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To: Current Resident of That Broken-Down House

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Submitted by Heather Corinna on Sat, 2010-05-29 11:06

I moved to Seattle around four years ago from Minneapolis, where I lived for six years after leaving my hometown of Chicago. Growing up in Chicago, living in Minnesota and after an early childhood on the east coast, I was used to old things, to history, to a total lack of shiny-and-new. Growing up poor and in a number of far less-than-ideal living situations, my normal in how and where I lived was often pretty rough around the edges, and often involved a lot of effort from me, typically more than my fair share.

Seattle, however, is kind of the land of shiny-and-new. Almost every place I looked at when I was apartment-hunting felt sanitized and kind of like Barbie's Dream House to me: without my kind of character and so already-finished that I didn't see where there was room for my own stamp in them. The allure of the fixer-upper was nowhere to be found. I've always liked fixing places up that anyone else would see as hopeless: it's a challenge, and a situation where I might have the ability to feel like I'm awesome because I took something shitty and made it fantastic. I've always felt more at home in places that were a bit of a disaster, probably because that's just what I was used to, but whatever.

As it turns out, I found this house to rent that seemed amazing: it was over 100 years old, and in a neighborhood that at the time, had more old character and charm than new stuff. It had a ton of kooky little quirks I found really charming. It needed a bunch of work done to potentially make it nice, but it had the raw materials to be something awesome with work. I didn't think twice about how quickly the landlord rented it out to me, because I wanted it, so that just seemed like serendipity. Like this was meant to be my house, to the point that I had this idea that had anyone else tried to rent it, it would not have been so easy for them.

I did do a lot of creative work with it, though not as much as I'd have liked to. I just didn't have the time or the resources to do so much of it mostly on my own. As well, even from the start, I should have seen some red flags I just didn't. For instance, while I was so into working on it, my housemate wasn't as invested in that as I was. I should have recognized that when a landlord says you can just do whatever you want with a place with no limits, they're either not being truthful or just don't care much about the place. I also had to pay some of the costs of fixing it up, rather than the landlord paying me to do labor he should have done himself.

As the years went by, more things kept falling apart and breaking. I tried to keep up with them mostly on my own, especially since when I asked for help, what was given was either substandard or radio silence. Within a year, my lease also got shifted to a month-to-month lease, meaning that the landlord could ask me to go pretty much anytime with very little notice. Having survived that exact situation more than once in my life, and so barely, that felt horribly unstable, but I just accepted it instead of trying hard to assert my needs. Still, I felt more comfortable here than I thought I would have felt moving, both because moving or any kind of big start-over is so hard, and because this place felt so familiar, not just with its style and age, but with it's whole vibe: I've lived almost all of my life in places that were falling apart or neglected. I was used to that, and however uncomfortable that as, something about that did feel like home.

Last year, it finally became clear that I could drive myself batty trying to keep this place liveable and it just wasn't going to happen. I spent a winter without working heat in half the house, wrapped up in blankets all day working in front of a space heater. The basic fixtures kept breaking. There were leaks, including one that nearly took down my kitchen ceiling, and a lack of insulation that cost me more money in bills than I have to spend. One day, I was so frustrated with two things that broke that I just gave up, went to get myself a glass for some wine, and when I opened the cabinet, the door fell off in my hand. On top of my house falling apart all around me, I didn't even like the city it was in very much, and my neighborhood had also changed radically during the time I lived here in ways I did not like at all, and was not going to change back. I sank to the floor in a pile of tears, already upset due to building stress from managing work and some other huge changes in my life. It all felt so hopeless, and I so felt trapped in it, especially since at the time, moving wasn't an option I felt I could handle financially or practically.

But why was I staying in a city I didn't really like in the first place? Why was I staying in a house that was falling apart all around me more and more? Why did I keep trying to convince myself I could fix everything when I knew I couldn't, or that my landlord would suddenly do all kinds of things he'd never done? Why did I keep focusing on the small things that I loved about the house when the big things were so awful? Why was I investing more and more money, effort and love into something where getting a real return on that investment was about as likely as a million dollars falling from the sky? Why was I staying so focused on what this house could be, rather than focusing on the way it actually was and was most likely to remain? Why was I accepting a total lack of help from the people who should be helping me with it while ignoring some potential help others could have given me to be somewhere better? I'm a smart person: why on earth was I being so stupid?

