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I took my pill two hours late. Is this okay?

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Jellybean102999 asks:

Hi, my boyfriend and I have been together for a year and we just had sex for the first time the other day. I'm on the pill, but I'm still really nervous because he came inside of me. I had gotten my period on Monday and started my new cycle of the pill. My period ended Wednesday and we had sex Thursday night. On Tuesday and Wednesday, I took my pill at 8:30 at night, but I usually take it at 6:30 pm. Then on Thursday, I took it at 6:30. Is this a problem? I've been so paranoid the last few days and I can't get my mind off of it. All of my friends keep telling me that I'm fine. I had a little stomach ache Friday morning, the day after we had sex. That made me even more nervous and I kept thinking I had morning sickness! All of my friends use the pill and their boyfriends ejaculate in them all the time, even when my friends forget to take their pill one night or something. I've been on the pill since August now, so my body is used to it. Do I have a lot to worry about?! I keep freaking out and asking my friends millions of questions and they keep telling me I'm fine. I feel fine and I don't feel any different after that stomach ache I had, but I'm still thinking about it. Thanks for your help!

Hollie replies:

The closer you take your birth control pill to the 'normal time' the better. That said, you do have some flexibility (an hour or two, tops).

You don't sound comfortable using the birth control pill as your sole method of birth control. Have you talked to your partner about this? Many couples use condoms in addition to the birth control pill. If you both have not been tested for STIs, are monogomous, and have been so for over 6 months, you should be using condoms anyway, to prevent STIs.

Morning sickness does not appear within the first week of sex. Pregnancy doesn't even happen that fast. A missed period is most often the first sign of pregnancy, not morning sickness. The stomachache was most likely due to stress of worrying about an unplanned pregnancy. You really have no risk of pregnancy here though.

Safe, Sound & Sexy: A Safer Sex How-To
Safer Sex...for Your Heart
Sexual Negotiation for the Long Haul
STI Risk Assessment: The Cliff's Notes

written 09 Jan 2008 . updated 26 May 2008

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