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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Gender Issues » Gender-swap radio contest

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Author Topic: Gender-swap radio contest
Maharet
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A local radio station in Perth Australia is running a contest. I think it's also been done in other Aust states.
Basically, they take a man or two and make them act as women for a period of time and they get some sort of prize a the end (I haven't been listening that closely! lol)

Women ring in suggesting things that the men should do: wax their legs, wear make-up, etc (Ironically, things that I as a female don't do! ). I'm interested in the idea that if a woman did this (act like a man) that I can think of very few things that she could do as a man but wouldn't normally do. She could stop shaving her legs&armpits (maybe mock-shave her face) drink lots of beer, holler at sporting matches etc.

But none of these, to me, appear as great hardships. On the other hand, the waxing legs&wearing dresses are presented as great hardships by the radio station.

I suppose what I'm attempting to point out is that a man being a woman is presented as a degrading thing, but a woman being a man isn't nearly as much.

"A girl can wear jeans and cut her hair short, but for a man to wear a dress is degrading...becuase you think that being a girl is degrading" (Madonna, paraphrased).

What do we all think?

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"If you don't like gays, then they're everywhere, coming out of the woodwork to corrupt little children... but if you are gay, especially if you're in high school, you're the only one in the universe..."


Posts: 66 | From: Perth, Australia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dzuunmod
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It can go both ways, though. For instance, it means that women have many more options available to them, in terms of what they can wear and how they can look.

In that sense, I think women are lucky - though I realize there's a whole other issue at hand, here.

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I want to break my legs just so I won't forget to be nice to you.
-Moneen


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just*this*girl
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I think guys have it easy. Just an opinion though. I know there are some "high maitnence" guys but for the most part guys can get away with not doing their hair in the morning. And no shaving...WOO HOO. I be being a guy isnt easy but honestly girls have it prett bad.
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killer_raincoat
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but let's think of all the hardships men have to endure.
They can't 'dress up' any more than a suit.

They have to hide their feelings

They have to be strong

They have the problem of unexpected 'popping up'

They go through the embarrasing voice change

They can never feel as close to their child as a mother, because she gave birth

etc etc.
i'm glad i'm female. being of the opposite sex sounds alot less appealing.


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Celtic Daisy
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Once again, i'm noticing some generalizations too. A lot of that doesn't apply to every single guy. Men can dress how they want, they can show emotions, they can be close to their mothers. There aren't any rules out there, it's just things society has told us.

I really do'nt think this is a good idea because it can cause a whole lot of problems with everyone's different views, but i'm sure it will be wildly entertaining for some.

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'You've got the eyes of ten women. Not in a jar! I wasn't accusing you. I just mean your eyes are really nice'-coupling

Erin Jane
~Scarleteen Advocate~


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kythryne
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Erin is absolutely right. As far as I know, there just aren't any gender police out there running around issuing citations for improper gender expression. Yes, a man in a dress may get some weird looks, he may get harrassed or made fun of -- but he's free to choose to dress in that fashion. Just as women are free to shave or not shave, wear dresses or wear pants, etc.


Just for the record, I've known plenty of men who don't hide their feelings, who are gentle, who absolutely adore their children, and yes, even some who dress up in any sort of clothing they want. And on a similar note, I've known women who hid their emotions so well you couldn't tell they had any, who didn't feel close to their children, etc, etc, etc.

This is an interesting discussion, but let's please remember that no one is being forced to act in any particular way. Yes, society pressures people to act in certain ways, but we're all free to make our own choices in life. So please try to refrain from making absolute statements about what people can and can't do, eh?

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Kythryne Aisling
Scarleteen Sexpert

"The only unnatural sexual act is that which you cannot perform."
-- Alfred Kinsey

[This message has been edited by kythryne (edited 03-31-2002).]


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Daydreamer24
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stop the stereotyping! stop the stereotypiing!

Those ideas are really stereotypical. Not every guy shaves their facial hair and drinks a lot of beer. Is the point of the broadcast for it to be a stereotypical-fun-kinda thing to just play around with? Or was it supposed to be real things people do?

Like Daisy said, men can show their feelings (and I like when they do ), they can be close to their moms, and can dress however.

I think that both sexes have it pretty hard. That's kind of a cute idea, but maybe a little painful for men. Some people may get hurt or offended by that, too.

What exactly was the question?

<edited 'cause I can't spell today>

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Don't Mess With Texas

[This message has been edited by Daydreamer24 (edited 03-31-2002).]


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sapphirecat
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What's so degrading about dressing femmy? It makes me feel more masculine. (Yes, I am aware of how strange that sounds.)

I believe the grass is greener on the other side of the fence. (And there may be no grass on top of the fence, but only because society made it that way.)

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Sapphire Cat
Looks won't tell who's living inside.
Artist, poet, programmer, dreamer, and crossdressing bondage kitty


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Celtic Daisy
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quote:
Originally posted by sapphirecat:
What's so degrading about dressing femmy?

Exactly my piont. And also, i just wanted to say, i like your sig, and i think it makes an extremely good point in regards to this thread.

