Donate Now
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Got Questions? Get Answers. » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Safer Sex & Birth Control » Birth Control Experiences: the IUD (Page 1)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   
Author Topic: Birth Control Experiences: the IUD
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For those looking into the different methods of birth control to find what's right for them, here's one of several threads where users can report their experiences with a given method so that other users can get a more personal idea of what using a given method is like when they're looking into what might work best for them.

If you have used or do use the IUD (copper or Mirena), please report on it in the following format:

Pros: List what you have experienced as the pros or benefits -- the good parts -- of using this method.

Cons: List what you've experienced as the downsides or cons of using this method.

Ease of use: Talk about how easy -- or not -- it's been for you and/or your partner to use, access and afford this method, how it's worked out in your relationships, etc.

Effectiveness: Talk about how well this method has protected you from pregnancy, and if it ever has failed, note that, including any explanation of how or why, if you know or suspect how or why.

Feel free to also add any extra notes, hints or tips!

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
September
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 25425

Icon 1 posted      Profile for September     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Anyone at all with some experience with the IUD? I am thinking of switching, but getting an IUD is really expensive and I just really want to make sure I know what I'm doing before I shell out the cash.

--------------------
Johanna
Scarleteen Volunteer

"The question is not who will let me, but who is going to stop me." -Ayn Rand

Posts: 9166 | From: Cologne, Germany | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
One biggie with the IUD, Septemner, just so you know, is that it is generally NOT advised for women who are not in long-term monogamous partnerships, due to the increased risks that can be posed if a woman contracts an STI while using the IUD.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Hannahh
Neophyte
Member # 36915

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Hannahh     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm using a Mirena. Had it fitted during surgery to treat endometriosis - I was on the pill beforehand, but hopefully the Mirena will eventually stop my periods, and minimise the pain I was getting at the same time. I'm an odd candidate because of my age - I'm 18, and have had no children - and I was wondering whether that might have anything to do with the experience I've had of it since installment.

A week after having it fitted, I'd finished my last set of pills, and within 4 days my period started. It didn't stop for 15 days, and was erratic in colour, flow, etc etc. Headaches and cramps constantly throughout. Very hard to predict, too - it almost stopped at one point, but the next day it was back again, as if it had never stopped.

That was about a fortnight ago. My doctor said it was par for the course and likely to settle sooner rather than later - if it -didn't-, I'd just have to have it removed. I understand this, of course, it was one of the conditions of having it fitted, but I'm yet to find anyone else with it (due to my age and that of the people I socialise with, I suppose) who can tell me how long it took for them to grow accustomed to it. Any Mirena users out there who can tell me how long it took for them to adjust?

Posts: 3 | From: Newcastle, England | Registered: Feb 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
How long ago was this Hannah? In general, yes, women who have never been pregnant can have a tougher time with insertion, and may also find them less comfortable. But for most women, some spotting and cramping is expected over the first couple months an IUD is inserted.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ocarina
Neophyte
Member # 32310

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ocarina     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've heard that the combination of starting the Mirena and stopping a BCP can lead to some strange side effects. Your body is having to get used to a foreign body and a hormone change at the same time.

The first three months are supposed to be the settling in period. I think that's about right- I'm about four months in and things feel good. My first two periods with it were odd- my pre-IUD cycle was just shy of seven weeks, and these were four. There was much less flow, but my periods lasted twice as long with the added bonus of a couple days of spotting at the beginning. However, since then, I haven't even had PMS, let alone a period.

I think the Mirena may have decreased my sex drive for a couple of months too, but it's kind of hard to be sure because my relationship hit a rough patch around the same time it was put it. Anyway, things are back to normal now, and the only thing that's different is the occasional two-second twinge of a cramp at some random time.

Posts: 16 | From: Massachusetts, USA | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
qeii
Neophyte
Member # 23487

Icon 1 posted      Profile for qeii     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've had my Paraguard (copper iud) for a little over a month, and I'm happy to share what I've experienced so far.

PROS: I really wanted some form of birth control that was long term, highly effective, and hormone free. The copper iud was the only thing that seemed to meet all of this.

