Donate Now
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Got Questions? Get Answers. » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » The Randoms » What do these mean?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: What do these mean?
Star * Gal
Neophyte
Member # 3379

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Star * Gal     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Since i'm not from the US, i was wondering if someone would be able to explain the whole school system to me. I read all these books, and watch these movies, and they talk about being a sophomore (spelling) and freshmen and juniors and seniors and stuff, but i have no idea what ages these people would be. Would someone be able to help me out and tell me? Thanx. Also, i was wondering are American schools like what they are on all those American teen movies, with busy corridors etc and a cafeteria, where you don't have to pay for the food? Thanx heaps everyone
Posts: 11 | From: Somewhere not in America | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ThisGuy
Activist
Member # 968

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ThisGuy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Search me.

I grew up with terms like "grade one", or "year 12", etc.

You need a code book to understand some of this stuff, I think.

Here's my limited knowledge:
Freshman = first year.
Sophomore = year above that.

Oh yeah, and the cheerleader chick who screams a lot is the one who always gets diced in horror movies!

------------------
Bow down before me, for I am Testicles the mighty Greek warrior!


Posts: 915 | From: Australia | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lynne
Activist
Member # 713

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lynne     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The American school system starts with kindergarten (around ages five to six) and then has grades one through twelve. This doesn't include college. Grades nine through twelve are what a typical high school is made up of. People in grade nine are around the ages of 13 and 14; people finishing up grade twelve can usually be anywhere from seventeen to nineteen. Grade nine is freshman year, grade ten is sophomore year, grade eleven is junior year, and grade twelve is senior year. (This is actually the same system used for college undergraduates: first year is freshman, second year sophomore, third year junior, fourth year senior.) Not all high schools look like the ones you see in movies, with busy indoors corridors. I suspect not all public high schools are as busy as the ones in movies either, but I don't know -- I went to a tiny private high school. As for not having to pay for food: beats me. At the schools I've been to, the only people who never had to pay were the ones who were low income. I've been to schools where you could buy meal tickets, and then exchange a ticket instead of money at each meal, but I've never been to a school where nothing was exchanged for a meal.

That help?

------------------
To the rational mind there can be no offense, no obscenity, no blasphemy, but only information of greater or lesser value.
-- Jennifer Diane Reitz

[This message has been edited by Lynne (edited 04-21-2001).]


Posts: 266 | From: Portland, Oregon | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ErinK
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 1371

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ErinK     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think the whole not having to pay for food in a movie cafeteria is just a by product of the fact that no one ever pays for anything in a movie unless it's a vital plot point.

At most if not all high schools, students have to pay for their own lunches in some way shape or form. Some students who come from lower income families may have their lunches subsidized by the school district.

Students often also bring their own lunches to eat in the cafeteria (known as "brown bagging" where I'm from cause you'd put them in brown paper bags.)

Erin


Posts: 3077 | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
star1120
Activist
Member # 1624

Icon 1 posted      Profile for star1120     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
at my highschool, i pay for lunch! haha and we do have busy halls. horribly busy halls. at my school we have 8 classes, or periods, a day. all except 5th period are 40 minutes long. 5ht period is 1hr and 30min long but it is split into 3 periods 5a, 5b, and 5c. our school is attached to the jr high so the 7th and 8th graders eat 5a, then some highschool kids eat 5b, then the rest eat 5c. during 5th period when kids aren't eating, they have a class that is an hour long.
what i've learned about my school and, for example, schools in france is that my class schedule is the same everyday but in france, they have a different schedule everyday of the week, the week stays the same, but not the day.
and our halls are so busy because we have alot of students in an almost too small school. and some are rushing because they've only got 4 minutes to get to their locker and to their next class that is at the other end of the school! haha...
so yeah, that sums up my school! haha

Posts: 183 | From: ohio, usa | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pink
Activist
Member # 1071

Icon 1 posted      Profile for pink     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
At my school, low income families don't have to pay for lunch. Or, you can pay for a month a food at the beginning of every month. But noone really eats at the school here, we have an open campus, which means we can go off school grounds for lunch.

As for busy corridors, it usually depends on the student population. We've got a ton of people at my (public) highschool, so the halls are usually pretty crowded. But in the more rural towns, they're not.

Oh, freshman=ninth grade. Usually we're 14-15 years old. Sophmores are tenth graders, 15-16 years old. Then juniors, and seniors are the oldest. I didn't understand until a few years ago and I live in America .

------------------
Best body type for a man? Chunky style. With extra gravy


Posts: 615 | From: New York | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Star * Gal
Neophyte
Member # 3379

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Star * Gal     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thank you soooooo much everyone, i'm kinda getting the feel of it now. And now i know what they're talking about when they say sophomore and stuff
Posts: 11 | From: Somewhere not in America | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LilBlueSmurf
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 1207

Icon 1 posted      Profile for LilBlueSmurf     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Wow ... The American system really is a wee bit different from us Canadians ...