Ultimately, I think it came down to the fact that I was so bogged down and overspent with a lot of things in my life, including this damn house. On top of everything else I was dealing with, the idea of feeling displaced from any kind of home at all, even a poor one, just seemed like too much. I had taken part in digging myself in deeper and deeper into a pit: having to take responsibility for the place I was keeping myself in was harder than being unhappy, but being able to pin it entirely on what the house was doing, what my housemate and landlord were not doing. I had gotten attached and stayed so attached to the "what-ifs" and had invested so much time, money and heart into this place: I was having trouble accepting my hopes for it were simply never going to come to fruition because it seemed like such a waste. I had gotten scared of making a change, and had strangely managed to forget that I was capable of making it and had done so many times before in my life, even when it was harder than this was now. I had become comfortable in being uncomfortable.

In a few weeks, I'm moving out.

I'm leaving this house and this city for one of the beautiful small islands just outside of it. For many years no, I've talked about how I've spent almost all of my life in very urban areas, yet when I needed peace, it's rural areas I've gone to to find it, and so I felt I might actually be a lot happier living rurally. The way my workday most often is, I can actually get away with only needing to go into the city a few times a month for work, so it is doable. Because it's just a short ferry ride into the city, I can be rural here while also having easy access to the city. I found a place to move to with almost the exact same rent as I'm paying now, but where everything works and nothing is broken. Sure, it's only 20 years old, so that feels and looks unfamiliar to me, but it's beautiful inside and out. I will literally get to wake up every day and walk out into the forest, which is heaven on earth to me. As is often the case, if we can shake ourselves out of our miasma, we can usually identify not only ways to get out of it, but ways that getting out can be part of pursuing more of what we've wanted and had as goals all along.

Of course, this means my having to pack up everything and move again. It means money spent on moving and resettling, which is always a major strain. It means all the practical, tiresome crap you have to do to relocate. That means risking that a new place or space may or may not be better than the old one in some ways, even though it most certainly will be in other ways. That means having to deal with change, which even when it's positive, is often uncomfortable and scary.

You may perhaps be wondering why I'm going on here at Scarleteen about my move. I'd be wondering, too.

I only just realized one of the big things that got me to these realizations about my house were conversations with some of you about your unhealthy, abusive or otherwise crummy relationships. So, I figured the least I owed you for that epiphany was the possibility of doing you the same turn, especially since your bad relationships have the capacity to screw you and your life up you a whole lot more than my bad house has the capacity to screw me and my life up.

We often have users come to Scarleteen who are in abusive, unhealthy, dysfunctional or craptastic relationships. Most of the time, you do know they're bad before we talk with you about them. Sometimes, you don't realize how bad until we talk, or have been trying to hold unto denials or the hopes that the relationship will just get better, either by some kind of magic, by someone who has never made any effort miraculously starting to, or by you, yourself, going nuts to try and make something bad into something good alone. Just like me, with this house.

I could stay here. My rent would keep going up and the house would keep costing me more and more while it all kept falling apart around me. I could put in continued effort while my landlord kept putting in less and less. I could freeze through another winter, trying to keep myself warm with the memory of the heat that used to work, the way the house probably was 50 years ago, the beautiful changes I made that could never quite get all finished but still might, and the hopes I had for this house, when it felt like nothing but lovely and positive possibility. I could stay here and risk the whole ceiling caving in on my head, which has become a real possibility.

You could stay where you're at, too. You could stay and, at best, things would stay just as bad or as substandard as they are now or, more realistically, you could stay and they would keep getting worse. You could stay and keep investing more and more while getting less and less. You could freeze through another winter, trying to keep yourself warm with your hopes, those past feelings of possibility, and the time when things did seem okay, shutting out the reality which has made clear that those hopes will only ever be hopes. You could stay and risk someone abusive and unhealthy doing you the kind of harm that you can't come back from, which is often a real possibility.