I got my iud through Planned Parenthood, which was a great experience. The staff was very friendly, despite the office always being very busy. I had expected some resistance from them because I'm 19 and nulliparous, but they were very supportive and willing to work with me.

CONS: I had the iud inserted on the last day of my period, spotted for a week, and then my period started a week early, and lasted for a week and a half. This didn't bother me so much, but I don't feel comfortable using my menstrual cup anymore, as some people have reported online that they accidentally pulled their iud out when removing their cup. I purchased some reusable cloth pads which are awesome, as I didn't want to ever go back to disposable pads or tampons. I still miss my cup,though.

Insertion wasn't too painful- I took 800 mg ibuprofen 30 minutes before and was given misoprostol to dilate my cervix. The most uncomfortable part was whatever instrument that clamped on my cervix to hold it in place. I had some mild cramping for the rest of the day.

EASE OF USE: The cost of an iud had me balking (and saving) for a long time- especially since I would be paying without insurance. Between the cost of the iud, insertion fee, pap smear, mandatory pregnancy test on the day of the insertion, and std tests... it added up to quite a bit. I had never spent so much money on anything before, but I'm glad my first big purchase was on something to protect my health.

My partner was really supportive about my decision, despite this, I did find myself dealing with some unexpected emotional issues after the insertion. While an iud was completely my idea, and something I have been reading about for years, I felt resentment towards my boyfriend after the insertion. I was crampy, in some pain, and generally not feeling well, and resented that all the responsibility of birth control rested with me. Previously, we had switched off between condom buying duties. We read some articles together about how iud's work and I let him feel my strings, and he thought it was really pretty cool [Smile] I had previously kept him out of the loop a bit- I told him about my appointment for my insertion about a week before hand. I had wanted to make sure I was doing this for myself, not for him- but once we had a good, long talk I felt a lot better about my decision.

EFFECTIVENESS: No problems yet- the effectiveness in studies is ridiculously high, and there is hardly any difference between perfect use and average use.

One of the best resources I found was a livejournal community IUD Divas http://community.livejournal.com/iud_divas/

[ 03-17-2008, 04:00 PM: Message edited by: qeii ]

Posts: 13 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pyro_angel
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 13245

Icon 1 posted      Profile for pyro_angel     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
qeii, that is super helpful! Thanks!
I'm reconsidering hormonal birth control at the moment, and an IUD looks like an option. My mom has the Mirena IUD, and I remember she had some cramping for a few days, then a few months (4? 5?) of weird periods, but she loves it now. I think she's planning to have it removed and a new one inserted right away when it's time.

--------------------
Courtenay

Posts: 593 | From: Kamloops, BC, Canada | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
capecodder
Neophyte
Member # 38361

Icon 1 posted      Profile for capecodder     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've been using the Paragard Copper IUD for two years now after using condoms, Ortho Evra (the patch) and the nuva ring, and so far I like it the best. My doctor was initially hesitant since at the time it was inserted I was only 19 and have never had kids, but I had been in a monogamous relationship for 4 years (which is still going on) and I assured her that I knew all the risks and she agreed to give me one.

Pros: I don't have to deal with buying birth control every month, I don't have to remember to take a pill or replace a patch. It's always there which allows for more spontaneous sex. The copper IUD has no hormones which means my PMS mood swings aren't as severe, and I don't experience nausea or breast tenderness like I did on hormonal methods. It lasts for up to 12 years!

Cons: Significantly heavier periods. I used to have a period that lasted about five days - now it lasts seven, with very heavy bleeding in the first three days, with bad cramps. As long as I keep myself constantly dosed with Ibuprofen for those two or three heavy days I'm fine, but I definitely notice when the painkillers wear off.

Also, insertion was quite painful for me - it felt like one extremely acute very painful cramp - like someone was stabbing me in my belly - and this was after I'd taken 800 mg of Ibuprofen beforehand. My doctor warned me that what I would feel would effectively be a labor cramp, as the cervix would have to stretch to accommodate the IUD - and boy it hurt, but only for a minute or two. The IUD is a T-shape when the arms are extended, and only about an inch tall but to insert it, the arms fold down and the whole thing fits into a straw-like applicator, which is inserted through the cervix and the arms fold out and the straw is removed.

