Donate Now
  New Poll  
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Bodies » Fertility & Infertility: Truths & Myths

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Fertility & Infertility: Truths & Myths
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
One thing that's come up often here with users on or considering hormonal contraception is the concern that they will cause infertility, something they have never been found to be associated with in many, many studies.

Another is the idea that pregnancy often happens very quickly, with only one time of intercourse at any given time. Or, the inverse, that pregnancy is very unlikely for everyone during most of each fertility cycle.

But none of this is a big shocker, because there's a lot people don't know about fertility and infertility.

So, have questions? Want to sort out truths vs. myths, realities versus fears? If so, let's go! [Smile]

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Cian
Activist
Member # 44405

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Cian     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
A lot of people seem to think that infertile women do not have periods. I find it a silly sentiment, as infertility usually comes as surprise to the given person, and you'd think that a complete absence of periods thus far would have tipped them off. Also something I have come across an alarmingly numerous amount of times; only women are infertile. Obviously untrue.

Are there ways to test your fertility rate at an early age? Preferably one not terribly painful. I have suffered and currently suffer from conditions that can lower fertility rates in women. I worry I may not be able to have children because of this, but don't know if it's possible to test your fertility before you actually have attempted pregnancy for some time.

Posts: 239 | From: Europe | Registered: Oct 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
"Fertility rate" really isn't the right term here, since that term is about groups over time, not about one person. And the thing about fertility is that there is more than one thing to account for, especially if we're not just talking about conceiving, but also about sustaining a pregnancy.

Really, there's usually no reason for anyone to get fertility "tested" before they even try to become pregnant. When we're talking about something other than sperm count, it's extensive, expensive and usually healthcare providers, to my knowledge, just can't justify it unless someone has had problems becoming pregnant. Know what I mean?

But for sure, yes: some people who have fertility problems stop menstruating or don't ever, others still do. And people of any gender can be fertile or not (though with a couple intersex conditions, infertility can be a given).

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Cian
Activist
Member # 44405

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Cian     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Oops, sorry about the terminology mishap there! Thanks for your answer, I'm mostly concerned whether this will mount to enormous bills on my part as my future pregnancy will most likely be a medical affair assuming I will stay, as planned, in my same-sex partnered relationship. Suppose time will tell! Or is there a different procedure for same-sex partners?
Posts: 239 | From: Europe | Registered: Oct 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Oh, no worries, must mentioned it to make clear why I couldn't tell you that as you were asking. [Smile]

I really don't see any reason to be concerned about all of this right now. Can you clue me in on why you are? I don't want to just dismiss your worries out of hand.

(And no, I don't know that there are different protocols when it comes to testing fertility for same-sex partners. My impression is it's the same deal, save that if you're doing in-clinic IVF, some of the screens that'd happen with fertility are basically part of that process.)

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Cian
Activist
Member # 44405

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Cian     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Oh, I'm just a family oriented person, IVF is very expensive and not covered by any kind of insurance, and I have long standing health issues that can affect fertility such as prolonged underweight and anemia, as well suspected endometriosis (but much too scared to get tested presently). I know we won't be trying to get pregnant for a good five or more years, but I have a "find solace in knowledge" mentality. Although I am distraught at the idea of never having children whom are genetically mine, selfish as that is, it isn't a very current worry to have and I acknowledge that. [Smile]
Posts: 239 | From: Europe | Registered: Oct 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Heather
Executive Director & Founder
Member # 3

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Heather     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Okay.

I guess looking at that, I personally am not seeing any cause for reasonable concern about a lack of fertility. In other words, those three things not only don't mean someone can't conceive and sustain a healthy pregnancy, but a) it sounds like the one with the most likely maybe-issue is only a guess, not an actual and b) the other two issues could change, and feasibly even be changed if they don't on their own with some nutritional help.

The other thing to know is that before even trying to become pregnant, to do what one can to assure a healthy pregnancy, you'd want to have all of those things checked out regardless. And have healthcare if you're going to become pregnant, to boot.

But really, it just seems WAY early to be worrying about this now if you're asking me, especially when there really isn't anything to point to infertility being any more likely for you than for anyone else.

That said with the endo? If any healthcare provider strongly suspects you have endo and has said as much, I'd suggest you have that looked into. Personally, I think potentially untreated illness, especially one that can be so incredibly painful -- is a lot scarier than just finding out what the deal is and looking into treatment. I'd propose that if it seems the other way around, there are probably some misconceptions afoot either about healthcare in general, that healthcare or endo.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

  New Poll   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3