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Author Topic: Gumdrop grl
Barbarosa
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You must be doing well in school, ( I assume you are in school, your bio said you were a nursing student, but I see you have been on the boards since 2000)
I read your post on the lactic acid in milk/cramps thread. I was about to post, but you covered the topic well.
You get an "A" in disaccharides, and central metabolic pathways. "A" also in pharmacology.
I hope you decide to become a nurse practitioner, it is a cool job.
My old text Gynocology and Well Woman Care, by Lichtman and Paperra (I hope I got those right, especially if they are reading this post) had a section on exercises specific to treat dysmenorrhea, they were mainly stretches as I recall.

Posts: 380 | From: Up North, Wisconsin | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LilBlueSmurf
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I think you may have GumdropGirl and myself mixed up

As far as i know, GumdropGirl is doing grad studies in Public Health. I'm the Nursing Student.

(That would definealty be her post that you're talking about tho ... )

[This message has been edited by LilBlueSmurf (edited 09-12-2004).]


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Barbarosa
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How embarassing! I am sorry for the mix-up, but I stand by my reccomendation that being an NP is a cool job. You knew the lactate - lactose thing anyway Ill bet!

Are you near graduating? I have to chuckel at your smurfy name as I have a pair of blue scrubs I wear to my office that is almost perfect smurf blue... at least my beard isnt white (as you can tell by my name) like papa smurf...


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LilBlueSmurf
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I'm about half way into the program. I just started my third year and should be graduating in May or June of 2006.

I have defineatly thought about the NP thing ... In Ontario i think we only have primary care and acute care NP. I think i'd prefer primary care, but i'm not sure. You have to have 5 yrs experience as an RN (i think ...?) before you can even apply to an NP program.

What kind of NP are you? If i were in the states, i think i'd do womens health or pediatrics.


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Barbarosa
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I have had a great career in Nursing, total of 23 years (yipes!), last 1/2 has been as an NP. Every minute of the first decade defintely added to my skills now even though this was not my original intent. I was doing basic research and working towards a doctorate in Nursing, and planned to have a cushy academic seat. I think it all worked out for the better...

My training is in primary care/family medicine, and that is what my national certification is in.

I like the idea of 5 years practice prior to being considered, tho not all programs have that requirement here. A few programs (Yale, UCSF) use to have post bachelors programs for non-nurses, (BS in other "health related" science and 3 years, poof your an NP!) but I am unsure what the staus of these programs are now. Planned Parenthood has some great options here for womens health NPs as well. I just had a graduate student that was getting her Family certification, that is to say she had gone back to school as she was already certified as a WHNP, but needed to get her Masters degree.

The history of the NP movement in Canada is very interesting, and back in the dark ages I had some familiarity with the political aspects, although it may vary by province? The biggest problem was the MDs opposed wider use of NPs. A large Canadian based study looked at NP vs MD care, and overall was quite favorable, but when asked after the study the MDs did not want the help!
Same thing happens here, but for different reasons methinks (dont get me started). Happily the opposition is losing ground as people want more options, and are generally very happy with their NP provided care.

Gosh, the way I keep refering to the old days I must sound ancient.

When I started as an RN (back in the dark ages) there was a pretty bad shortage of RNs in the states and I worked with some great RNs from Canada. The work visa was easy(er) to get because the hospitals helped and the AHA had lobbied for some health occupation related exceptions. There was a huge efflux of Nurses at that time southward. There is a similar shortage of RNs again in the states, sorry this is beginning to sound like a recruitment letter.

Good luck to you, drop me a line if you want more info...


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LilBlueSmurf
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Depending on the job prospects here, you might not have to try hard to recrute me There's been a lot of talk about there being lots of jobs for nurses, but very few of them full time. Meanwhile, states in the US are coming up here and saying "We'll pay your moving expenses, you can have a few months rent, we'll give you a signing bonus, and here, have a car too !!" ... No wonder our nurses are going down there, really.

I'm also interested in the nurse-midwife programs. There is no nurse to midwife program here ... Just a direct entry program that's very competitive right now.

So you have your own office and everything? That's pretty cool

(I've been hearing of NP's opening practices around here ... But they're still few and far between.)


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Barbarosa
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I thought about midwife programs too as I was finishing my family practice program.

I looked at a few, one program director told me that the faculty were not sure that a male could be a midwife ( well strictly defining the whole wife part ok..), and some might feel strongly about that. (Whoa!) Happily being of sound mind I replied that I knew in my heart that the qualities that make me an outstanding nurse are the same qualities that would allow me to be an outstanding Midwife (um mid-husband?). Needless to say I did not call them back, but I am happy to report that my feelings have proven to be true for primary care.

If I happen to deliver a baby now, it is a case of being at the wrong place at the wrong time! I look at it this way, a 100K deliveries go just as the design provides, perfectly. Most often inspite of what we profess, no thanks to us. That rare one in a million that does not carries the risk of 2 lives in the balance, and it often goes quite catastrophically wrong in a hurry. I now feel that to try to do both (primary care and helping birth babys) and be good enough to accept that challenge is more than I can promise. So I assist at the occasional scheduled C section, and console myself with providing excellent care for the maternal child unit after delivery. It works out pretty good for all of us in the end.