I also experienced a lot of cramping and pretty constant spotting for about a month after it was inserted - but over the months my cycle normalized and now (2 years later) it's almost like I'm not on birth control at all, except my periods are two days longer.

Ease of use: It's been really easy for me to use the IUD - it's pretty much maintenance free. Now and then I reach up and see how long the strings are - my partner says he can't feel them, except for now and then.

My insurance at the time even covered all of the costs - the $150 for insertion and the $365 for the Paragard - so you might want to investigate that.

Effectiveness: So far I've been protected from pregnancy for two years and have only had one scare where my period came really late but I think my body was still getting used to not being on hormonal birth control.


*One note I'd like to make is that I've continued using my menstrual cup, the Keeper, throughout the two years - I just try to be conscious of the strings, but I have never accidentally pulled on them.*

Posts: 1 | From: Massachusetts | Registered: May 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
fantasyflamz
Neophyte
Member # 42148

Icon 1 posted      Profile for fantasyflamz     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm a recent recipient of the Mirena IUD as well. I got it placed about 2 months ago and it's been fairly good so far. It was a great choice for me because I usually have heavier periods (leaving the copper IUD as a no-no) and I was looking for a long-term, easy and cheap form of birth control. I'm 21, but I'm in a long-term relationship and it didn't seem like regular birth control cut it for me. I was pretty consistent in taking it, but I still got pregnant, so I figured I'd try an IUD instead.

After the initial first month, things have been great. Getting it in was the worst pain I've ever felt, but I think it was worth it. As for side effects, I had some spotting for the first 3 weeks or so, and then it stopped. My period didn't return until 1 1/2 months after getting it inserted. Although I had some initial cramping at the beginning, things have pretty much gone away and I don't even notice it anymore. It's the best thing I ever did and I'm glad I don't have to worry about taking the pill every day (I've tried the patch too, but I was always afraid it would peel off) and it's much cheaper in the long run.

Posts: 1 | From: USA | Registered: Feb 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Glameow
Neophyte
Member # 44031

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Glameow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have the Nova T 380, a Copper T IUD, which can stay in for 5 years. I had it fitted around three months ago because I had come to absolutely hate being on the mini pill. The combined pill worked fairly well for me for about 4 years but when I had my first migraine I had to come off it.

Pros:

It's hormone free, I don't have to remember it every day and it doesn't cause side effects and stress every single day of the month.


Cons:

The fitting involved a lot of pain for me, probably the worst I've ever had. My mum said it was worse than labour pain when she had hers fitted, so I guess we have un-co operative cervixes?

I had some pain for a few days after but no bleeding. I took my contraceptive pills for another 5 days and two days after stopping them the bleeding started. I was bleeding rather heavily for about three of the six weeks leading up to my check up, with a couple of week long gaps. I had gone about three months without a period before this and just come off a contraceptive pill, so I expected this kind of craziness. I also experienced much creamier and gloopier discharge and a lot of anxiety about getting an infection (I am a complete hypochondriac). I told the doctor at my 6 week check up about all of this and she didn't seem worried, said it was normal and reassured me.

Since then I've had one more "regular" period that lasted 5 days and came at the right time. The bleeding has been heavier and more painful than anything I've had before, but good painkillers and my Moon cup really help out there. Also, the pain isn't constant throughout the bleed, but only for the first few days or so. It is miserable, but really not that bad for me, and certainly much more tolerable compared to what I experienced on the mini-pill.


Ease of use:

I had it fitted in an NHS walk in clinic, so it was all free and access was very quick and easy.

For me, it's been very easy to use as I don't have to do anything with it other than check it's still in place periodically. Aside from that I don't know it's there.

Unfortunately my partner has recently complained about it after sex once or twice. We've had lots of sex where he said he couldn't feel it at all and he said it was fine for ages before it suddenly became an issue. He agrees that it's most likely a combination of my feeling different when my period is due and being squeamish about it; he didn't actually feel anything, just some vague discomfort. We've only had sex once since he said that, which he said it was fine, but I don't consider this issue "resolved" as yet.

We had of course discussed it before the fitting and I would never have had it without his agreement .. but he's always been resistant to using anything other than the pill so I think some adjustment time is needed or a rethink if it really becomes a problem for him.