In Ontario, we have grade 13. We start school in junior kindergarten (JK) followed by senior kindergarten (SK) and then grades 1-5 is elementary school, 6-8 is middle school (junior high) and 9-12 is high school. Grade 13 is optional, but we need six OAC's (Ontario Academic Credits, grade 13) to get into university and i've noticed that a lot of colleges ask for a few as well. We follow the same "naming" system as the Americans but grade 13 is known as "second year sr." b/c ... it's really your second year being a senior. Who thinks these things up, anyway?


Posts: 7168 | From: Ontario | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
emsily0
Activist
Member # 2059

Icon 1 posted      Profile for emsily0     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
some people do a "year 13" here. a 2nd year senior here, though, is someone who didn't have enough credits to graduate high school, or who didn't fulfill the requirements or something.

but sometimes, people who did graduate will do something called a "post-grad year" where they go to a private school or a prep school for a year. that is usually done when people didn't get into the colleges they wanted to get into; a PG year helps that.

em

------------------
if you want to kiss the sky, you better learn how to kneel (on your knees, boy) -U2


Posts: 786 | From: Washington, DC | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rizzo
Activist
Member # 802

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rizzo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Wow, I'm from Ontario too, but we hardly ever used those junior/senior etc. terms. I've have never heard grade 13 referred to as second senior year... usually just OA or OAC.
Posts: 582 | From: Montreal, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cuddleslut
Activist
Member # 3349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for cuddleslut     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
At my school, we have to pay for food. It's really big, so we don't have a cafeteria, but we have a "student center" which basically offers really crappy food that you can buy (quality American food like corn dogs and fries and big pretzals), and has a few chairs. But basically, everybody goes off campus and eats across the street at Safeway, Starbucks, Jamba Juice, Whole Foods, Taco Bell, or this really good place with all kinds of expensive food called Grilly's. Or, they drive somewhere. It's too bad we don't get food free, but usually that means it's even more disgusting than the food you can buy. So I don't know which I'd prefer.

------------------
It's sickening how comforting the privacy of the mind can be...


Posts: 120 | From: california...well, at least it sounds cool. | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BruinDan
Activist
Member # 3072

Icon 1 posted      Profile for BruinDan     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My high school had almot 2000 people in it, and was built in 1939 and only designed for 950. So our halls were packed tight just like on television. Actually, if anyone saw the early 1990's TV show "The Wonder Years," all the interior school shots were actually taken at my high school, so you can kind of get a feel for what it was like.

As for lunches, our cafeteria was so competely disgusting that everyone who was able to do so packed a lunch. Only seniors (12th grade) were allowed to leave the campus for lunch, so the rest of us suffered in silence on campus.

I have no idea where the terms Freshman, Sophomore, etc came from...but I know that they have been around for many years. As part of a history project, I once located a yearbook from 1902, and it referred to students as being members of the "Freshman Class," "Soph Class" and "Senior Class." So apparently there is some history behind the madness.

--Danny

------------------
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood...

ICQ# 3953848


Posts: 2727 | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
towel42
Activist
Member # 3118

Icon 1 posted      Profile for towel42     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
While we're on this topic...I'm a bit curious about the European school system. I know a tad bit about the German system (though I couldn't talk details, we just had some German exchange students earlier in the year). I'm very much a bloody, sodding American (heh, I've got a dumb sense of humor) and don't know much about the school systems over seas.

Do they differ drastically from country to country? I've heard terms like "secondary school", though I don't totally know what that means. I hope somebody can fill me in. I plan to travel overseas a good number of times in the next few years, and I don't want to come off like a completely ignorant tourist.

------------------
...an angel who didn't so much fall as saunter vaguely downward...


Posts: 256 | From: Illinois | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Star * Gal
Neophyte
Member # 3379

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Star * Gal     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I come from NZ, and here our school system is pretty straight forward. We have years 1-13. We start school at 5 years old and leave around 17-18. Before you are 5 years old, you can attend a kindgarten, preschool or playschool, which are all practically the same thing. From 5 to 10 years old, or years 1-6, it is called primary school. From 11 to 12 years old, or years 7 and 8, it is called intermediate school, and from 13-17 years old, or years 9-13, it is called college or high school. There are a few schools which take years 1 right through to 13, but most schools are called primary schools, which are either just the primary years, or lots of the time, they include intermediate as well, and high school which is years 9-13.
As for cafeterias, at my school, we just have a tuckshop, where we wait in queues to buy food. We then pay for it, and either go and sit outside or if it's a wet day or something, we sit inside, in classrooms. As far as I know, know one at our school is allowed to leave for lunch.