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'You've got the eyes of ten women. Not in a jar! I wasn't accusing you. I just mean your eyes are really nice'-coupling

Erin Jane
~Scarleteen Advocate~


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killer_raincoat
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i think i have a right to generalize here erin (celtic)
i'm not saying men can't do all those things as in the same as they can't have babies, i mean, society dicates that they are less of a man for crying in public, or wearing makeup.

i'd appreciate if you all would stop pretending we live in a perfect world where men are free to act the way they want.

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"Everybody thinks i'm such a horrible person, but i have the heart of a little boy. In a jar. On my desk." -Stephen King


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Dzuunmod
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I think I'm going to have to side with Killer, here.

I'd like to wear women's clothes once in a while in public, but I don't. I'd like to show emotions more than I do, but I don't. I'd like to wear makeup sometimes, but I don't.

For some men, they might be able to deal with society's perception of them doing the things I just mentioned, and that's their reality. It also appears to be the reality of many users here, like sapphirecat, and I have a great deal of respect for men who make their reality.

But for so many others, reality is different. I can't do those things. I think (though I can never be sure) that many men probably feel as I do. I'm just too afraid, and that's been my reality for a long time. In a sense, many of you are denying me my reality.

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I want to break my legs just so I won't forget to be nice to you.
-Moneen


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Confused boy
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I agree with Killer Raincoat as well. Us men dont get it as easy as some of you girls think. The pervading culture sets up psychological barriers that inhibit men from acting who they want to be. Women have overcome many of their previous barriers.

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'An Anarchist is a Liberal with a bomb' Trotsky


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Celtic Daisy
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Okay, i see the point. I agree, society has put some screwed up messages in our heads. I suppose that i've grown up being rather open minded, so if i were to see any of that, honestly, i wouldn't care that much.

It's true though, society has made men out to be a certain thing, and that is something that woman have overcome...somewhat.

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'You've got the eyes of ten women. Not in a jar! I wasn't accusing you. I just mean your eyes are really nice'-coupling

Erin Jane
~Scarleteen Advocate~


Posts: 1747 | From: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sapphirecat
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quote:
Originally posted by Dzuunmod:
For some men, they might be able to deal with society's perception of them doing the things I just mentioned, and that's their reality. It also appears to be the reality of many users here, like sapphirecat, and I have a great deal of respect for men who make their reality.

I feel obligated to mention that most of my dressing is done behind closed doors. The only hints I give outside are the glitter and (if I'm feeling particularly strong that day) lipstick, although I'm planning on painting my nails blue soon.

I find it incredibly ironic that it takes so much courage to be feminine.

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Sapphire Cat
Looks won't tell who's living inside.
Artist, poet, programmer, dreamer, and crossdressing bondage kitty


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Heather
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Just a tip: a very easy way to avoid stereotyping and still be accurate is really one simple word: "some." Really, that's it and it works very well.

It'd help to keep discussions on track, and it'd help with wide inclusion that when you're going to talk about traits for a given group of people that do not very firmly apply to them all to just say that "some" <insert group here> experience this or that.

I'[m not okay with generalizing here in this way because it just doesn't hold water -- in ANY direction. Some men face some or all of the challenges or traits listed above, others do not; some live in cultures which stigamtyize some or all of those things, and others do not. And that really isn't that difficult to communicate.

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Heather Corinna
Editor and Founder, Scarleteen

My epitaph should read: "She worked herself into this ground."
-- Kay Bailey Hutchinson


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Celtic Daisy
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That's good advice. I'm always trying to follow that rule. I also use the "i" rule, when you state an opinion, make sure people know it's your opinion.

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'You've got the eyes of ten women. Not in a jar! I wasn't accusing you. I just mean your eyes are really nice'-coupling

Erin Jane
~Scarleteen Advocate~


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HeatherRocksMyBobbySocks
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I know that I'm sort of naive, and I overidealize *everything* and no matter what I still like to go through life pretending that everything is happy and glittery. It's probably one of my bigger faults. And I know that there's a lot of the world out there that I don't see because I don't want to see it that way, but...I will say that I'm lucky because even though I don't see a lot, what I do let myself see I'm in love with.

I love the fact that in my old crowd (I say 'old' because I'm not allowed to hang out there anymore) I could and would change clothes with my boyfriend. He'd steal the skirts right off of my body and throw his pants at me. And no one really gave him a second look (within the crowd). And there's a chick who is queer, she has a boy's haircut and shops in the boy's section of stores and a lot of people think she's a guy when they first meet her. But...it doesn't really phase us. And it's not uncommon to see a guy and a girl arguing over whether the guy's green bondage skirt is cuter than the girl's red one.

At the coffe shop I 'used' to hang out in, it wasn't strange to see a guy wearing flared pants and glitter and make-up. It just wasn't. And I know I'm lucky that I can close my eyes to the rest of the world and just see these really nifty people and places, but...

I think it's a good little reminder to people that in some places you don't get harassed for not acting the way your gender stereotype says you should.

So I guess I don't see the big deal about making guys wax or shave their legs (more and more guys I know do that, even with the 'normal popular' crowd at my school), or wearing makeup or glitter or a dress. *shrugs* but that's just me.


Posts: 103 | From: Las Vegas, NV | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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