Effectiveness:

As far as I know, it has worked perfectly since the fitting, though that's only a very short time of course.

Posts: 2 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Glameow
Neophyte
Member # 44031

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Glameow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
To add to my post, we had trouble again with my IUD causing possible discomfort during sex.

This time I got my partner to feel the threads for himself to see if he thinks they are big and substantial enough to be a problem and he thinks they are. They are quite long and actually feeling a little more pronounced to me than usual, so I am going to get it checked on Monday, make sure it's all in place and see if I can get the threads trimmed down..

Posts: 2 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ecofem
Activist
Member # 13388

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Ecofem     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I had a consultation to get a Mirena IUD this week and will probably getting one inserting during my period this or next month. On one hand, I'm very excited because I haven't been totally happy with other birth control options I've used and an IUD seems to have those covered.

However, I do have some concerns. The initial cost will be extremely high; at $925 due to NO insurance coverage, it's way more than anything I've heard before. (I'd ask my partner to pitch in but he's a student with very limited funds whereas I work two jobs so I'm absorbing all the costs.) I've heard people talking about it being the "worst pain ever" and that frightens me a bit, even though I don't think I have a low tolerance for pain; likewise, I've always gotten through even the most painful stuff in my life so I think I'll be ok. My GYN gave me some medicine to take before insertion that may open my cervix a bit and I'm also going in when I have my period. I work a lot and can't really take off more than maybe an afternoon for this. (My GYN who apparently inserts about five IUDs a week wasn't too worried about this; she said that if I had to go back to work, I could take some ibuprofen, take it easy, and be ok.) I'm also concerned that my uterus won't be big enough and that will be pretty disappointing; fortunately, I won't have to pay for it if that's the not the case but, unfortunately, I'll be back at square one.

My greatest concern is the issue of monogamy. My new-but-dependable GYN does believe that monogamy is important for having an IUD due to the small but potential increased STI risks although I did not discuss this with her in-depth. (Heather also mentions this earlier in the thread.) No, I'm not concerned about being able to stick or it or not; that's what I'm currently having, but I wonder what would happen should I change or add partners? Of course, I'd use latex barriers and people involved would get tested. However, I'm guessing that spontaneous hook-ups (even with latex barriers) for either my partner or me would be out of question due to the risk factors? When you divide that big amount by five, it comes down to a very manageable $185/year. However, it's not quite as cost-effective if I were to remove it after just one or two years.

I guess I'm just not as ready as I thought I was for an IUD. Still, it does seem like the best option for me right now and in the long-run. However, at that price, I do want to be cautious. I think the best decision may be to wait another month or so; I'm in a long-distance relationship anyway so that shouldn't be hard although I'd like to have it in for awhile before we see each other again.

EDITED to add: I know it can take a few months to adjust to it. I don't mind spotting but I hope that the small dose of progesterone doesn't give me a hard time. While I sure wouldn't mind my periods becoming shorter, I also would hate to see mine completely disappear as can sometimes happen. (It did to my sister.) I guess you just have to risk the side effects to reap the possible benefits!

In any case, I'd appreciate hearing from people with specific knowledge and/or experience with IUDs. Thanks! [Smile]

[ 01-09-2010, 07:46 PM: Message edited by: Ecofem ]

Posts: 3318 | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ecofem
Activist
Member # 13388

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Ecofem     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I just wanted to share that I got my IUD inserted as planned this past week. I'll skip the details for now; however, I can say that I'm glad I got it. I was pretty nervous beforehand and had a TON of questions that I was able to direct to the doctor, friends with IUDs, etc. so that worked out well. And it was hardly painful for me: at times I get absolutely horrid cramps so this IUD insertion pales in comparison! My follow-up appointment in a month so we'll see. My fingers are crossed that this will remain a positive decision! [Smile]
Posts: 3318 | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
onceuponatime
Neophyte
Member # 30895

Icon 1 posted      Profile for onceuponatime     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I got my Mirena IUD inserted in early August '08

PROS: it's nice not worrying about birth control every day.
The insertion wasn't painful, just uncomfortable for me (then again, they did give me a cervix softener because i've never been pregnant before). I drove myself home afterwards, and wasn't in any pain for the following days.
There's no estrogen in the Mirena, which is great for someone like me who has migraines with aura. My migraines have actually been reduced!!!!
I've experienced NO cramps, weight gain, extra acne, etc.