I could stay, and so could you. But I can also go. I can take the chance and the risk of something better, remember or learn what I'm really capable of. I can get the hell out of here and do the grieving I need to about what could have been, but wasn't, and move forward, putting my time and effort and energy into something or somewhere much more likely to be worth that kind of investment. I can move into something that doesn't need fixing now or right from the onset. I can step outside my comfort zone and likely wind up feeling more comfortable once the dust settles, rather than less. So can you.

I know that it's hard as hell to leave a bad or abusive relationship, especially the longer you've been in it, the more hopes you tacked on to it, the more promises you believed, the more your whole life got sucked into it and tethered to it. It's harder still if you have managed to convince yourself or allowed yourself to be convinced that any or all parts of the abuse are love or some kind of natural and unavoidable consequence of your existence.

I could tell myself that he floor that is wasting away in this house was once so, so beautiful, and old things just need my love to be better. I could convince myself that if I made more money, or chose to do something else with my life than I do, I'd not be in this house, I'd be able to have kept it running better, or able to have been more assertive with my landlord. I could figure that all of this would be something I could handle if I had done things differently and had more to fall back on. But I didn't, so this is why this is happening, right? This is what I am solely responsible for and stuck with, right?

Wrong. My house is falling apart because before I even got here people who were supposed to take care of it well didn't. It's falling apart because it needs a kind of help that my love or my residency can't provide. For sure, I have some responsibility in what happened here: I could have moved out earlier if I'd have asked more people for help, if I'd taken some positive risks earlier -- and maybe even put myself in a temporary space to be able to do that that wasn't great, but helped me get closer to being able to make positive changes. All the same, while I'm responsible for not changing my circumstances when I could, what I'm not responsible for is for this house not housing me well, just like you're not responsible for any way someone abused or mistreated you. You're just responsible for doing all you can to get away from it to a place that's safe, sound and where your love, effort and care will be returned in kind.

Am I going to miss things about this old house, this neighborhood, this city? Absolutely. There's an old clawfoot bathtub here that is divine, even though the faucet never stops leaking. I made a great garden here and a meadow up front. I painted things here that are very creative and cool and have my unique stamp: I hate to leave them, they feel like part of me. I have routines here. I have a couple places I go here that I really like. I'll be further away from a couple of friends. But I'll deal: new places offer new things to value. When I'm honest with myself, it's impossible to deny that what I'll be missing the most was how things were when I first moved in, when the bloom wasn't off the rose. When my feelings about everything were painted with the exceptional spackle that a sense of possibility is and the desire for something great can be. I had hopes for this house, but they didn't come to fruition. That sucks, but it also happens in life, and usually more than once. You accept it, your brush your knees off, and then you find new hopes, hopefully getting a little better each time at identifying where those hopes are more likely to become realities. You also accept that we've got to take risks for the good stuff.

It may be that the change I'm about to make, the next place I'm going, turns out similarly. I'm pretty sure it won't, because I've applied some lessons I learned from this. I've set it up, for instance, so that I have a long-term lease: I made clear from the start I refused to sign unto something month-to-month, because I know that doesn't provide me the stability I need and know I deserve to have my needs met. I recognized that getting a better place, a more functional place, meant the screening process and the way in took more time and was not quite as easy as getting this place was, and I accepted that. I've made sure that nothing needs to be fixed by me: walking into this new place, everything already works and nothing is already broken. I've asked for help and support from the people around me in my transition, and they're glad to provide it. I'm leaving things behind here that I just don't need or that I know hinder me.

Sure, it's more shiny-and-new than I'm used to, it's somewhere I haven't lived before, and I'm going to have to learn to do some things well I'm not yet good at. And maybe the forest that has always felt like a great refuge for me won't feel the same when it's where I live instead of where I visit. It's totally possible. If and when we do things differently, apply what we've learned and make choices based on goals we've had for ourselves... that's when we tend to net different results, better results.