Posts: 11 | From: Somewhere not in America | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Purple256
Neophyte
Member # 3566

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Purple256     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
From what I heard from my German friend, most European school systems are not extremely different from America. They have this type of school where you can choose which path you want to take in life (i.e. if you want to be a doctor, you go to medical school) so there are schools designated to a certain field. In Asia, it's very different because I remember that a typical school year in Korea is 11 months a year, 6 days a week, and 14 hours a day!
Posts: 6 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
momma cat
Activist
Member # 363

Icon 1 posted      Profile for momma cat     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Some schools have a pre-pay system for food: you pay into an account at some point, and then you have a card with a barcode or magnetic strips so that they can deduct the cost of your meal from your account. That's what I've done since junior high, but in elementary school we had meal tickets. You could buy any amount you wanted ahead of time and they were good for one meal. In elementary schools around here there are only two choices: you get the meal of the day, whatever that may be or the salad bar (or bring your own). And I remember someone would push a cart of milk around to all the classrooms so the kids who brought their meal could have cold milk with lunch. It cost 40 cents per carton or so and that was payed in cash.
Posts: 155 | From: WA | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Milke
Activist
Member # 961

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Milke     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
towel, secondary school in Canada is the same as high school.

At my school (I'm in my fifth, final, and not entirely necessary year), our cafeteria food is pretty damn good, because it's made and served by students. We've a bakery, kitchen and restaurant, as well as an autoshop, wood working rooms, hair salon, nursing area, and various other veyr practical things, as it's a tech school. It's also a year-round school, which I'm not entirely fond of, as the semestered system is a lot better in many ways, but it does mean we start in August, and have various breaks throughout the year, like the week off I've got now. Interesting topic.


Posts: 5122 | From: I *came* from the land of ice and snow | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Clav
Activist
Member # 678

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Clav     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I can't speak for anywhere else, but the UK system is a law-unto-itself.
If you go to private schools you start school at age 4/5 and have years J3-J1 (counting up, that wasn't a typo) followed by years 1-4. This is generally done at the same 'primary' school. Then you have either years 5-6 at the same school or start at 'secondary' school in year 1 when you're 11. If you carry on to year 6 at the primary school you start at year 3 when you're 13 at another school. Then you have years 4/5 (for GCSE's) before either going to a sixth form college or staying at your old school where you are years Lower 6then Upper 6 for A-Level.
Of course, this gets confused by some private secondary schools following a different system going Lower 4, Upper 4, Lower 5, Middle 5, Upper 5, Lower 6, Upper 6.
And, of course, there's then the state system which pretty much follows the system star*gal described. (apart from state sixth form colleges, which still follow the L6/U6 year system)
Then University!!! Which is great fun!!! (although we don't really have specialist schools. And, unlike in the US (knowledge based on TV you understand, correct me if I'm wrong) we actually pick a specific course and uni (can only apply to 6, not unlimited), rather than applying to university and picking modules when you get there. So at my uni there's loads of people on different courses - Business Admin, Sports Science, Economics and Politics etc who don't share any modules)
So, towel: you won't sound like a dumb tourist if you travel here, b/c UK students get confused when talking in peer groups about what year we're in, as people are on many different systems. (PS: I got food for free at my school, but it was horrible! But we had over 1000 acres of land and about 500 students, which was nice for walking around)
Calvin
"Things that happen, happen. Sometimes these things, in happening, cause other things to happen. These things may cause another thing to happen. But not necessarily in that order"

Posts: 54 | From: UK | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CallMeBuffChick
Activist
Member # 2101

Icon 1 posted      Profile for CallMeBuffChick     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Well at my school we have to wear uniforms on khaki's and a white or navy blue shirt. We also have to wear ids around out necks. Freshmen and sophomores have a maroon id with yellow lettering and our pictures, and information. Juniors and seniors have yellow ids with maroon lettering with there information on it.

On Monday thru Wednesday we have all classes but 4th block. Thrusday it's 2nd, 4th (study hall), 6th, and 8th block. Friday it's 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th block.

Lunchs are 45 mintues long. Only juniors and seniors are allowed to go off campus for lunch but I havent been caught yet::knock on wood:: But lunched at the school are ok. The menu goes like this: Cheeseburger w/french fries, Pizza with freshly tossed salad, pizza pocket with dipping sauce, and the ever so popular Chef Salad with you choice of dresssing. Then they have the Ala Carte, which they have nachos, pretzle with cheese, chicken nuggats, cookies, donuts, Little Debbie's snack foods, and other stuff. If you don't want any of that stuff there is vending machines in the hallways with the best stuff, and the pop (soda) machines.