CONS: I'M STILL BLEEDING. It's been over six months now, and while most others have stopped spotting a few weeks in, there have been very few days where I haven't been spotting. It's extreeeeemely irritating, but thankfully I'm single now so this is the best time as any to let my body adjust fully to this IUD.


EASE OF USE: Easy!! My insurance covered the insertion, so five years of birth control came down to a two or three $25 copays at the doctor's office.


Overall, i LOVE the idea of an low-hormone IUD, and I love the side effect of cutting down my migraines, but I'm upset at how my body has adjusted. If the spotting keeps up for much longer, I'm gonna resort to removing it. I'd rather find a different birth control than avoid sex because I'm constantly bleeding.

Posts: 13 | From: Massachusetts | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Martie
Neophyte
Member # 46437

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Martie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Mind, if I add?

I had my Mirena inserted on the 24th of November. before that I have always been on the nuva-ring and although that was comfortable I did not like having to continue to call the doctor to order me a new prescription every month. i also didn't like to have to predict when i'll be having my period of not. not fun. since i have never been pregnant the doctor wanted to insert on my heaviest flow date, but it was hard to predict because of the fact i had messed up my nuva ring insertion dates. so i guess that it would have started on thanksgiving but since the doctor would have been closed that day they scheduled on the 24th.......

Pros: i decided on Mirena because of the lack of that inconvenience and according to my gyn "absolutely NO risk of pregnancy" and for little to no periods for 5 years. I feel more free with it, i could go swimming whenever i want, i feel so self consicous if people are stareing at me, and my boyfriend is pretty cool with it.

Cons: they did NOT give me anything when they insert it. the pain was pretty awful. i felt everything.
I sometimes feel a slight tug when i do some contortion. and every now and then i get a little pain in my side. but the most embarrassing thing is when i start spotting eigther before or after, and it smells weird. ugh. and sometimes the end of it will poke my boyfriend during sex. it's pretty painful for him but i feel it when it happens

but overall I love the Mirena. i think it's deffinately worth the pain and i havent had any major problems with it as far as i can tell.

Posts: 12 | From: florida | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
(Martie, what do you mean they used nothing? If so, that was NOT standard or recommended practice. Standard practice is a doctor at LEAST giving you, or suggesting you take an NSAID -- like ibuporfen -- around an hour before insertion. They did not do even that?)

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Martie
Neophyte
Member # 46437

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Martie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
they just suggested something like advil and i took that an hour before but of course, nothing. ibuprofen and midol don't do too much for me... but no "cervix looseners" or anything like that to numb the pain.

according to them a lot of the pain that went along with it was because i have a tilted uterus. a tilted uterus would make it uncomfortable during sex and may make it difficult to conceive.

[ 04-02-2010, 08:09 PM: Message edited by: Martie ]

Posts: 12 | From: florida | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Actually, "tilted uterus" as a concept is fairly questionable, since the uterus is attached to ligaments so tilts all the time, depending on any of our posture. As well, the uterus really isn't contacted during sex, so saying that is a bit of an old wives tale.

Given those comments, and them not softening the cervix -- which, especially if you haven't given birth, is very odd to skip -- makes it sound like you simply didn't have a very good OB/GYN, period.

Sorry to hear it was such a bad experience for you, but I'd advise finding a new GYN, regardless. [Frown]

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Martie
Neophyte
Member # 46437

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Martie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
i don't know who else our insurance covers. and i am not sure who exactly i would go too.... I'm not "paranoid" but I'm not sure if my primary doctor really takes the best care of me.
my family and i all go to him because he's the only doctor in our area who takes our insurance and he's pretty friendly with my parents (both ex-military, as in if they have foot or headache problems then he sends them to the doctor of that field and/or tends to their every need but if i go in for breathing problems and heart fluttering he just says an anxiety attack and sends me to a counselor. which did not help. :/

but i wouldn't say the experience was all for nothing. i got it and it's stayed in despite the first couple times my boyfriend and i having sex for the first time and us fearing it fell out and the sudden cramps, or it poking him again. no baby and no period. life's pretty good for me ;] at the moment at least heh.