While my move comes with some question marks, continuing to stay here comes with few. The trouble is, the certainty in staying is all about being sure that, at best, things would stay exactly as crap as they are. What's even more likely is that they'd get crappier. When we're honest with ourselves, we all know something falling apart is going to stay falling apart once we've done all we can to try and repair it with no results. I have to recognize that things would get worse if I stayed: more things would fall apart, and I'd get more and more hopeless and trapped, especially since the longer I stay, the tougher it is to go.

Am I scared? You bet. Big changes are scary, even when they're potentially good ones. Even as someone who has taken many big risks in her life and gone through a lot of changes, big change never really stops being scary. I'm nervous and scared and I feel a bit unsteady on my feet, even though I'm moving toward something I have wanted and dreamed about, something that very clearly is far more likely to be positive and better.

So I keep reminding myself that this is living. Trying new things, taking risks that seem likely to be beneficial, stepping outside my comfort zone in pursuit of personal growth and positive change, is all of what being alive is all about. I shouldn't feel stuck in the ground until I'm six feet under, after all. Staying stuck, sticking with anything that clearly isn't working, avoiding what's new and unknown is the antithesis of living: it's refusing to be fully alive. That's not who I am, and I'm sure it's not who any of you are.

I know that my house isn't exactly your relationship, particularly since, as an object, it doesn't have the ability to have the kind of power over me another person could have, and I also couldn't get as attached to it as I could to another person. While the conditions of my house are awful, my house itself can't manipulate me or try and control me. My house isn't doing anything maliciously, nor does it know it's treating me horribly and trying to rationalize it or someone make it's actions seem like my fault. My house also doesn't have the capacity to fix itself, unlike whoever you're in a relationship with.

My house isn't calling me names, isn't telling me I'm stupid or a slut, isn't accusing me of things I haven't done or trying to control where I go or who I talk to. My house isn't trying to keep me from my friends, family or other people who care about me and would make sure I'm always safe; my house isn't trying to limit me in what I do in my life so that it can feel superior to me or make it tougher for me to go. My house isn't destroying my cherished belongings on purpose. My house isn't hitting or punching me, isn't raping me or trying to coerce me into sex or pregnancies I don't want. My house isn't doing horrible things to me and telling me I asked for them. My house, itself, didn't actually make me any promises it knew it couldn't keep. My house also doesn't have the capacity to choose what it does or doesn't do, and isn't actively choosing to treat me badly. It earnestly can't help or change the state that it's in, unlike the person who is failing or abusing you who has chosen not to work on themselves to get better and to stop hurting you, others and themselves. My house isn't telling me that I couldn't do better, that it's as good as it gets. My house will let me leave a bad situation without trying to trick or force me into staying in something where I'm going to continue to be harmed.

My house isn't your relationship or your partner. If any of those things are happening to you in your relationship, your house, as it were, is in a much worse state than mine is. Which begs the big question: why are you staying when I'm leaving?

Like I said, I know leaving a bad relationship is hard, and that leaving an abusive relationship is even harder. I've been in that spot (which is some of why I feel so bothered by how it took me so long to recognize the problems with this house), and have had friends there, too. If you need help in leaving, come and ask for it. You can ask me or one of the staff here and we'll be happy to help you find local resources to help you out, you can call any number of hotlines, look up your local domestic violence/intimate partner violence shelter or support group or you can ask the people you know really love and care for you for help, being honest with them about what's going on.

But if you don't want to freeze through another winter, have the roof cave in on you or wind up more and more trapped in your interpersonal version of this sad, crumbling house, then you've got to take at least one step that'll get you to the kind of space that will earnestly be a good home for your heart and your spirit, even if those first steps feel shaky or your knees knock when you take them. I deserve and am worthy of that. So are you.

Comments

Regarding houses

Tue, 2010-08-03 01:44
Anonymous

It's one thing to put this sort of effort into a breaking, non-functional house which you *own outright*, so any improvement you make is guaranteed to rebound to *you*.

It's another, much less reasonable, to put that sort of investment into a *rental*.

I don't think this can be extended to your analogy at all, but I've been thinking about home improvement a lot lately.

The house that is not ours- "relationship" with abusive partner

Tue, 2010-07-20 23:03
Anonymous

Excellent. Thank you.

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