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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » EXPERT ADVICE » Emergencies and Crises » I'm still not sure WHEN someone needs EC... Do I neet it NOW?

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Author Topic: I'm still not sure WHEN someone needs EC... Do I neet it NOW?
Cati
Neophyte
Member # 49875

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Two months ago I asked because I missed a pill for a full 24 hours before I had sex that same day, but my worry was that my boyfriend and I had used condoms but not perfectly that same day. I was told then, when I seeked for professional help, that there was nothing to worry about if I only missed one pill and it wasn't my first box.

However, now I'm confused again because with this box, about 8 days ago, I was 12 hours late with one pill. But the difference is that before that incident I've had sex WITHOUT a condom on multiple occasions, and no withdrawal either. And today too.

In other words: I didn't have sex without a condom for 7 days after the late pill, but I did several times before that and on the 8th day (this morning).

I was wondering if there's still a higher pregnancy risk and wether I should go get EC now. Thank you! [Big Grin]

EDIT: Also I take the lower-dose pills, the ones that have 4 inactive days. In case that matters somehow.

[ 11-24-2011, 05:37 PM: Message edited by: Cati ]

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Stephanie_1
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What you want to do is consider that you're at typical use effectiveness rate, rather than perfect use. 92% effective with typical use: 8 out of every 100 women will become pregnant each year. EC would bring you to around 98% effectiveness, so it's up to you what you're comfortable with.

Also, seeing you're worried about pregnancy have you thought about using the BC buddy system?

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"Sometimes the majority only means that all the fools are on the same side" ~Anon

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Cati
Neophyte
Member # 49875

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Stasitically speaking, then... That risk rate is a bit confusing to me. Does it mean that with typical use 8 out of 100 women became pregnant because they used that method that way the whole year?

I mean, for two years I've only had two late pills, in different months. Do I have the same 8 out of 100 risk rate if those boxes were close to perfect use? Does it consider this month of typical use alone?

Perhaps I want to lower that risk rate then... Do EC affect my current BC, or do I just keep taking the rest of the pills as I would normally do?


EDIT: Oh wait I have another big concern. I have a really big exam next week and I'm worried that if I take EC I will feel terrible and won't be able to study for it for that day or the next... which would be bad. Could that happen? is it painful?

[ 11-25-2011, 02:25 PM: Message edited by: Cati ]

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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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Pretty much, yes. Because the pill is a long-term method, rather than something like condoms, where we can evaluate every single use, it makes to most sense to really look at rates over that one year. And if, in a year, you've taken a pill or two late, then yep, you're using it pretty typically, as people tend to. If it's only been that, I'd say you might figure you're closer to perfect use, maybe more like 95% effectiveness in a year.

And yep, what that means is that of every 100 people using the pill, in one year, 8% (when we're looking at the p2% figure) become pregnant. So, if that sounds like too high a risk for you, then, as plenty of people do, you might want to start using dual contraception: more than one method, like adding condoms to your pill use.

EC is a progestin-only pill. Your combined pill works a lot like it, save that it only has estrogen. If you don't have horrendous side effects from your BC pills, it'd be unlikely for you to experience them with EC.

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Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
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Cati
Neophyte
Member # 49875

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Ok! Thanks, For monthhs I always used condoms along with the pill, but this last month was a bit sloppy condom-wise [Frown] (hence the EC concern)

I will ask my bf to get some EC today, just in case, to be more relaxed these remaining weeks, even though that risk rate doesn't disturb me that much. Thanks for the help! [Big Grin]

Posts: 27 | From: Chile | Registered: Nov 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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