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» Scarleteen Boards: 2000 - 2014 (Archive) » SCARLETEEN CENTRAL » Safer Sex & Birth Control » IUD

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Author Topic: IUD
Atonement
Scarleteen Volunteer
Member # 42492

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I've been on the pill Yasmin for about 4 months, and I love it. I've ha no bad side effects, and i've had lighter, more regular, painless periods and less pms.

But lately i've been making some travel plans, and i really don't think the pill will work out too well, since im going to be dealing with time change issues.

I'm not curious about the IUD. I know the're even more effective. However, I like hormonal methods, i don't think I can get a hormonal IUD, as i've never been pregnant.

How would an iud affect my periods. I'm kind of uneasy about them going away entirely. Do you think they would reccoment one to a 19 year old who's never had a baby?

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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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Generally, the best candidate for an IUD (either the Mirena, which has a little localized hormone, or the Paraguard, which does not: both work in the same way, though: the hormones in the Mirena aren't what make the IUD work) has been pregnant before, even if it didn't end in a live birth. Women who have are simply more likely to find the insertion and the IUD itself comfortable, and also less likely to have the IUD expel itself.

But that doesn't mean you can't have an IUD, either: plenty of women who have not been pregnant before get IUDs and do just fine.

The other big consideration with an IUD is the risk of PID: so, I'd also be very sure if you are going to get one that you and your partner have a full STI screening first, and if everything is negative, be as sure as you can be you're both committed to either monogamy or latex barrier use per safer sex.

BUT, I'd not advise having an IUD put in when you know you are going to be traveling right away, especially way far from home or in different countries: if you have any issues with it, you could be screwed when it comes to finding quick care. As well, if you do find it to be painful for the first few weeks or months, that's probably not going to be so awesome while traveling.

The pill can work just fine when you have time changes, by the way: it's really not a major deal. It sounds like you've liked the pill a lot, so a time change issue alone is a pretty teeny thing to ditch something that is working for you otherwise for. Alternately, if you do well on the pill otherwise, you might consider switching to the patch or the ring: same hormone combo, no need to worry about exact hours.

[ 06-14-2009, 05:52 PM: Message edited by: Heather ]

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Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
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Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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Atonement
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I think I probably will stay on the pill, at least for a while, but I am really curiuos about the IUD.

I've allready ruled out the patch and the ring for now because my copay is roughly eight times more for brand name drugs than generics. I'm also a little afraid that it would fall off/out. And another (probably ridiculous and impossible) concern is that with the hormones being absorbed through my vagina, that my boyfriend might accidentaly absorb some during sex.

I love the way the pill works, but I feel like it would be really great to have a form of birth control that I only had to worry about every couple years versus every day.

Also, PID isn't really an issue, my boyfriend and I have been monogamous for over a year, buth tested negitave, and use a condom as a backup anyway.

However, how do you think the time change would work. My pill packet says for perfect use, you have to take it every 24 hours. I take mine at 8am. But when I go om my trip, i'll be 2 hours behind, so my technical scheduled time would be 6, when I REALLY do not want to be up, lol. Do you think that after I come back home I should hold off sex for a couple weeks so my body can readjust?

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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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A two hour time difference for the combined pill is nothing at all to be concerned with. Ultimately, you have a grace period of around twelve hours, it's just ideal to take it around the same time of day every day.

But, if you want to have no difference at all, if it's time for a new pill pack before your trip, pick a time that works for you in BOTH time zones, and just start the new pack at the new time.

Just to clarify something, though?

quote:
And another (probably ridiculous and impossible) concern is that with the hormones being absorbed through my vagina, that my boyfriend might accidentaly absorb some during sex.
That is a totally unfounded concern for vaginal or uterine methods (ring or IUD) that contain hormones. Your boyfriend cannot absorb the hormones in his body through yours. And if he's concerned about that, you might want to tell him that if he's a meateater, he's probably eaten a tone of bovine growth hormone in his life as it is, and that's the kind of place where it makes sense to have concerns, because that is actual.

But for future reference, you certainly can talk to your doctor about an IUD if you like. Another method you don't have to worry about for years is the implant.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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Atonement
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Is the implant visible once it heals up? That sounds like a good thing, but i don't really want to be asked "what are those little lines in your arm?" all the time.

I'm also intrested in the depo-provera, but am concerned about the osteoporosis issues, and the fact that there's no withdrawl period. With my pill, i get pretty pms-y the week before i start my placebos, but it goes away as soon as I start them. I'd be afraid that it'd go out of control if i didn't have a withdrawl period.

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Heather
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The implant we have now is one rod, about as thin as a piece of uncooked spaghetti. In the first week or two after it's put in it can be a bit visible, but after it settles, it's not something someone can see. It's under the fat in the arm, not just under the top layer of skin.

Per Depo, given your age (coming out of your teens), bone density isn't much to worry about so long as you take breaks from Depo every few years. And it wouldn't likely impact your PMS the way you're thinking. In fact, with your pill the PMS isn't likely relieved because of the placebos, since it isn't likely caused by the hormones in the active pills (and thus relieved by ceasing them for a week), if you get me.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

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Atonement
Scarleteen Volunteer
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Yeah, I see what you're saying. The pms is something that really confused me though. I always thought that once on the pill, my body would kind of rely on the pill to control my hormones and all that. So it kind of confused me to see that i still get pms on the pill. I mean, how does my body know I'm going to have my period next week when i'm only bleeding because i'm taking a break from the hormones?

I'm really curious about how all this works, and therefore, am coming up with a lot of (generally inacurate) theorys on what it's doing, lol.

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Heather
Executive Director & Founder
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Well, not everyone using hormonal methods finds they manage PMS. But you may also just need to try a few different brands to see if you can't find one that does help more. However, the pill doesn't mean you don't have hormonal changes anymore: you still do, just not the same ones you have without it. And the pill doesn't "control" all your hormones, rather, it influences some of them.

Too, I'd talk to a doctor about your PMS so they can really take a look at what's going on: sometimes PMS may actually be about certain deficiencies, like a deficiency of serotonin or other vitamins and minerals. Diet can have a lot to do with it for some women as well. Hormonal contraceptives also are not always the proper treatment -- or any treatment at all -- for PMS, either.

--------------------
Heather Corinna, Executive Director & Founder, Scarleteen
About Me • Get our book!
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

Posts: 68290 | From: An island near Seattle | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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