees viewed, versus private degrees? There aren't any full-fledged private universities up here. I do know that in Mexico, for instance (and I totally recognize that the U.S. isn't Mexico) degrees from public universities are virtually worthless. So, in the U.S. would an employer pick a private degree over a public one, if everything else was equal?
I know what you mean, ThisGuy. The whole thing scares me. I'm going to an out-of-province school, and I pay about $1300-$1400 US per semester.

Posts: 1515 | From: Montreal, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Hanne
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Generally, the reputation goes school-by-school, not so much a private versus public thing. Some public universities, like University of California at Berkeley, Indiana University, and University of Washington have excellent reputations, while other public universities do not. Private schools are very similar that way, some are known as being quite good, others are lesser-known.

Ironically, the REPUTATION of a school may not have much to do with the quality of instruction. I've been a student at ivy league universities, at state schools, at private schools, and at community colleges... and have found both excellent and godawful instruction in every single one. That, of course, is because the quality of instruction depends primarily on the individuals who teach, and very little on the school itself.

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Hanne Blank
Co-Editor, Scarleteen

Start a Revolution -- Stop Hating Your Body!


Posts: 1538 | From: boston, ma, USA | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lee
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I'm going to Arizona State and I think it is a good school. But then my education is what I make of it. It has little to do with which school I go to. Bad instructors are a fact of life. But if you're in school to learn and and you're actually studying the subject you're taking instead of studying the instructor to figure out how to make an A, you'll do fine.

I find that most people don't go to school to learn in the first place. They go because they think they have to. They're there for a piece of paper that will help them get a better job. They'll go to class, they'll take notes, they'll read over their notes and read their textbooks. They'll complete all the assignments as well. Then they'll spend the the day or two before a test cramming and worrying whether they'll do well on it. Their purpose in being there isn't to learn the subject, but to figure out which hoops they need to jump through so their teacher will "give" them an A. As a result they don't learn anything, or if they do they don't learn it so that they understand it on any decent level. They'll pass the class, perhaps with an A, and spend the rest of their lives almost as ignorant about the subject as they were the first day of class.

Many of the complaints I hear about professors and instructors are that they don't spoon feed you. Instead they expect you to take some initiative and actually learn the subjects they are teaching.

Each of us is responsible for our own education. It isn't something that we receive, its something we create for ourselves every day in the things we experience and the subjects we explore and master.

Lee


Posts: 175 | From: Tempe, AZ USA | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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