And the drama department is the best!!!! Gina is such an awsome drama teacher!!! It's just so cool!

------------------
~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~
.:.Christine.:.
~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~


Posts: 433 | From: Wichita, Ks | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Eclipse
Activist
Member # 2254

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Eclipse     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Clav - so UK university 'courses' are like majors? You're right, in the US we can apply to as many colleges as we like, and you don't usually have to decide what you're going to take or major in there ahead of time (although it helps). Are there community colleges in the UK?
Posts: 257 | From: Sarasota, FL | Registered: Jan 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Clav
Activist
Member # 678

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Clav     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Eclipse:
Clav - so UK university 'courses' are like majors? You're right, in the US we can apply to as many colleges as we like, and you don't usually have to decide what you're going to take or major in there ahead of time (although it helps). Are there community colleges in the UK?

Not sure what a major is..but if you mean the principle subject, then yeah, it is like that. In my first year (this year) I only got 1 free choice module per semester, the rest were compulsory (so things like law, finance etc are part of my course: but people doing [eg sport science] wouldn't even have them as an option.) But next year I get all free choice modules: but they are choices specific to my course, so still wouldn't share with other courses 9well, except some shared economics modules...
There are community colleges, but I don't know enough about them to comment truthfully.


Posts: 54 | From: UK | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Starry Night
Activist
Member # 3476

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Starry Night     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Clav..
I spent the summer taking some courses at Cambridge (New Hall and Trinity) and absolutely loved the 'tutor' system..they should really implement that in the US!

In case anybody's wondering, my school is divided into a few parts. Pre-lower (pre-k and kindergarten), lower (1-5), middle (6-8), upper (9-12). We don't have a cafeteria..most private ones in the area just eat outside as we normally have nice areas, in little 'quads' with patios and tables kinda like the one in clueless, if you're ever seen the movie. Seniors in good academic standing are allowed off campus for lunch, and everyone else either brings it, has someone drop it off or brought in from a local cafe, or buys food that we have brought in from local places. Mondays it's pizza, tuesdays chinese, wed. subs, thursday special pastas, friday pizza, etc. Plus you can get drinks and snacks every day and they often sell bagels at break.


Posts: 164 | From: U.S.A. | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
AshleyInABottle
Activist
Member # 1029

Icon 1 posted      Profile for AshleyInABottle     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Freshman= First year of high school (13-14 yrs. old), grade 9
Sophomore= second year of high school (14-15 yrs. old), grade 10
Junior= third year of high school (15-16 yrs old), grade 11
Senior= fourth and last year of high school (16-18 yrs. old) grade 12

The ages might not be exact, but that's because it depends on when you start school. Like for example, I didn't turn 17 until my senior year, but some other people in my class are already 18 and *were* 18 when senior year started. It all depends.

------------------
"I do what my rice krispies tell me to do"


Posts: 156 | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Bahremu
Neophyte
Member # 1165

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Bahremu     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
In Canada we have a similar but slightly different way of naming our high scool years.
forst off, the whole education system starts at Junior Kindergarden, followed by Senior Kindergarden. The kids graduate after kindergarden to elementary school (even though the classes take place in the same physical building) elementary schooling is grade 1 throuht 8. The students then graduate into High School or secondary school that last from grade 9 to 12 (some provinces have a 13th grade). Some areas have a middle school which is usually grade 7 to 10, and high school starts at grade 11.

The naming of the highschool students in Canada is very different from the US. We don't have sophmores. Grade 9's are freshmen (in sports they are refered to as midgets -- guess it's cuz they're all short still) grade 10's are juniors. Grade 11s and grade 12s are all seniors. If there is a 13th grade level (liek ontario having OAC (it's being phased out though) they are refered to as OAC's).

it's all really simple.


Posts: 25 | From: Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
aquaholic17
Neophyte
Member # 3462

Icon 1 posted      Profile for aquaholic17     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I live in a small town in Saskatchewan, Canada. Here, you go to preschool, then go to kindergarden until you get to grade 6. Then, you go to highschool, where you stay until you're done school in grade 12. I don't really like the system, because there are a lot of younger kids around, and a lot of things are banned because they are seen as inappropriate for them. We only have about 300 kids in our school, so it's quite personal.
Posts: 12 | From: Can-ad-a | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Get the Whole Story! Go Home to SCARLETEEN: Sex Ed for the Real World | Privacy Statement

Copyright 1998, 2014 Heather Corinna/Scarleteen
Scarleteen.com: Providing comprehensive sex education online to teens and young adults worldwide since 1998

Information on this site is provided for educational purposes. It is not meant to and cannot substitute for advice or care provided by an in-person medical professional. The information contained herein is not meant to be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. You should always consult your own healthcare provider if you have a health problem or medical condition.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3