The challenges in family practice are more than enough to keep my interest for at least this lifetime!

I love family practice because of the process of care in a small community. I have accepted that there is more than enough to know trying to do my best in primary care, and adding delivery responsibilties might not add to that. I am learning about balance in my professional life (I do seem to be a slow learner though)

I have been here long enough to see newborns for their 2 week checks grow to be amazing little beings in first grade! I am told that it gets weirder when you start seeing those kids have children. Jeeze I will be old then!

As to my practice, I am here by myself with 3 office staff to make it all work in spite of me. We are owned by corporate medicine (they cant take our souls!), and employed by a group practice. My clinic is about 10 miles from the local hosptial and the nearest clinic in my group, or any others for that matter. My community had never had nor heard of NPs before I came. I am happy to report after 7 years of hard work they would not trade me for anything or anyone.

When I realized the potential primary care offered me as an NP and left research (maybe I should say came to my senses) this really was exactly my fantasy, crazy as that sounds. It is a great little spot.

When I need a dose of academic medicine I can usually convince someone to let me do a lecture on something at UW whatever and that scratches the itch.

If you are keen on this role, and do not have an obligation to stay in Canada and practice to pay back the system, many schools do not have a minimum pratice requirement here, though some clinical practice really is needed. You could say you want to come to the states to see how it is here as an NP, get your degree, then go back and revolutionize Canada NP-dome!

There are lots of opportunities world wide for nurses really, in just about any capacity, you are only limited by your imagination.

The US healthcare un-system is really very broken as far as access to care, cost and all, and each year I expect to have to learn to raise sheep as the whole thing implodes, but it keeps on going in spite of the odds of its survival. I probably better get off my soap box before I really get going on that one...


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Barbarosa
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Oh God I am wordy, and apparently tend to romanticize. Oh well,

Anyway, if you do look south for work, look into the visa thing early, and try to hook up with an academic center with university affiliation. There are many options, and you can specify "I need access to an _____ NP program, how will that work?"

Also look into RN reciprocity, think about what states you might consider and check on the board statusd for foriegn RN grads. I assume you are in a BSN type program? The Diploma program here is pretty much dead, though the ADN lives on.

Being a graduate nurse in the US these days really is like going to Alaska during the gold rush wearing a sign that reads "I need a husband". You get alot of attention, and not all of it is good. It may be different in 2006, but I have seen these cycles before.

If I did not do family I would do pediatrics in a heart beat. No doubt.


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Heather
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Bear in mind, Hollie, that if Bush stays in office, moving to the US could be a really bad move.

(Flatly, I'd not advise it period if you're in Canada, but that's my bias.)

I wouldn't be at all surprised if midwife programs and coverage were cut soon and made even more unavailable than they already are.


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Milke
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Oddly enough, it was actually a tiny change Bush made to immigration laws that allowed me to stay in the US. And despite the inherent weirdness of moving from a place that has four seasons to the middle of the Sonoran desert, I'm glad to be here. It's a completely different culture -- it varies from state to state, even, and I know I prefer some to others, but it's not a bad place. It has changed some of my views, and even my politics in ways I never would have expected, but life experience tends to do that to a person. To sum things up from a Canadian perspective, one of many, despite the polarized views that seem so common over here, this country, and its politics, exist in shades of grey.

------------------
Milke, with an L, Mrs BD to you, RATS, TMNTP, MF, CWCD, WAOTA

. . . Nor do the wind, the sun and the rain


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LilBlueSmurf
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It all sounds so cool ) I wish we did some family medicine type stuff in our program, but there's only so many clinical placements that can be done in a certain amount of time ...

I am in a BScN program (four years). Ontario recently made it so that to be an RN, you have to have a degree (as of 2005), but before that you could do a 3 year diploma program instead. The arguement as to whether that should've happened or not goes both ways ... But it's defineatly setting up more barriers for those who actually want a career in nursing. University tuition is easily twice as much as college tuition, for one.

Heather,

I wouldn't live in the US while Bush is still in office. I'm hoping your country comes to their senses and gives him the boot (and that is just my very personal opinion as someone who does not live in the United States).

I don't really want to leave Canada ... But i do want a full time job. If i work as an RN for a while and don't like it, i'd like the chance to become a nurse-midwife without having to do four more years of university.

Unfortuneatly, graduation is still two years off. What i'll do and where i'll do it seems so far off ... and a little out of reach right now.


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Barbarosa
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I might not be living in the US is I am faced with another 4 years.

Fixed!

[This message has been edited by Barbarosa (edited 09-15-2004).]

[This message has been edited by Barbarosa (edited 09-15-2004).]


Posts: 380 | From: Up North, Wisconsin | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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