[ 04-03-2010, 12:27 AM: Message edited by: Martie ]

Posts: 12 | From: florida | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
atm1
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 37835

Icon 1 posted      Profile for atm1     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Breathing problems and heart palpitations are really something that should be taken seriously. If your doctor isn't, I'd strongly suggest pushing him for a referral at least for some basic tests such as blood test to check for hypothyroidism, an EKG, and a peak flow test to check lung function. None of those tests would be hard or expensive, and they could help you find a problem that should be treated. You also might want to try cutting out/down on caffeine if you consume a lot of it.

(And even in people who have anxiety problems and are relatively sure it's anxiety, sometimes it is worth checking these things too. Even though the one counselor I saw for PTSD was generally terrible, at least he said, "Have you been tested for X, Y and Z, because your symptoms really could be something physical.")

How is your relationship with your parents? Could one of them come with you and advocate for you during the appointment?

Posts: 2262 | From: in transition | Registered: Apr 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Martie
Neophyte
Member # 46437

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Martie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
atm, i have had breathing problems on and off about a year or two ago, before i got the mirena. and our primary doctor; cardiologist. i went through all the blood tests and wore a 24 hour heart monitor and they never found anything. i barely ever ingest caffeine, i mostly drink water and tea. and these occurrences are SO entirely random, i could be in class listening to a lector, to walking to my car, to laying around my house watching tv. when it happens it doesn't last long enough that by the time i'm at the doctor its gone and they can't find anything wrong with me.

my relationship with my parents is good. but they would just agree with him.

[ 04-04-2010, 11:25 PM: Message edited by: Martie ]

Posts: 12 | From: florida | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Well, that's certainly different than just being sent to a counselor.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Martie
Neophyte
Member # 46437

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Martie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
But I don't think i have anxiety.

[ 04-05-2010, 07:51 PM: Message edited by: Martie ]

Posts: 12 | From: florida | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I understand, but what you had first told us was that for those symptoms, you were only referred to a counselor, not that you had all those tests done by a cardiologist. That's why atm1 said what she did. It may also be why your PCP is suggesting those symptoms may be from anxiety, since physical causes have been, it sounds like, ruled out.

Regardless, it's unlikely your insurance only covers one primary care physician, so you could certainly do some research, make some calls, and find out what your other options are.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
toocuteks
Neophyte
Member # 46757

Icon 1 posted      Profile for toocuteks         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi, I'm almost 24 and had my Mirena IUD inserted a month ago.

Pros: Well, I love the fact that I can be covered for up to 5 years, which puts me at the age where I want to start a family. My skin has been noticably clearer (it started breaking out after having been on Ortho Tri-cyclin Lo for 7 years). It's a lot easier for me not have to worry about packing my B.C. when going to my boyfriend's for a few days, or using condoms.

Cons: I forgot to take anything before going to the doctors, so the pain was definitely wirth noting. But honestly, it was a 7 out of 10 and it meant that i would be baby-free until I was ready, so it was so worth it. I had cramping for the next four days, but a foreign object was placed in my reproductive system, I'd be concerned if my body didn't react. I've been spotting since insertion, but it hasn't been bad. No panties have been ruined yet. Um, I think that's about it.

Experience: The first time my boyfriend and I had sex (about 7 days after insertion), i asked how it felt, and if he experienced any pain. He said that he felt like something was kind of pushing back when he thrusted, but that it wasn't an unpleasant feeling, just different. We've had sex plenty of times since and he hasn't brought it up.

Effectiveness: baby-free

Concerns: I've never had regular periods and have been on the pill since 16 so I don't really know/can predict when my cycle should come. Since Mirena can make periods really light or non-existence anyways, other than checking for strings is there any way to ensure that I am not pregnant in the absence of a period? I know about the risk of ectopic pregnancy and the warning signs, but I was hoping I wouldn't have to rely on looking out for pelvic pain.

