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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » EXPERT ADVICE » Ask Scarleteen » bcp questions

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Author Topic: bcp questions
acs79
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Member # 33994

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These questions aren't particularly serious, but I've always wondered about them and my doctor always seems to be in too much of a hurry for me to ask. So...

1. Assuming perfect use, is there a week where it's more risky to have sex if you're on the pill? For example, is having sex the first week of the active pills more risky because your hormone levels have dropped the week before and they're just getting higher again?

2. If your withdrawal bleed ends before you finish the placebo pills, are you still protected? Or should you start taking the active pills? This just recently became a question for me because my withdrawal bleeds are getting shorter each month.

Thanks!

Posts: 47 | From: USA | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
KittenGoddess
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Assuming perfect use, you have the same level of protection throughout the entire cycle. So no, there's no one time that's more or less risky.

And yes, as long as you've taken your pills correctly, you are still protected during your whole placebo week. Even if your bleed ends before you're done with your placebo week, you are still protected. And no, you should not start your new active pills sooner than 7 days after your last active pill, even if you're done with your bleed already. It's fine if your bleed is getting shorter. But if you start messing around with the cycle by doing things like starting your pills earlier than you should, you may have some unexpected side effects, etc. (So the short answer is that you should ALWAYS "take as directed".)

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Sarah Liz

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acs79
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way faster response than waiting a month to ask my gyno.
thanks!

Posts: 47 | From: USA | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
KittenGoddess
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Glad to help!

You know, you don't always have to wait until you can actually get into the office to ask questions of your doctor and/or pharmacist. It's actually pretty simple.
  • Call your doctor's office. I'd suggest calling either first thing in the morning when the office opens or in the mid-afternoon (just make sure you're calling a good 2-3 hours before the office closes). That way you'll likely be hitting a time when it's not crazy-busy in the office.
  • Say, "Hi there, my name is ___first & last name___ and I'm a patient of Dr. ____whoever____. I have a question about ___a prescription, a condition, etc.___. Can I please speak to a nurse or medical assistant?" At this point, you'll probably be put on hold, OR the person answering the phone may wish to take your name & number to have someone call you back. They may ask for your date of birth and/or social security number as well so that they can pull your medical chart. Please understand that they're not blowing you off when you're put on hold or if they say they'd like to call you back. The person you need may be busy or they may be able to better answer your question with your chart right in front of them.
  • When someone qualified does get on the phone with you to answer your question, say "Hi there, my name is ___first & last name___ and I'm a patient of Dr. ____whoever____. I have a question about ___a prescription, a condition, etc.___" again. This is important because sometimes the phone gets passed off without much detail given to the person who is taking your call.
  • State your problem or question as clearly and concisely as possible. Provide all details that might be relevant.
  • Get as much clarification as you need before you get off the phone.
  • Be prepared to have to leave a message. Sometimes the nurse or medical assistant will seek more information or clarification before giving you an answer to your question. They may want to take a message and leave it & your chart for the doctor to look at. Again, this is not blowing you off, they do this to try to get you the best information available. So be ready to leave a number and wait for a call back.


Often you can get an answer from your doctor really quickly if you call. [Smile]

[ 05-30-2007, 02:37 PM: Message edited by: KittenGoddess ]

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Sarah Liz

Posts: 7316 | From: USA | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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