Posts: 2 | From: Virginia | Registered: Apr 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
toocute: if missing periods worries you, what I suggest to Mirena or Depo users in that spot is just to buy yourself a box of pregnancy tests and take one now and then for peace of mind.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cthulhu_hungers
Neophyte
Member # 47022

Icon 1 posted      Profile for cthulhu_hungers     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I feel like I should post my experience, because I’m one of those rare, once-in-a-decade patients that gynecologists sometimes have that actually rejected my implant the first time around.

Pros: I got the IUD because I started having sex and decided to get a more regular method of birth control. For whatever reason, they guys around my town either have no condoms or won’t wear one, so my birth control so far has been abstaining from vaginal sex. My experience will the pill taught me that I would always be anxious on daily birth control and hormones do bad things to my head and body, so I went with the copper IUD after researching different methods of birth control. I am 22 and in college, and assuming that I have a child at 27 (the average age of marriage being 26 + 1 year, the average age newlyweds wait before they try to conceive) the IUD (500 dollars with the discount) would cost me 8.30 a month. The cheapest birth control option available at the women’s health center is 13 dollars a month, 25 dollars without the student discount. Therefore, the IUD was the cheapest option.

Cons: The initial cost was a little pricey, but the women’s health center got a discount so that I could still afford it. My family did not support me going on birth control, but I told them that at the end of the day, I could afford it out-of-pocket and they couldn’t stop me. It took a month to schedule an appointment for the surgery, since it can only be done after a period I had to take what was essentially progesterone to induce bleeding (I don’t have many periods)

Easy of Use: The first time it was put in, I had two periods and constant spotting in the month after it was put it, as well as pain in the first week. During the operation I had pain, but not an unmanageable amount; nothing that I couldn’t control with deep breaths and my gynecologist did mention that I didn’t look like I was in pain at all during the procedure. When I went in for my checkup (two months latter), it turned out that my uterus had gone Hulk on my implant- it was sticking out of my cervix and my gynecologist just pulled it out with a pair of forceps. It was actually bent out of shape when she pulled it out. Finding out that my uterus has super strength would be awesome if I wanted to fight crime with said herculean uterus, but less awesome if I want to actually have an implant in there. Paraguard did send us a replacement one, and two months later (today) I got the second one put in. the bleeding and pain is noticeably less this time around, so hopefully this time it will stick. I’ll update on June 10th, when I get the implant checked for a second time. I doubt that it is a uterine abnormality, since I have been checked for that already.

TLDR: Your uterus can reject the implant, though it is once-in-a-decade rare. This can be because of a uterine anomaly, or because your uterus has superpowers. You need to do it immediately after a period, and if time is an issue, ask for a drug called medroxyprogesterone that can induce a “faux” period (bleeding but no ovulation). Also, if you are at college, your women’s health center might have a student discount on this and other birth control methods. Also, ask your IUD manufacturer if they will ship you a new one if you reject it, in case something like that happens. Also, for the people wondering the cost analysis on an IUD, a 900 dollar IUD pays itself off (ie, it’s cost per month equals that off the cheapest birth control method, which I believe for now is a certain formulation of Yaz at 25 dollars- correct me if I am wrong) after three years. So you should get an IUD if you need birth control for more than 3 years.

Posts: 39 | From: United States | Registered: May 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Finding out that my uterus has super strength would be awesome if I wanted to fight crime with said herculean uterus, but less awesome if I want to actually have an implant in there.
This may be one of the best sentences I have ever seen posted here. [Smile]

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cthulhu_hungers
Neophyte
Member # 47022

Icon 1 posted      Profile for cthulhu_hungers     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
thank you, I try.
Posts: 39 | From: United States | Registered: May 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cthulhu_hungers
Neophyte
Member # 47022

Icon 1 posted      Profile for cthulhu_hungers     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Promised I'd give an update when I was checked a second time. It didn't attach, again. We're not trying it a third time, since it's unlikely to work and I've graduated and now have no access to health services of any kind. Plus my chances of a refund are really slim.

So yeah, life sucks right now. My last chance at the point in time is the shot, and if that doesn't work (if I have a bad reaction to progesterone the same way I've had to estrogen in the past) I'm really screwed.

Posts: 39 | From: United States | Registered: May 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Parapluie
Neophyte
Member # 43325

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Parapluie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have a Flexi-T 300 copper IUD and I've had it for almost 3 months now. [Smile]

Pros: I never have to think about my birth control, hormone free, my boyfriend and I have been tested clear for STI's and I personally find not using condoms to be a plus for me. Mainly I just love not thinking about my birth control, and it's also very private.

Cons: Trying to get the IUD was the main downside. [Razz] My cervix just would not let anything into it. It took three tries to get it in. And occasionally (though not often) it kinda jabs my boyfriend in the penis. Also, before I had my cervix numbed, it really really hurt trying to get it in.

Ease of use: Well, I never have to think about it! So it's been pretty easy so far. The doctor put it in and I didn't bleed or spot at all, no weird cramping, I felt pretty much normal. I just check the strings/ my cervix once a month and I'm good to go. My periods are NOT insane periods from hell that drag on for days and have me in a ball on the floor. Not at all. In fact, my periods are exactly the same as they were before any kind of birth control (fairly light, short, 3-5 days) with the addition of slightly more cramping. But it's nothing a heating pad and some advil can't take care of. Access to an IUD wasn't difficult, since I just went through a local community health clinic that services teens and they were happy to help me. Affording the first IUD was not a huge problem either. I don't have insurance, so my partner and I had to pay out of pocket, but the IUD only cost $60. I had to buy two IUD's though since the first one didn't work out, but I talked to the clinic about affording it and they offered to pay $45 of the $60 ( [Big Grin] very nice people) for the IUD, which makes my total cost for 5 years of birth control, $75 or $1.25 a month/ 5 years. It's worked out well in my relationship, my boyfriend and I both enjoy the peace of mind, since its very effective. It's been a welcome addition to our relationship. [Smile] Overall, very easy breezy birth control for me.

Effectiveness: I'm very confident in the effectiveness of my IUD, and I'm not pregnant so it must be working! I gotta admit, it was a little nerve racking not using condoms at first. It felt weird to completely trust the effectiveness of something I can't see. It just...works. My boyfriend felt the same way, so we continued to use condoms for a while after I had the IUD inserted.

All in all, having an IUD has been very easy, pretty affordable and I would definitely recommend trying it to anyone looking for long term birth control.

--------------------
"The truth of all predictions is always in your hands."

Posts: 38 | From: Canada | Registered: Jul 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
(Hay Parapluie -- and anyone else curious about this.

You're not the first person whose partner has said they felt an IUD. However, every time I hear it, I go, "Huh?" because an IUD is in your uterus, an organ the penis can't reach, so that strikes me as impossible. But I went ahead and double checked with an OB/GYN I work with who puts in more IUDs than anyone I know.

Just so you know, she also made clear it isn't possible UNLESS a) an IUD is not inserted correctly, or b) the strings are not cut correctly. In the latter case, it's the strings a partner would be feeling, not the IUD. So, if your partner is saying he can feel the IUD or something from it -- and you're pretty sure he's not just feeling more, period, by virtue of not using a condom -- while I know you've been in about this a lot so it's probably the last thing you want to hear, you should probably have your healthcare provider take a look once more to be sure your strings were cut right and your IUD is where it's supposed to be.)

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 67933 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Parapluie
Neophyte
Member # 43325

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Parapluie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I meant to say that the strings jab my boyfriend in the penis. [Razz] Sorry, you're right, the IUD is certainly not sticking out my cervix or anything! I had my check up two weeks ago and she said it was all good and that the strings have just yet to soften up and curl up around my cervix. I was worried about that myself and she assured me that everything is alright. It's hard to explain the way the strings are situated, kinda like...they come out my cervix and then bend backwards. And they're made of a fishing wire sort of material, so the part of the strings that bend is fairly hard.

--------------------
"The truth of all predictions is always in your hands."

Posts: 38 | From: Canada | Registered: Jul 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Parapluie
Neophyte
Member # 43325

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Parapluie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I went and checked just now to be sure (also, I'm paranoid [Razz] ), and the strings aren't actually twisted around each other anymore and they feel softer as a result. Maybe there won't be anymore poking! She left the strings about 2 cm long, by the way.

--------------------
"The truth of all predictions is always in your hands."

Posts: 38 | From: Canada | Registered: Jul 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3